Publications by authors named "J D Dattelbaum"

32 Publications

Engineering a switch-based biosensor for arginine using a Thermotoga maritima periplasmic binding protein.

Anal Biochem 2017 05 1;525:60-66. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Department of Chemistry, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA, 23173, USA. Electronic address:

The Thermotoga maritima arginine-binding protein (TmArgBP) has been modified to create a reagentless fluorescent protein biosensor. Two design methods for biosensor construction are compared: 1) solvent accessibility of environmentally-sensitive probes and 2) fluorescence deactivation due to photo-induced electron transfer (PET). Nine single cysteine TmArgBP mutants were created and labeled with three different environmentally sensitive fluorescent probes. These mutants demonstrated limited changes in fluorescence emission upon the addition of arginine. In contrast, the PET-based biosensor provides significant enhancements over the traditional approach and provides a fluorescence quenching mechanism that was capable of providing quantitative detection of arginine. Site-directed mutagenesis of TmArgBP was used to create attachment points for the fluorescent probe (K145C) and for an internal aromatic residue (D18X) to serve as the PET quencher. Both tyrosine and tryptophan, but not phenylalanine, were able to quench the emission of the fluorescent probe by more than 80% upon the addition of arginine. The dissociation constant for arginine ranged from 0.87 to 1.5 μM across the different sensors. This PET-based strategy provides a simple and broadly applicable approach for the analytical detection of small molecules that may be applied to any protein that exhibits conformational switching in a ligand dependent manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ab.2017.02.021DOI Listing
May 2017

Proline 235 plays a key role in the regulation of the oligomeric states of Thermotoga maritima Arginine Binding Protein.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2016 Jul 14;1864(7):814-24. Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, I-80134 Napoli, Italy. Electronic address:

The Arginine Binding Protein isolated from Thermotoga maritima (TmArgBP) is a protein endowed with several peculiar properties. We have previously shown that TmArgBP dimerization is a consequence of the swapping of the C-terminal helix. Here we explored the structural determinants of TmArgBP domain swapping and oligomerization. In particular, we report a mutational analysis of the residue Pro235, which is located in the hinge region of the swapping dimer. This residue was either replaced with a Gly-Lys dipeptide (TmArgBP(P235GK)) or a Gly residue (TmArgBP(P235G)). Different forms of these mutants were generated and extensively characterized using biophysical techniques. For both TmArgBP(P235GK) and TmArgBP(P235G) mutants, the occurrence of multiple oligomerization states (monomers, dimers and trimers) was detected. The formation of well-folded monomeric forms for these mutants indicates that the dimerization through C-terminal domain swapping observed in wild-type TmArgBP is driven by conformational restraints imposed by the presence of Pro235 in the hinge region. Molecular dynamics studies corroborate this observation by showing that Gly235 assumes conformational states forbidden for Pro residues in the TmArgBP(P235G) monomer. Unexpectedly, the trimeric forms present: (a) peculiar circular dichroism spectra, (b) a great susceptibility to heating, and (c) the ability to bind the Thioflavin T dye. The present findings clearly demonstrate that single-point mutations have an important impact on the TmArgBP oligomerization process. In a wider context, they also indicate that proteins endowed with an intrinsic propensity to swap have an easy access to states with altered structural and, possibly, functional properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbapap.2016.04.006DOI Listing
July 2016

The Nitrogenous Hamigerans: Unusual Amino Acid-Derivatized Aromatic Diterpenoid Metabolites from the New Zealand Marine Sponge Hamigera tarangaensis.

J Org Chem 2015 Jan 4;80(1):304-12. Epub 2014 Dec 4.

‡Centre for Biodiscovery, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

The NMR-directed isolation and structure elucidation of nine new nitrogenous hamigeran diterpenoids from the New Zealand marine sponge Hamigera tarangaensis are described. Featured in this set are the oxazole-containing hamigeran M (4) and eight compounds (5a-6a and 7a-8c) related to the constitutional structure of hamigeran D (1). Moderate cytotoxicity in the low-micromolar range against the HL-60 promyeloid leukemic cell line is reported for seven of the new compounds. The structural nature of these compounds suggests that their adducts are derived from an amino acid source and has allowed for revision of the configuration about C-18 of the archetypal compound, hamigeran D, from 1a to 1b. The existence of three constitutionally identical forms of hamigeran Q (8a-8c) requires the involvement of an allo-isoleucine stereoisomer and suggests the intriguing possibility of partial prokaryotic biogenesis of these unusual secondary metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo502370bDOI Listing
January 2015

A loose domain swapping organization confers a remarkable stability to the dimeric structure of the arginine binding protein from Thermotoga maritima.

PLoS One 2014 15;9(5):e96560. Epub 2014 May 15.

Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, CNR, Napoli, Italy.

The arginine binding protein from Thermatoga maritima (TmArgBP), a substrate binding protein (SBP) involved in the ABC system of solute transport, presents a number of remarkable properties. These include an extraordinary stability to temperature and chemical denaturants and the tendency to form multimeric structures, an uncommon feature among SBPs involved in solute transport. Here we report a biophysical and structural characterization of the TmArgBP dimer. Our data indicate that the dimer of the protein is endowed with a remarkable stability since its full dissociation requires high temperature as well as SDS and urea at high concentrations. In order to elucidate the atomic level structural properties of this intriguing protein, we determined the crystallographic structures of the apo and the arginine-bound forms of TmArgBP using MAD and SAD methods, respectively. The comparison of the liganded and unliganded models demonstrates that TmArgBP tertiary structure undergoes a very large structural re-organization upon arginine binding. This transition follows the Venus Fly-trap mechanism, although the entity of the re-organization observed in TmArgBP is larger than that observed in homologous proteins. Intriguingly, TmArgBP dimerizes through the swapping of the C-terminal helix. This dimer is stabilized exclusively by the interactions established by the swapping helix. Therefore, the TmArgBP dimer combines a high level of stability and conformational freedom. The structure of the TmArgBP dimer represents an uncommon example of large tertiary structure variations amplified at quaternary structure level by domain swapping. Although the biological relevance of the dimer needs further assessments, molecular modelling suggests that the two TmArgBP subunits may simultaneously interact with two distinct ABC transporters. Moreover, the present protein structures provide some clues about the determinants of the extraordinary stability of the biomolecule. The availability of an accurate 3D model represents a powerful tool for the design of new TmArgBP suited for biotechnological applications.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0096560PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4022495PMC
January 2015

Multi-technique quantitative analysis and socioeconomic considerations of lead, cadmium, and arsenic in children's toys and toy jewelry.

Chemosphere 2014 Aug 18;108:205-13. Epub 2014 Feb 18.

Department of Chemistry, Gottwald Center for the Sciences, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173, United States. Electronic address:

A wide spectrum and large number of children's toys and toy jewelry items were purchased from both bargain and retail vendors and analyzed for arsenic, cadmium, and lead metal content using multiple analytical techniques, including flame and furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy as well as X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Particularly dangerous for young children, metal concentrations in toys/toy jewelry were assessed for compliance with current Consumer Safety Product Commission (CPSC) regulations (F963-11). A conservative metric involving multiple analytical techniques was used to categorize compliance: one technique confirmation of metal in excess of CPSC limits indicated a "suspect" item while confirmation on two different techniques warranted a non-compliant designation. Sample matrix-based standard addition provided additional confirmation of non-compliant and suspect products. Results suggest that origin of purchase, rather than cost, is a significant factor in the risk assessment of these materials with 57% of toys/toy jewelry items from bargain stores non-compliant or suspect compared to only 15% from retail outlets and 13% if only low cost items from the retail stores are compared. While jewelry was found to be the most problematic product (73% of non-compliant/suspect samples), lead (45%) and arsenic (76%) were the most dominant toxins found in non-compliant/suspect samples. Using the greater Richmond area as a model, the discrepancy between bargain and retail children's products, along with growing numbers of bargain stores in low-income and urban areas, exemplifies an emerging socioeconomic public health issue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.01.041DOI Listing
August 2014
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