Publications by authors named "J Herbert Waite"

434 Publications

Nanolattice-Forming Hybrid Collagens in Protective Shark Egg Cases.

Biomacromolecules 2022 07 24;23(7):2878-2890. Epub 2022 Jun 24.

Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, United States.

Nanoscopic structural control with long-range ordering remains a profound challenge in nanomaterial fabrication. The nanoarchitectured egg cases of elasmobranchs rely on a hierarchically ordered latticework for their protective function─serving as an exemplary system for nanoscale self-assembly. Although the proteinaceous precursors are known to undergo intermediate liquid crystalline phase transitions before being structurally arrested in the final nanolattice architecture, their sequences have so far remained unknown. By leveraging RNA-seq and proteomic techniques, we identified a cohort of nanolattice-forming proteins comprising a collagenous midblock flanked by domains typically associated with innate immunity and network-forming collagens. Structurally homologous proteins were found in the genomes of other egg-case-producing cartilaginous fishes, suggesting a conserved molecular self-assembly strategy. The identity and stabilizing role of cross-links were subsequently elucidated using mass spectrometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. Our findings provide a new design approach for protein-based liquid crystalline elastomers and the self-assembly of nanolattices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.biomac.2c00341DOI Listing
July 2022

The behavioral phenotype of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: A scoping review of the literature.

Am J Med Genet A 2022 Sep 21;188(9):2536-2554. Epub 2022 Jun 21.

School of Psychology, College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.

Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a rare genetic syndrome associated with growth delay, phenotypic facial characteristics, microcephaly, developmental delay, broad thumbs, and big toes. Most research on RTS has focused on the genotype and physical phenotype; however, several studies have described behavioral, cognitive, social, and emotional characteristics, elucidating the behavioral phenotype of RTS. The reporting of this review was informed by PRISMA guidelines. A systematic search of CINAHL, Medline, and PsychINFO was carried out in March 2021 to identify group studies describing behavioral, cognitive, emotional, psychiatric, and social characteristics in RTS. The studies were quality appraised. Characteristics reported include repetitive behavior, behaviors that challenge, intellectual disability, mental health difficulties, autism characteristics, and heightened sociability. Findings were largely consistent across studies, indicating that many characteristics are likely to form part of the behavioral phenotype of RTS. However, methodological limitations, such as a lack of appropriate comparison groups and inconsistency in measurement weaken these conclusions. There is a need for multi-disciplinary studies, combining genetic and psychological measurement expertise within single research studies. Recommendations are made for future research studies in RTS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62867DOI Listing
September 2022

Prevalence of anxiety symptomatology and diagnosis in syndromic intellectual disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Neurosci Biobehav Rev 2022 07 2;138:104719. Epub 2022 Jun 2.

The School of Psychology, College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, UK. Electronic address:

Individuals with syndromic intellectual disability are at increased risk of experiencing anxiety. Comparing prevalence estimates of anxiety will allow the identification of at-risk groups and inform causal pathways of anxiety. No known study has explored estimates of anxiety symptomatology and diagnosis, including specific anxiety profiles, across groups whilst accounting for methodological quality of studies. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to fill this gap. Prior to review completion, methodology and analysis plans were registered and documented in a protocol (CRD42019123561). Data from 83 papers, involving a pooled sample of 13,708 across eight syndromes were synthesised using a random effects model. Anxiety prevalence ranged from 9 % (95 % CI: 4-14) in Down syndrome to 73% in Rett syndrome (95 % CI: 70-77). Anxiety prevalence across syndromic intellectual disability was higher than for intellectual disability of mixed aetiology and general population estimates. Substantial variability between syndromes identified groups at higher risk than others. The identification of high-risk groups is crucial for early intervention, allowing us to refine models of risk and identify divergent profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2022.104719DOI Listing
July 2022

Predictive factors of academic success in neuromusculoskeletal anatomy among doctor of physical therapy students.

Anat Sci Educ 2022 Jun 2. Epub 2022 Jun 2.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.

Predictors of academic success in anatomy have been studied, but not in Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. The objectives of this study were to (1) explore predictors of academic success in a DPT anatomy course, (2) evaluate sex-based differences in the predictors of academic success and their influence on anatomy course grade, and (3) investigate the influence of the DPT anatomy course on visual-spatial ability. Forty-nine DPT students completed a demographic questionnaire, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI), and Mental Rotations Test (MRT) before the ten-week anatomy course (MRT-1) and repeated the MRT at the end of the course (MRT-2). Anatomy course grade was determined based on quizzes and written and practical examinations. Multiple regression analysis showed significant associations between the predictor variables age (p = 0.010) and the LASSI anxiety subscale (p = 0.017), which measures anxiety coping, with the anatomy course grade. On the MRT-1, male DPT students attempted and correctly answered more questions than females (both, p < 0.0001). Female students had higher LASSI self-regulation and use of academic resources subscale scores (both, p < 0.05). In the 44 DPT students that completed the MRT-2, the number of correct and attempted responses increased following the anatomy course (p < 0.0001). Age and anxiety coping, but not sex, are predictors of anatomy course grades in DPT students. Mental rotations test scores improved following the anatomy course. The LASSI should be used in other cohorts to identify students with low anxiety subscale scores in order to provide targeted support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.2202DOI Listing
June 2022

CGRP Administration Into the Cerebellum Evokes Light Aversion, Tactile Hypersensitivity, and Nociceptive Squint in Mice.

Front Pain Res (Lausanne) 2022 25;3:861598. Epub 2022 Apr 25.

Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.

The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a major player in migraine pathophysiology. Previous preclinical studies demonstrated that intracerebroventricular administration of CGRP caused migraine-like behaviors in mice, but the sites of action in the brain remain unidentified. The cerebellum has the most CGRP binding sites in the central nervous system and is increasingly recognized as both a sensory and motor integration center. The objective of this study was to test whether the cerebellum, particularly the medial cerebellar nuclei (MN), might be a site of CGRP action. In this study, CGRP was directly injected into the right MN of C57BL/6J mice via a cannula. A battery of tests was done to assess preclinical behaviors that are surrogates of migraine-like symptoms. CGRP caused light aversion measured as decreased time in the light zone even with dim light. The mice also spent more time resting in the dark zone, but not the light, along with decreased rearing and transitions between zones. These behaviors were similar for both sexes. Moreover, significant responses to CGRP were seen in the open field assay, von Frey test, and automated squint assay, indicating anxiety, tactile hypersensitivity, and spontaneous pain, respectively. Interestingly, CGRP injection caused significant anxiety and spontaneous pain responses only in female mice, and a more robust tactile hypersensitivity in female mice. No detectable effect of CGRP on gait was observed in either sex. These results suggest that CGRP injection in the MN causes light aversion accompanied by increased anxiety, tactile hypersensitivity, and spontaneous pain. A caveat is that we cannot exclude contributions from other cerebellar regions in addition to the MN due to diffusion of the injected peptide. These results reveal the cerebellum as a new site of CGRP actions that may contribute to migraine-like hypersensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpain.2022.861598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9082264PMC
April 2022
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