Publications by authors named "J D Heyse"

66 Publications

Cemental tear: An overlooked finding associated with rapid periodontal destruction. A case series.

Aust Dent J 2021 Apr 17. Epub 2021 Apr 17.

Division of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Cemental tear is defined as cementum fragment completely or partially detached from the root surface, and it has been associated with localized rapid periodontal breakdown. Although history of trauma and/or attrition may be risk factors, the etiopathology of cemental tear remains unknown. This case series aims to discuss the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features of cemental tears to aid clinicians in making differential diagnosis. Three teeth from three patients presenting a periradicular lesion underwent an exploratory surgery to determine the cause and provide treatment. Soft and hard tissue biopsies were obtained from each lesion and forwarded for histopathologic evaluation. Two patients received a guided tissue regeneration (GTR) procedure, which allowed the tooth to be retained. One patient received an extraction with simultaneous guided bone regeneration (GBR) due to a hopeless prognosis of the tooth. The results after histopathologic evaluation yielded a final diagnosis of cemental tear for all three patients. Cemental tears may be overlooked, and therefore, they should be included in the differential diagnosis of periapical periodontitis, endodontic-periodontal lesion and vertical root fracture (VRF).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adj.12844DOI Listing
April 2021

Rearing water microbiomes in white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) larviculture assemble stochastically and are influenced by the microbiomes of live feed products.

Environ Microbiol 2021 01 18;23(1):281-298. Epub 2020 Nov 18.

Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology (CMET), Department of Biochemical and Microbial Technology, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, Ghent, 9000, Belgium.

The development of effective management strategies to reduce the occurrence of diseases in aquaculture is hampered by the limited knowledge on the microbial ecology of these systems. In this study, the dynamics and dominant community assembly processes in the rearing water of Litopenaeus vannamei larviculture tanks were determined. Additionally, the contribution of peripheral microbiomes, such as those of live and dry feeds, to the rearing water microbiome were quantified. The community assembly in the hatchery rearing water over time was dominated by stochasticity, which explains the observed heterogeneity between replicate cultivations. The community undergoes two shifts that match with the dynamics of the algal abundances in the rearing water. Source tracking analysis revealed that 37% of all bacteria in the hatchery rearing water were introduced either by the live or dry feeds, or during water exchanges. The contribution of the microbiome from the algae was the largest, followed by that of the Artemia, the exchange water and the dry feeds. Our findings provide fundamental knowledge on the assembly processes and dynamics of rearing water microbiomes and illustrate the crucial role of these peripheral microbiomes in maintaining health-promoting rearing water microbiomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.15310DOI Listing
January 2021

Neutron Capture on the s-Process Branching Point ^{171}Tm via Time-of-Flight and Activation.

Phys Rev Lett 2020 Oct;125(14):142701

Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC), Yavne, Israel.

The neutron capture cross sections of several unstable nuclides acting as branching points in the s process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies. The unstable ^{171}Tm (t_{1/2}=1.92  yr) is part of the branching around mass A∼170 but its neutron capture cross section as a function of the neutron energy is not known to date. In this work, following the production for the first time of more than 5 mg of ^{171}Tm at the high-flux reactor Institut Laue-Langevin in France, a sample was produced at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. Two complementary experiments were carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility (n_TOF) at CERN in Switzerland and at the SARAF liquid lithium target facility at Soreq Nuclear Research Center in Israel by time of flight and activation, respectively. The result of the time-of-flight experiment consists of the first ever set of resonance parameters and the corresponding average resonance parameters, allowing us to make an estimation of the Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS) by extrapolation. The activation measurement provides a direct and more precise measurement of the MACS at 30 keV: 384(40) mb, with which the estimation from the n_TOF data agree at the limit of 1 standard deviation. This value is 2.6 times lower than the JEFF-3.3 and ENDF/B-VIII evaluations, 25% lower than that of the Bao et al. compilation, and 1.6 times larger than the value recommended in the KADoNiS (v1) database, based on the only previous experiment. Our result affects the nucleosynthesis at the A∼170 branching, namely, the ^{171}Yb abundance increases in the material lost by asymptotic giant branch stars, providing a better match to the available pre-solar SiC grain measurements compared to the calculations based on the current JEFF-3.3 model-based evaluation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.125.142701DOI Listing
October 2020

Discriminating Bacterial Phenotypes at the Population and Single-Cell Level: A Comparison of Flow Cytometry and Raman Spectroscopy Fingerprinting.

Cytometry A 2020 07 30;97(7):713-726. Epub 2019 Dec 30.

CMET, Center for Microbial Technology and Ecology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Investigating phenotypic heterogeneity can help to better understand and manage microbial communities. However, characterizing phenotypic heterogeneity remains a challenge, as there is no standardized analysis framework. Several optical tools are available, such as flow cytometry and Raman spectroscopy, which describe optical properties of the individual cell. In this work, we compare Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry to study phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations. The growth stages of three replicate Escherichia coli populations were characterized using both technologies. Our findings show that flow cytometry detects and quantifies shifts in phenotypic heterogeneity at the population level due to its high-throughput nature. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, offers a much higher resolution at the single-cell level (i.e., more biochemical information is recorded). Therefore, it can identify distinct phenotypic populations when coupled with analyses tailored toward single-cell data. In addition, it provides information about biomolecules that are present, which can be linked to cell functionality. We propose a computational workflow to distinguish between bacterial phenotypic populations using Raman spectroscopy and validated this approach with an external data set. We recommend using flow cytometry to quantify phenotypic heterogeneity at the population level, and Raman spectroscopy to perform a more in-depth analysis of heterogeneity at the single-cell level. © 2019 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cyto.a.23952DOI Listing
July 2020

Controlling false discovery proportion in identification of drug-related adverse events from multiple system organ classes.

Stat Med 2019 09 17;38(22):4378-4389. Epub 2019 Jul 17.

Department of Biostatistics, UNC at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Analyzing safety data from clinical trials to detect safety signals worth further examination involves testing multiple hypotheses, one for each observed adverse event (AE) type. There exists certain hierarchical structure for these hypotheses due to the classification of the AEs into system organ classes, and these AEs are also likely correlated. Many approaches have been proposed to identify safety signals under the multiple testing framework and tried to achieve control of false discovery rate (FDR). The FDR control concerns the expectation of the false discovery proportion (FDP). In practice, the control of the actual random variable FDP could be more relevant and has recently drawn much attention. In this paper, we proposed a two-stage procedure for safety signal detection with direct control of FDP, through a permutation-based approach for screening groups of AEs and a permutation-based approach of constructing simultaneous upper bounds for false discovery proportion. Our simulation studies showed that this new approach has controlled FDP. We demonstrate our approach using data sets derived from a drug clinical trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sim.8304DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6731544PMC
September 2019