Publications by authors named "J Malda"

166 Publications

Topographic features of nano-pores within the osteochondral interface and their effects on transport properties -a 3D imaging and modeling study.

J Biomech 2021 May 11;123:110504. Epub 2021 May 11.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.

Recent insights suggest that the osteochondral interface plays a central role in maintaining healthy articulating joints. Uncovering the underlying transport mechanisms is key to the understanding of the cross-talk between articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Here, we describe the mechanisms that facilitate transport at the osteochondral interface. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we found a continuous transition of mineralization architecture from the non-calcified cartilage towards the calcified cartilage. This refurbishes the classical picture of the so-called tidemark; a well-defined discontinuity at the osteochondral interface. Using focused-ion-beam SEM (FIB-SEM) on one osteochondral plug derived from a human cadaveric knee, we elucidated that the pore structure gradually varies from the calcified cartilage towards the subchondral bone plate. We identified nano-pores with radius of 10.71 ± 6.45 nm in calcified cartilage to 39.1 ± 26.17 nm in the subchondral bone plate. The extracted pore sizes were used to construct 3D pore-scale numerical models to explore the effect of pore sizes and connectivity among different pores. Results indicated that connectivity of nano-pores in calcified cartilage is highly compromised compared to the subchondral bone plate. Flow simulations showed a permeability decrease by about 2000-fold and solute transport simulations using a tracer (iodixanol, 1.5 kDa with a free diffusivity of 2.5 × 10 m/s) showed diffusivity decrease by a factor of 1.5. Taken together, architecture of the nano-pores and the complex mineralization pattern in the osteochondral interface considerably impacts the cross-talk between cartilage and bone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2021.110504DOI Listing
May 2021

Dual-contrast computed tomography enables detection of equine posttraumatic osteoarthritis in vitro.

J Orthop Res 2021 May 12. Epub 2021 May 12.

Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

To prevent the progression of posttraumatic osteoarthritis, assessment of cartilage composition is critical for effective treatment planning. Posttraumatic changes include proteoglycan (PG) loss and elevated water content. Quantitative dual-energy computed tomography (QDECT) provides a means to diagnose these changes. Here, we determine the potential of QDECT to evaluate tissue quality surrounding cartilage lesions in an equine model, hypothesizing that QDECT allows detection of posttraumatic degeneration by providing quantitative information on PG and water contents based on the partitions of cationic and nonionic agents in a contrast mixture. Posttraumatic osteoarthritic samples were obtained from a cartilage repair study in which full-thickness chondral defects were created surgically in both stifles of seven Shetland ponies. Control samples were collected from three nonoperated ponies. The experimental (n = 14) and control samples (n = 6) were immersed in the contrast agent mixture and the distributions of the agents were determined at various diffusion time points. As a reference, equilibrium moduli, dynamic moduli, and PG content were measured. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in partitions between the experimental and control samples were demonstrated with cationic contrast agent at 30 min, 60 min, and 20 h, and with non-ionic agent at 60 and 120 min. Significant Spearman's rank correlations were obtained at 20 and 24 h (ρ = 0.482-0.693) between the partition of cationic contrast agent, cartilage biomechanical properties, and PG content. QDECT enables evaluation of posttraumatic changes surrounding a lesion and quantification of PG content, thus advancing the diagnostics of the extent and severity of cartilage injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.25066DOI Listing
May 2021

Biofabrication of a shape-stable auricular structure for the reconstruction of ear deformities.

Mater Today Bio 2021 Jan 21;9:100094. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, 3584 CX, the Netherlands.

Bioengineering of the human auricle remains a significant challenge, where the complex and unique shape, the generation of high-quality neocartilage, and shape preservation are key factors. Future regenerative medicine-based approaches for auricular cartilage reconstruction will benefit from a smart combination of various strategies. Our approach to fabrication of an ear-shaped construct uses hybrid bioprinting techniques, a recently identified progenitor cell population, previously validated biomaterials, and a smart scaffold design. Specifically, we generated a 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold via fused deposition modeling, photocrosslinked a human auricular cartilage progenitor cell-laden gelatin methacryloyl (gelMA) hydrogel within the scaffold, and cultured the bioengineered structure in chondrogenic media for 30 days. Our results show that the fabrication process maintains the viability and chondrogenic phenotype of the cells, that the compressive properties of the combined PCL and gelMA hybrid auricular constructs are similar to native auricular cartilage, and that biofabricated hybrid auricular structures exhibit excellent shape fidelity compared with the 3D digital model along with deposition of cartilage-like matrix in both peripheral and central areas of the auricular structure. Our strategy affords an anatomically enhanced auricular structure with appropriate mechanical properties, ensures adequate preservation of the auricular shape during a dynamic culture period, and enables chondrogenically potent progenitor cells to produce abundant cartilage-like matrix throughout the auricular construct. The combination of smart scaffold design with 3D bioprinting and cartilage progenitor cells holds promise for the development of clinically translatable regenerative medicine strategies for auricular reconstruction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mtbio.2021.100094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7903133PMC
January 2021

Topographic Guidance in Melt-Electrowritten Tubular Scaffolds Enhances Engineered Kidney Tubule Performance.

Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2020 18;8:617364. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.

To date, tubular tissue engineering relies on large, non-porous tubular scaffolds (Ø > 2 mm) for mechanical self-support, or smaller (Ø 150-500 μm) tubes within bulk hydrogels for studying renal transport phenomena. To advance the engineering of kidney tubules for future implantation, constructs should be both self-supportive and yet small-sized and highly porous. Here, we hypothesize that the fabrication of small-sized porous tubular scaffolds with a highly organized fibrous microstructure by means of melt-electrowriting (MEW) allows the development of self-supported kidney proximal tubules with enhanced properties. A custom-built melt-electrowriting (MEW) device was used to fabricate tubular fibrous scaffolds with small diameter sizes (Ø = 0.5, 1, 3 mm) and well-defined, porous microarchitectures (rhombus, square, and random). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cells (ciPTEC) were seeded into the tubular scaffolds and tested for monolayer formation, integrity, and organization, as well as for extracellular matrix (ECM) production and renal transport functionality. Tubular fibrous scaffolds were successfully manufactured by fine control of MEW instrument parameters. A minimum inner diameter of 1 mm and pore sizes of 0.2 mm were achieved and used for subsequent cell experiments. While HUVEC were unable to bridge the pores, ciPTEC formed tight monolayers in all scaffold microarchitectures tested. Well-defined rhombus-shaped pores outperformed and facilitated unidirectional cell orientation, increased collagen type IV deposition, and expression of the renal transporters and differentiation markers organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Here, we present smaller diameter engineered kidney tubules with microgeometry-directed cell functionality. Due to the well-organized tubular fiber scaffold microstructure, the tubes are mechanically self-supported, and the self-produced ECM constitutes the only barrier between the inner and outer compartment, facilitating rapid and active solute transport.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2020.617364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7848123PMC
January 2021

Response.

Cartilage 2021 Jan 19:1947603521989486. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1947603521989486DOI Listing
January 2021