Publications by authors named "J Deprest"

696 Publications

Maternal outcomes and risk factors for COVID-19 severity among pregnant women.

Sci Rep 2021 07 6;11(1):13898. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.

Pregnant women may be at higher risk of severe complications associated with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which may lead to obstetrical complications. We performed a case control study comparing pregnant women with severe coronavirus disease 19 (cases) to pregnant women with a milder form (controls) enrolled in the COVI-Preg international registry cohort between March 24 and July 26, 2020. Risk factors for severity, obstetrical and immediate neonatal outcomes were assessed. A total of 926 pregnant women with a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 were included, among which 92 (9.9%) presented with severe COVID-19 disease. Risk factors for severe maternal outcomes were pulmonary comorbidities [aOR 4.3, 95% CI 1.9-9.5], hypertensive disorders [aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0-7.0] and diabetes [aOR2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5]. Pregnant women with severe maternal outcomes were at higher risk of caesarean section [70.7% (n = 53/75)], preterm delivery [62.7% (n = 32/51)] and newborns requiring admission to the neonatal intensive care unit [41.3% (n = 31/75)]. In this study, several risk factors for developing severe complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection among pregnant women were identified including pulmonary comorbidities, hypertensive disorders and diabetes. Obstetrical and neonatal outcomes appear to be influenced by the severity of maternal disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-92357-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8260739PMC
July 2021

'We did everything we could'- a qualitative study exploring the acceptability of maternal-fetal surgery for spina bifida to parents.

Prenat Diagn 2021 Jul 6. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Department of Development and Regeneration Cluster Woman and Child, Biomedical Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Objective: To explore the concepts and strategies parents employ when considering maternal-fetal surgery (MFS) as an option for the management of spina bifida (SB) in their fetus, and how this determines the acceptability of the intervention.

Methods: A two-centre interview study enrolling parents whose fetuses with SB were eligible for MFS. To assess differences in acceptability, parents opting for MFS (n = 24) were interviewed at three different moments in time: prior to the intervention, directly after the intervention and 3-6 months after birth. Parents opting for termination of pregnancy (n = 5) were interviewed only once. Themes were identified and organised in line with the framework of acceptability.

Results: To parents opting for MFS, the intervention was perceived as an opportunity that needed to be taken. Feelings of parental responsibility drove them to do anything in their power to improve their future child's situation. Expectations seemed to be realistic yet were driven by hope for the best outcome. None expressed decisional regret at any stage, despite substantial impact and, at times, disappointing outcomes. For the small group of participants, who decided to opt for termination of pregnancy (TOP), MFS was not perceived as an intervention that substantially could improve the quality of their future child's life.

Conclusion: Prospective parents opting for MFS were driven by their feelings of parental responsibility. They recognise the fetus as their future child and value information and care focusing on optimising the child's future health. In the small group of parents opting for TOP, MFS was felt to offer insufficient certainty of substantial improvement in quality of life and the perceived severe impact of SB drove their decision to end the pregnancy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5996DOI Listing
July 2021

Prenatal cerebellar growth is altered in congenital diaphragmatic hernia on ultrasound.

Prenat Diagn 2021 Jul 3. Epub 2021 Jul 3.

Department of Development and Regeneration, Cluster Woman and Child, Group Biomedical Sciences, KU Leuven University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Objective: Children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Herein we report on prenatal changes in biometry and brain perfusion in fetuses with isolated CDH.

Study Design: This retrospective study evaluated fetuses with isolated, left-sided CDH in three European referral centers. Abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL), head circumference (HC), transcerebellar diameter (TCD), middle cerebral artery (MCA) Doppler, and ventricular width (VW) were assessed during four gestational periods (<24 weeks, 25-28 weeks, 29-32 weeks, >33 weeks). Z-scores were calculated, and growth curves were created based on longitudinal data.

Results: In 367 fetuses, HC, AC and FL were within normal ranges throughout gestation. The TCD diminished with advancing gestational age to fall below the fifth percentile after 32 weeks. A less pronounced but similar trend was seen in VW. The peak systolic velocity of the MCA was consistently approximately 10% lower than normal. Disease severity was correlated to TCD (p = 0.002) and MCA doppler values (p = 0.002). There were no differences between fetuses treated with FETO and those managed expectantly.

Conclusion: Fetuses with isolated left-sided CDH have a small cerebellum and reduced MCA peak systolic velocity. Follow up studies are necessary to determine the impact of these changes on neurodevelopment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pd.5993DOI Listing
July 2021

Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion for congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a narrative review of the history, current practice, and future directions.

Transl Pediatr 2021 May;10(5):1448-1460

Clinical Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Department of Development and Regeneration, Woman and Child, Leuven, Belgium.

Fetal intervention for fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has been investigated for over 30 years and is summarized in this manuscript. The review begins with a discussion of the history of fetal intervention for this severe congenital anomaly beginning with open fetal surgery with repair of the anatomical defect, shifting towards tracheal occlusion via open surgery techniques, and finally fetoscopic endoluminal balloon tracheal occlusion using a percutaneous approach. The current technique of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) is described in detail with steps of the procedure and complementary figures. The main outcomes of single-institutional studies and multiple systematic reviews are examined and discussed. Despite these studies, the fetal community agrees that FETO remains investigational at this time as there is insufficient evidence to recommend it as the standard of care for CDH. A randomized controlled trial, The Tracheal Occlusion to Accelerate Lung Growth (TOTAL) trial, has been designed to attempt to answer this question in an elaborate, international, multi-institutional study and is described in the text. Finally, future directions of fetal intervention for antenatally diagnosed CDH are discussed, including options for non-isolated CDH, the Smart-TO balloon for nonoperative reversal of occlusion, and transplacental sildenafil for treatment of pulmonary hypertension prior to birth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/tp-20-130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8192998PMC
May 2021

Transplacental Transfer and Fetal Pharmacodynamics of Sildenafil in the Pregnant Sheep Model.

Fetal Diagn Ther 2021 Jun 16:1-10. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Department of Development and Regeneration, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor considered for antenatal use for a variety of indications. We sought to assess sildenafil pharmacokinetics in the pregnant ewe and fetus and evaluate its physiological fetal effects.

Methods: Twelve fetal lambs (127-133 days GA, term 145) were chronically catheterized in utero. Ewes received different doses of sildenafil, either via subcutaneous injection (1.6, 2.0 mg/kg/day) or intravenous (IV) infusion (3, 5, 7, 10, and 12 mg/kg/day). Maternal and fetal sildenafil concentrations and metabolic status (blood gas analysis) were measured at given intervals. The fetal heart rate, pulmonary blood flow, systemic and aortic pressure, and maternal uterine artery pressure were continuously monitored.

Results: The transplacental sildenafil transfer was 2.9% (range: 1.4-7.8%), preventing attainment of fetal target concentrations without toxic maternal levels. IV sildenafil infusion induced an immediate, temporary, dose-dependent reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance (38-78%) and increased both pulmonary blood flow (32-132%) and heart rate (13-49%), with limited nonlinear dose-dependent effects on systemic and pulmonary pressures. Fetal and maternal blood gases and maternal uterine artery pressures were unaffected by sildenafil infusion.

Conclusion: In sheep, transplacental transfer of sildenafil is extremely low. Though, minimal fetal sildenafil concentrations induce an acute transient pulmonary vasodilation, well-tolerated by the fetus and ewe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000515435DOI Listing
June 2021