Publications by authors named "J Martijn Bos"

1,228 Publications

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Effects of potent neutralizing antibodies from convalescent plasma in patients hospitalized for severe SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Nat Commun 2021 05 27;12(1):3189. Epub 2021 May 27.

Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

In a randomized clinical trial of 86 hospitalized COVID-19 patients comparing standard care to treatment with 300mL convalescent plasma containing high titers of neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, no overall clinical benefit was observed. Using a comprehensive translational approach, we unravel the virological and immunological responses following treatment to disentangle which COVID-19 patients may benefit and should be the focus of future studies. Convalescent plasma is safe, does not improve survival, has no effect on the disease course, nor does plasma enhance viral clearance in the respiratory tract, influence SARS-CoV-2 antibody development or serum proinflammatory cytokines levels. Here, we show that the vast majority of patients already had potent neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at hospital admission and with comparable titers to carefully selected plasma donors. This resulted in the decision to terminate the trial prematurely. Treatment with convalescent plasma should be studied early in the disease course or at least preceding autologous humoral response development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23469-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8160346PMC
May 2021

Neuropsychiatric safety of varenicline in the general and COPD population with and without psychiatric disorders: a retrospective cohort study in a real-world setting.

BMJ Open 2021 05 25;11(5):e042417. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of PharmacoTherapy, -Epidemiology & -Economics, Groningen Research Institutte of Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To evaluate the real-world association between varenicline and neuropsychiatric adverse events (NPAEs) in general and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) population with and without psychiatric disorders compared with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to strengthen the knowledge of varenicline safety.

Design: A retrospective cohort study.

Setting: Prescription database IADB.nl, the Netherlands.

Participants: New users of varenicline or NRT among general (≥18 years) and COPD (≥40 years) population. Psychiatric subcohort was defined as people prescribed psychotropic medications (≥2) within 6 months before the index date.

Outcome Measures: The incidence of NPAEs including depression, anxiety and insomnia, defined by new or naive prescriptions of related medications in IADB.nl within 24 weeks after the first treatment initiation of varenicline or NRT.

Results: For the general population in non-psychiatric cohort, the incidence of total NPAEs in varenicline (4480) and NRT (1970) groups was 10.5% and 12.6%, respectively (adjusted OR (aOR) 0.85, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.00). For the general population in psychiatric cohort, the incidence of total NPAEs was much higher, 75.3% and 78.5% for varenicline (1427) and NRT (1200) groups, respectively (aOR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.99). For the COPD population (1598), there were no differences in the incidence of NPAEs between comparison groups in both the psychiatric cohort (aOR 0.97, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.44) and non-psychiatric cohort (aOR 0.81, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.20). Results from subgroup or sensitivity analyses also did not reveal increased risks of NPAEs but showed decreased risk of some subgroup NPAEs associated with varenicline.

Conclusions: In contrast to the concerns of a possible increased risk of NPAEs among varenicline users, we found a relative decreased risk of total NPAEs in varenicline users of the general population in psychiatric or non-psychiatric cohorts compared with NRT and no difference for NPAEs between varenicline and NRT users in smaller population with COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042417DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8154988PMC
May 2021

Frailty is associated with in-hospital mortality in older hospitalised COVID-19 patients in the Netherlands: the COVID-OLD study.

Age Ageing 2021 05;50(3):631-640

Department of Internal Medicine, Haga Teaching Hospital, The Hague, the Netherlands.

Background: During the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, older patients had an increased risk of hospitalisation and death. Reports on the association of frailty with poor outcome have been conflicting.

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the independent association between frailty and in-hospital mortality in older hospitalised COVID-19 patients in the Netherlands.

Methods: This was a multicentre retrospective cohort study in 15 hospitals in the Netherlands, including all patients aged ≥70 years, who were hospitalised with clinically confirmed COVID-19 between February and May 2020. Data were collected on demographics, co-morbidity, disease severity and Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality.

Results: A total of 1,376 patients were included (median age 78 years (interquartile range 74-84), 60% male). In total, 499 (38%) patients died during hospital admission. Parameters indicating presence of frailty (CFS 6-9) were associated with more co-morbidities, shorter symptom duration upon presentation (median 4 versus 7 days), lower oxygen demand and lower levels of C-reactive protein. In multivariable analyses, the CFS was independently associated with in-hospital mortality: compared with patients with CFS 1-3, patients with CFS 4-5 had a two times higher risk (odds ratio (OR) 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.0)) and patients with CFS 6-9 had a three times higher risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.8-4.3)).

Conclusions: The in-hospital mortality of older hospitalised COVID-19 patients in the Netherlands was 38%. Frailty was independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality, even though COVID-19 patients with frailty presented earlier to the hospital with less severe symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afab018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929372PMC
May 2021

Myocardial Histopathology in Patients With Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2021 May;77(17):2159-2170

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by multiple pathological features including myocyte hypertrophy, myocyte disarray, and interstitial fibrosis.

Objectives: This study sought to correlate myocardial histopathology with clinical characteristics of patients with obstructive HCM and post-operative outcomes following septal myectomy.

Methods: The authors reviewed the pathological findings of the myocardial specimens from 1,836 patients with obstructive HCM who underwent septal myectomy from 2000 to 2016. Myocyte hypertrophy, myocyte disarray, interstitial fibrosis, and endocardial thickening were graded and analyzed.

Results: The median age at operation was 54.2 years (43.5 to 64.3 years), and 1,067 (58.1%) were men. A weak negative correlation between myocyte disarray and age at surgery was identified (ρ = -0.22; p < 0.001). Myocyte hypertrophy (p < 0.001), myocyte disarray (p < 0.001), and interstitial fibrosis (p < 0.001) were positively associated with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Interstitial fibrosis (p < 0.001) and endocardial thickening (p < 0.001) were associated with atrial fibrillation pre-operatively. In the Cox survival model, older age (p < 0.001), lower degree of myocyte hypertrophy (severe vs. mild hazard ratio: 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.19 to 0.86; p = 0.040), and lower degree of endocardial thickening (moderate vs. mild hazard ratio: 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.58 to 0.97; p = 0.019) were independently associated with worse post-myectomy survival. Among 256 patients who had genotype analysis, patients with pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants (n = 62) had a greater degree of myocyte disarray (42% vs. 15% vs. 20%; p = 0.022). Notably, 13 patients with pathogenic or likely pathogenic genetic variants of HCM had no myocyte disarray.

Conclusions: Histopathology was associated with clinical manifestations including the age of disease onset and arrhythmias. Myocyte hypertrophy and endocardial thickening were negatively associated with post-myectomy mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2021.03.008DOI Listing
May 2021

Effects of Genotypes and Treatment on Oxygenscan Parameters in Sickle Cell Disease.

Cells 2021 Apr 5;10(4). Epub 2021 Apr 5.

Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité (LIBM) EA7424, Team « Vascular Biology and Red Blood Cell », Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69008 Lyon, France.

(1) Background: The aim of the present study was to compare oxygen gradient ektacytometry parameters between sickle cell patients of different genotypes (SS, SC, and S/β) or under different treatments (hydroxyurea or chronic red blood cell exchange). (2) Methods: Oxygen gradient ektacytometry was performed in 167 adults and children at steady state. In addition, five SS patients had oxygenscan measurements at steady state and during an acute complication requiring hospitalization. (3) Results: Red blood cell (RBC) deformability upon deoxygenation (EImin) and in normoxia (EImax) was increased, and the susceptibility of RBC to sickle upon deoxygenation was decreased in SC patients when compared to untreated SS patients older than 5 years old. SS patients under chronic red blood cell exchange had higher EImin and EImax and lower susceptibility of RBC to sickle upon deoxygenation compared to untreated SS patients, SS patients younger than 5 years old, and hydroxyurea-treated SS and SC patients. The susceptibility of RBC to sickle upon deoxygenation was increased in the five SS patients during acute complication compared to steady state, although the difference between steady state and acute complication was variable from one patient to another. (4) Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that oxygen gradient ektacytometry parameters are affected by sickle cell disease (SCD) genotype and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10040811DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8067408PMC
April 2021