Publications by authors named "J Hamdi"

28 Publications

Investigation of Post Vaccination Reactions of Two Live Attenuated Vaccines against Lumpy Skin Disease of Cattle.

Vaccines (Basel) 2021 Jun 8;9(6). Epub 2021 Jun 8.

MCI Santé Animale, Mohammedia 28810, Morocco.

Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) causes an economically important disease in cattle. The only method for successful control is early diagnosis and efficient vaccination. Adverse effects of vaccination such as local inflammation at the injection site and localized or generalized skin lesions in some vaccinated animals have been reported with live vaccines. The aim of this work was to compare the safety of two lumpy skin disease (LSD) vaccine strains, Kenyan (Kn) Sheep and Goat Pox (KSGP O-240) and LSDV Neethling (Nt) strain, and to determine the etiology of the post-vaccination (pv) reactions observed in cattle. Experimental cattle were vaccinated under controlled conditions with Nt- and KSGP O-240-based vaccines, using two different doses, and animals were observed for 3 months for any adverse reactions. Three out of 45 cattle vaccinated with LSDV Nt strain (6.7%) and three out of 24 cattle vaccinated with Kn strain (12.5%) presented LSD-like skin nodules, providing evidence that the post-vaccination lesions may not be strain-dependent. Lesions appeared 1-3 weeks after vaccination and were localized in the neck or covering the whole body. Animals recovered after 3 weeks. There is a positive correlation between the vaccine dose and the appearance of skin lesions in vaccinated animals; at the 105 dose, 12% of the animals reacted versus 3.7% at the 104 dose. Both strains induced solid immunity when protection was measured by neutralizing antibody seroconversion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060621DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8226854PMC
June 2021

In-vitro and in-vivo study of the interference between Rift Valley fever virus (clone 13) and Sheeppox/Limpy Skin disease viruses.

Sci Rep 2021 Jun 11;11(1):12395. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

R&D Virology, MCI Santé Animale, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC), B.P. 278, 28810, Mohammedia, Morocco.

Viral interference is a common occurrence that has been reported in cell culture in many cases. In the present study, viral interference between two capripox viruses (sheeppox SPPV and lumpy skin disease virus LSDV in cattle) with Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) was investigated in vitro and in their natural hosts, sheep and cattle. A combination of SPPV/RVFV and LSDV/RVFV was used to co-infect susceptible cells and animals to detect potential competition. In-vitro interference was evaluated by estimating viral infectivity and copies of viral RNA by a qPCR during three serial passages in cell cultures, whereas in-vivo interference was assessed through antibody responses to vaccination. When lamb testis primary cells were infected with the mixture of capripox and RVFV, the replication of both SPPV and LSDV was inhibited by RVFV. In animals, SPPV/RVFV or LSDV/RVFV combinations inhibited the replication SPPV and LSDV and the antibody response following vaccination. The combined SPPV/RVFV did not protect sheep after challenging with the virulent strain of SPPV and the LSDV/RVFV did not induce interferon Gamma to LSDV, while immunological response to RVFV remain unaffected. Our goal was to assess this interference response to RVFV/capripoxviruses' coinfection in order to develop effective combined live-attenuated vaccines as a control strategy for RVF and SPP/LSD diseases. Our findings indicated that this approach was not suitable for developing a combined SPPV/LSDV/RVFV vaccine candidate because of interference of replication and the immune response among these viruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-91926-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8196192PMC
June 2021

Capripoxvirus Infections in Ruminants: A Review.

Microorganisms 2021 Apr 23;9(5). Epub 2021 Apr 23.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Contagious Diseases, Agronomic and Veterinary Institute Hassan II, Madinat Al Irfane, Rabat 6202, Morocco.

Lumpy skin disease, sheeppox, and goatpox are notifiable diseases of cattle, sheep, and goats, respectively, caused by viruses of the Capripoxvirus genus. They are responsible for both direct and indirect financial losses. These losses arise through animal mortality, morbidity cost of vaccinations, and constraints to animals and animal products' trade. Control and eradication of capripoxviruses depend on early detection of outbreaks, vector control, strict animal movement, and vaccination which remains the most effective means of control. To date, live attenuated vaccines are widely used; however, conferred protection remains controversial. Many vaccines have been associated with adverse reactions and incomplete protection in sheep, goats, and cattle. Many combination- and recombinant-based vaccines have also been developed. Here, we review capripoxvirus infections and the immunity conferred against capripoxviruses by their respective vaccines for each ruminant species. We also review their related cross protection to heterologous infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9050902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8145859PMC
April 2021

Experimental infection of indigenous North African goats with goatpox virus.

Acta Vet Scand 2021 Mar 4;63(1). Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Department of Research and Development, Multi-Chemical Industry Santé Animale, Lot. 157, Z I, Sud-Ouest (ERAC) B.P.: 278, 28810, Mohammedia, Morocco.

Background: Goatpox is a viral disease caused by infection with goatpox virus (GTPV) of the genus Capripoxvirus, Poxviridae family. Capripoxviruses cause serious disease to livestock and contribute to huge economic losses. Goatpox and sheeppox are endemic to Africa, particularly north of the Equator, the Middle East and many parts of Asia. GTPV and sheeppox virus are considered host-specific; however, both strains can cause clinical disease in either goats or sheep with more severe disease in the homologous species and mild or sub-clinical infection in the other. Goatpox has never been reported in Morocco, Algeria or Tunisia despite the huge population of goats living in proximity with sheep in those countries. To evaluate the susceptibility and pathogenicity of indigenous North African goats to GTPV infection, we experimentally inoculated eight locally bred goats with a virulent Vietnamese isolate of GTPV. Two uninfected goats were kept as controls. Clinical examination was carried out daily and blood was sampled for virology and for investigating the antibody response. After necropsy, tissues were collected and assessed for viral DNA using real-time PCR.

Results: Following the experimental infection, all inoculated goats displayed clinical signs characteristic of goatpox including varying degrees of hyperthermia, loss of appetite, inactivity and cutaneous lesions. The infection severely affected three of the infected animals while moderate to mild disease was noticed in the remaining goats. A high antibody response was developed. High viral DNA loads were detected in skin crusts and nodules, and subcutaneous tissue at the injection site with cycle threshold (Ct) values ranging from 14.6 to 22.9, while lower viral loads were found in liver and lung (Ct = 35.7 and 35.1). The results confirmed subcutaneous tropism of the virus.

Conclusion: Clinical signs of goatpox were reproduced in indigenous North African goats and confirmed a high susceptibility of the North African goat breed to GTPV infection. A clinical scoring system is proposed that can be applied in GTPV vaccine efficacy studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13028-021-00574-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931584PMC
March 2021

Genome-wide analysis of gene family in the Mediterranean olive ( subsp. ) provides insight into structural patterns, evolution and functional diversity.

Physiol Mol Biol Plants 2020 Nov 19;26(11):2301-2318. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Laboratoire LR11ES41 Génétique, Biodiversité & Valorisation des Bioressources, Institut Supérieur de Biotechnologie de Monastir, Université de Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia.

Plants regularly experience multiple abiotic and biotic pressures affecting their normal development. The 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) plays a dynamic role in countering abiotic and biotic stresses via a plethora of functional mechanisms. The HSP90 has been investigated in many plant species. However, there is little information available about this gene family in the cultivated Mediterranean olive tree, subsp. var. . In the current study, we systematically performed genome-wide identification and characterization of the HSP90 gene family in var. (OeHSP90s). Twelve regular OeHSP90s were identified, which were phylogenetically grouped into two major clusters and four sub-clusters, showing five paralogous gene pairs evolving under purifying selection. All of the 12 proteins contained a Histidine kinase-like ATPase (HATPase_c) domain, justifying the role played by HSP90 proteins in ATP binding and hydrolysis. The predicted 3D structure of OeHSP90 proteins provided information to understand their functions at the biochemical level. Consistent with their phylogenetic relationships, OeHSP90 members were predicted to be localized in different cellular compartments, suggesting their involvement in various subcellular processes. In consonance with their spatial organization, olive HSP90 family members were found to share similar motif arrangements and similar number of exons. We found that OeHSP90 promoters contained various cis-acting elements associated with light responsiveness, hormone signaling pathways and reaction to various stress conditions. In addition, expression sequence tags (ESTs) analysis offered a view of OeHSP90 tissue- and developmental stage specific pattern of expression. Proteins interacting with OeHSP90s were predicted and their potential roles were discussed. Overall, our results offer premises for further investigation of the implication of genes in the physiological processes of the olive and its adaptation to stresses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12298-020-00888-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7688888PMC
November 2020