Publications by authors named "J H M de Vries"

2,734 Publications

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Evaluating Community Engagement Strategies to Manage Stigma in Two African Genomics Studies Involving People Living with Schizophrenia or Rheumatic Heart Disease.

Glob Health Epidemiol Genom 2021 26;2021:9926495. Epub 2021 Jun 26.

Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

In global health research and genomics research specifically, community engagement has gained prominence in enhancing ethical conduct, particularly in managing the risk of stigmatization, but there is minimal scientific evidence on how to do this effectively. This article reports on community engagement evaluation strategies in two African genomics studies: the Stigma in African Genomics Research study and the Genomics of Schizophrenia in South African Xhosa People (SAX) study. Within the Stigma in African Genomics Research study, a self-report rating scale and open-ended questions were used to track participant responses to an experiential theatre workshop. The workshop focused on participant experiences of living with schizophrenia or rheumatic heart disease (RHD). While the schizophrenia group reported more alienation and less stigma resistance than the RHD group, both groups demonstrated increased stigma resistance over time, after participating in the workshops. Hearing from others living with and managing the same illness normalised participants' own experiences and encouraged them. Within the SAX study, a short rating scale and qualitative feedback methods were used to evaluate a Mental Health Literacy Day targeting mental health stigma. Information talks about (i) the symptoms of schizophrenia and treatment options and (ii) the illness experiences of a patient in recovery were rated as the most helpful on the day. Audience members reported that these talks challenged negative perceptions about severe mental illness. Three important learnings emerged from these evaluations: firstly, integration of evaluation strategies at the research study planning phase is likely to promote more effective community engagement. Secondly, a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods that draw on simple descriptive statistics and thematic analysis can provide nuanced perspectives about the value of community engagement. Thirdly, such evidence is necessary in establishing and promoting the science of community engagement in genomics research and health research more broadly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/9926495DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8415068PMC
June 2021

The accuracy of gap and step-off measurements in acetabular fracture treatment.

Sci Rep 2021 Sep 14;11(1):18294. Epub 2021 Sep 14.

Department of Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The assessment of gaps and steps in acetabular fractures is challenging. Data from various imaging techniques to enable accurate quantification of acetabular fracture displacement are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of pelvic radiographs, intraoperative fluoroscopy, and computed tomography (CT) in detecting gaps and step-offs in acetabular fractures. Sixty patients, surgically treated for acetabular fractures, were included. Five observers (5400 measurements) measured the gaps and step-offs on radiographs and CT scans. Intraoperative fluoroscopy images were reassessed for the presence of gaps and/or step-offs. Preoperatively, 25% of the gaps and 40% of the step-offs were undetected on radiographs compared to CT. Postoperatively, 52% of the gaps and 80% of the step-offs were missed on radiographs compared to CT. Radiograph analysis led to a significantly smaller gap and step-off compared to the CT measurements, an underestimation by a factor of two. Approximately 70% of the residual gaps and step-offs was not detected using intraoperative fluoroscopy. Gaps and step-offs that exceed the critical cut-off indicating worse prognosis often remained undetected on radiographs compared to CT scans. Less-experienced observers tend to overestimate gaps and step-offs compared to the more-experienced observers. In acetabular fracture treatment, gaps and step-offs were often undetected and underestimated on radiographs and intraoperative fluoroscopy in comparison with CT scans. This means that CT is superior to radiographs in detecting acetabular fracture displacement, which is clinically relevant for patient counselling regarding treatment decisions and prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-97837-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8440593PMC
September 2021

Endograft apposition and infrarenal neck enlargement after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino) 2021 Sep 14. Epub 2021 Sep 14.

Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Sufficient apposition and oversizing of the endograft in the aortic neck are both essential for durable endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). These measures are however not regularly stated on post-EVAR computed tomography angiography (CTA) scan reports. In this study endograft apposition and neck enlargement (NE) after EVAR with an Endurant II(s) endograft were analyzed and associated with supra- and infrarenal aortic neck morphology.

Methods: In 97 consecutive elective patients, the aortic neck morphology was measured on the pre-EVAR CTA scan on a 3mensio vascular workstation. The distance between the lowest renal artery and the proximal edge of the fabric (shortest fabric distance, SFD), and the shortest length of circumferential apposition between endograft and aortic wall (shortest apposition length, SAL) was determined on the early post-EVAR CTA scan. NE, defined as the aortic diameter change between pre- and post-EVAR CTA scan, was determined at eight levels: +40, +30, +20, +15, +10, 0, -5 and -10 mm relative to the lowest renal artery baseline. The aortic neck diameter and preoperative oversizing were correlated to NE with the Pearson correlation coefficient. The effective post-EVAR endograft oversizing is calculated from the nominal endograft diameter and the post-EVAR neck diameter where the endograft is circumferentially apposed.

Results: The median time (interquartile range, IQR) between the EVAR procedure and the pre- and post-EVAR CTA scan was 40 (25, 71) days and 36 (30, 46) days, respectively. The Endurant II(s) endograft was deployed with a median (IQR) SFD of 1.0 (0.0, 3.0) mm. The SAL was <10 mm in 9% of patients and significantly influenced by the pre-EVAR aortic neck length (p=0.001), hostile neck shape (p=0.017), and maximum curvature at the suprarenal aorta (p=0.039). The median (interquartile range) SAL was 21.0 (15.0, 27.0) mm with a median (IQR) pre-EVAR infrarenal neck length of 23.5 (13.0, 34.8) mm. The median (IQR) difference between the SAL and neck length was -5.0 (-12.0, 2.8) mm. Significant (p<.001) NE of 1.7 (0.9, 2.5) mm was observed 5 mm below the renal artery baseline, which resulted in an effective post-EVAR endograft oversizing <10% in 43% of the patients. No correlation was found between NE and aortic neck diameter or preoperative oversizing.

Conclusions: Circumferential apposition between an endograft and the infrarenal aortic neck, SAL, and NE can be derived from standard postoperative CT scans. These variables provide essential information about the post-procedural endograft and aortic neck morphology regardless of the preoperative measurements. Patients with SAL <10 mm or effective oversizing <10% due to NE may benefit from intensified follow-up, but clinical consequences of SAL and NE should be evaluated in future longitudinal studies with longer term follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0021-9509.21.11972-XDOI Listing
September 2021

Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS): an overview of the definition, aetiology, risk factors, and possible counselling and treatment strategies.

Expert Rev Neurother 2021 Sep 14. Epub 2021 Sep 14.

Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Elisabeth-Tweesteden Hospital, Tilburg, the Netherlands.

IntroductionThe post-intensive care syndrome (PICS) has only recently been recognized as a new clinical entity in patients surviving their intensive care unit (ICU) stay due to critical illness. With increasing survival rates of ICU patients worldwide, there is a rising interest regarding post-ICU recovery.Areas coveredFirst, based on current literature a definition is provided of PICS, including the domains of impairments that comprise PICS along with the aetiology and risk factors. Second, preventive measures and possible treatment strategies integrated in the follow-up care are described. Third, the authors will discuss the current SARS-Cov-2 pandemic and the increased risk of PICS in these post-ICU patients and their families.Expert opinionPICS is a relatively new entity, which not only encompasses various physical, cognitive, and psychological impairments, but also impact global health due to long-lasting detrimental socioeconomic burdens. Importantly, PICS also relates to caregivers of post-ICU patients. Strategies to decrease this burden will not only be needed within the ICU setting but will also have to take place in an interdisciplinary, multifaceted approach in primary care settings. Additionally, the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic has a high burden on post-ICU patients and their relatives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737175.2021.1981289DOI Listing
September 2021

Chemical upcycling ofpolymers.

Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci 2021 Nov 13;379(2209):20200341. Epub 2021 Sep 13.

Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. (LIKAT Rostock), Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock, Germany.

As the production volume of polymers increases, so does the amount of plastic waste. Plastic recycling is one of the concepts to address in this issue. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of plastic waste is recycled. Even with the development of polymers for closed loop recycling that can be in theory reprocessed infinitely the inherent dilemma is that because of collection, cleaning and separation processes the obtained materials simply are not cost competitive with virgin materials. Chemical upcycling, the conversion of polymers to higher valuable products, either polymeric or monomeric, could mitigate this issue. In the following article, we highlight recent examples in this young but fast-growing field. This article is part of the theme issue 'Bio-derived and bioinspired sustainable advanced materials for emerging technologies (part 2)'.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2020.0341DOI Listing
November 2021
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