Publications by authors named "J Javier Soldevilla-Agreda"

19 Publications

Conceptual Framework for Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis Based on Scoping Review and Expert Consensus Process.

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2021 May-Jun 01;48(3):239-250

Manuel Rodríguez-Palma, PhD, MSN, RN, Nursing Home "José Matía Calvo," Cádiz, Spain; and Executive Member of Spanish Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel.

Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) has been studied over the last decades, but gaps in the knowledge related to its identification, etiological agents, and risk factors remain. We carried out a scoping review about IAD that included systematic reviews, experimental, and observational studies about IAD and its potential risk factors. We retrieved 24 articles that described 100 potential risk factors and which were synthesized by the authors and proposed to a panel of experts. Panelists used a structured process of consensus development to create a conceptual framework of factors associated with IAD. This framework proposes that liquid fecal material, when combined with exposure to urine and stool, and bacterial contaminated urine are etiological factors for development of IAD. The framework also proposes 2 pathophysiological mechanisms and 8 main risk factors for IAD development. The proposed model could improve the quality of care for patients with or at risk of IAD, assisting healthcare professionals to identify at-risk patients, diagnose the type of lesion, and establish adequate and effective prevention and treatment measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000754DOI Listing
May 2021

Specialised wound care clinics in Spain: distribution and characteristics.

J Wound Care 2020 Dec;29(12):764-775

Servicio Riojano de Salud, Consultorio de Ausejo, La Rioja, Spain.

Objective: To determine the number of specialised wound care units/clinics (SWCUs) in Spain, at present, and to describe their most important characteristics.

Method: This was an observational study with a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional, multicentre approach, where the studied population consisted of SWCUs in Spain. A specific data-collection questionnaire was designed using a modified Delphi method, consisting of four rounds, with the collaboration of 10 wound experts. The final questionnaire included 49 items distributed across four dimensions/areas with a content validity index (CVI-Total for pertinence=0.96 and CVI-Total for relevance=0.94.

Results: A total of 42 SWCUs were included in the study. Most SWCUs were based in hospitals (n=15, 35.7%) or healthcare centres, covering a specific healthcare area (n=17, 40.5%). SWCU coordinators were primarily nurses (n=33, 78.6%). Staff members' professions in SWCUs included registered nurses (n=38 units, 92.7%), nursing assistants (n=8 units, 19.5%), podiatrists (n=8 units, 19.5%), vascular surgeons (n=7 units, 17%), osteopaths (n=2 units, 4.8%) and medical doctors from different specialties (n=3 units, 7.2%). For wound aetiology, the most prevalent wounds managed were diabetic foot ulcers (n=38 units, 90.5%), followed by venous leg ulcers (n=36 units, 85.7%) and arterial ischaemic ulcers (n=36 units, 85.7%). A statistically significant association was found between the number of staff members in a SWCU and the existence of resistance/opposition barriers when developing a SWCU (Chi-square test, p=0.049; Cramér's V=0.34; 34%), as well as between resistance/opposition barriers when developing a SWCU and a nurse as coordinator of a SWCU (MacNemar test, p=0.007, Cramér's V=0.35; 35%).

Conclusion: The typical SWCU implemented in Spain is located in a hospital or integrated in a healthcare structure that offers coverage to a whole health area and providing services for people with hard-to-heal wounds (wound management and prevention) and health professionals (advice, consultancy and training/education). Despite the growing number of SWCUs in Spain, the future of this new organisational model is uncertain, as there can be barriers to creating them and some deficiencies, such as low staff numbers, which need to be addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2020.29.12.764DOI Listing
December 2020

[Not Available].

Rev Enferm 2016 Apr;39(4):6-7

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April 2016

Classification of dependence-related skin lesions: a new proposal.

J Wound Care 2016 Jan;25(1):26, 28-32

Executive Member of Spanish Pressure Ulcers and Chronic Wounds Advisory Panel.

A new theoretical framework on the development of pressure ulcers and other dependence-related lesions requires continued in-depth analysis of their conceptual bases. This study reports the historical background, definitions, and production mechanisms of these lesions, describing the differential pathognomonic features of pressure and/or shear ulcers, moisture-associated skin damage, and lesions from rubbing or friction. It also discusses the combined/multifactorial lesions that can be found in the clinical setting. Finally, it presents the new classification of these lesions proposed by the Spanish Pressure Ulcers and Chronic Wounds Advisory Panel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2016.25.1.26DOI Listing
January 2016

A Spanish May.

J Wound Care 2014 May;23(5):209

Director of GNEAUPP, Professor of Nursing School, University of La Rioja, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/jowc.2014.23.5.209DOI Listing
May 2014