Publications by authors named "J C Inman"

269 Publications

A Decade of Drinking: Temporal Trends in Apparent Household Beer Intake and Standard Drink Consumption in the United States.

Subst Use Misuse 2021 Jun 4:1-11. Epub 2021 Jun 4.

Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Beer remains the greatest source of per capita alcohol consumption in the United States, and increasing market availability and consumer demand for higher alcohol has meaningful public health consequences. To determine whether apparent alcohol intake from beer changed among households over time, we used nationally-representative US Nielsen Consumer Panel purchasing data from 2004 to 2014, and incorporated information on percent alcohol by volume (ABV) to compute the number of standard drinks of alcohol consumed from beer as a result. We queried external data sources (e.g. official manufacture, consumer beer-related websites) to obtain beer-specific ABVs, merged this information with Nielsen consumer-level data, and calculated the average rate of beer and standard drink consumption per household per year. We used joinpoint regression to estimate annual percentage changes and annual absolute changes in intake over time, with separate piecewise linear segments fit between years if a significant deviation in trend was detected. Higher alcohol content beer consumption increased steadily across the decade, accounting for 9.6% of total intake in 2004 compared to 21.6% of total intake by 2014. Standard drink intake from beer declined sharply post-2011 by 3.04% annually (95% CI: -5.93, -0.06) or by 4.52 standard drinks (95% CI: -8.69, -0.35) yearly - coinciding with several beer industry transitions, market share fluctuations, and consumer preference changes for beer occurring around that time. Despite consistent increases in higher alcohol content beer intake across the decade, households do not appear to be consuming more standard drinks of alcohol from beer as a result.Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1928208 .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1928208DOI Listing
June 2021

Contemporary experience with paravisceral aortic aneurysm (PVAAA) repair in a tertiary center.

Ann Vasc Surg 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Objectives: To describe contemporary outcomes from a single center capable of both complex open and endovascular aortic repair for paravisceral aortic aneurysms (PVAAA).

Methods: Data on all patients receiving open or endovascular (endo) treatment for aortic aneurysms with proximal extent at or above the renal arteries and distal to the inferior pulmonary ligament (IPL) were reviewed. Coarsened exact matching (CEM) on age, aneurysm type, gender, coronary artery disease (CAD), previous aortic surgery and symptomatic status created balanced cohorts for outcomes comparisons.

Results: Between October, 2006 and February, 2018, 194 patients were treated for juxtarenal (40%), pararenal (21%), paravisceral (6%) and Type 4 thoracoabdominal (34%) aortic aneurysms with open (81, 42%) or endo (113, 58%) at a single tertiary center. Endo repairs included renal coverage with a bifurcated graft (2%), unilateral (13%) or bilateral (4%) renal snorkels, Z-fen (15%), multi-branched graft (IDE protocol; 62%) and unique complex configurations (4%). On multivariable analysis, patients selected for open surgery were more likely to be symptomatic, whereas older patients, female patients and those with Type 4 TAAA extent were more often selected for endovascular treatment. Matching based on the significant independent covariates reduced the open and endovascular groups by one-third. Survival at 30 days was 97% for endo and 94% for open repair, 98% for both subgroups when excluding symptomatic cases, and was not different between the matched groups (98% vs 89%; P=0.23). Hospital and ICU stays were longer in open patients (8 vs. 10 days, 2 vs. 4, both P≤0.001). Post-op CVA, MI, lower extremity ischemia, surgical site infections and reoperation were not different between matched groups (all p>0.05), while pulmonary and intestinal complications, as well as grade 1/2 renal dysfunction by RIFLE criteria, were more common after open repair (all P<0.05). Spinal cord ischemia was significantly more frequent in the unmatched Endo group (11% vs. 1%, P=0.02), but this difference was not significant after matching. Composite major aortic complications was no different between treatment groups (unmatched P=0.91, matched P=0.87). Endo treatment resulted in patients more frequently discharged to home (84% vs. 66%, P=0.02). Reintervention after 30 days occurred more frequently in the endo group (P=0.002). Estimated survivals at 1 and 5 years for endo and open are 96% vs. 81% and 69% vs. 81% respectively (Log-rank P=0.57).

Conclusions: Contemporary repair of PVAAA demonstrates safe outcomes with durable survival benefit when patients are well-selected for open or complex endovascular repair. We believe these data have implications for off-label device use in the treatment of PVAAA, and that open repair remains an essential option for younger, good risk patients in experienced centers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2021.01.109DOI Listing
April 2021

A systematic review into the effectiveness of occupational therapy for improving function and participation in activities of everyday life in adults with a diagnosis of depression.

J Affect Disord 2021 03 25;282:962-973. Epub 2020 Dec 25.

School of Health and Society, University of Salford, United Kingdom.

Background: Depression is a common mental health disorder, the symptoms of which can disrupt functioning and lead to reduced participation in everyday activities.  Occupational therapy is routinely provided for people with such difficulties; however, the evidence underpinning this intervention for depression has yet to be systematically assessed.

Method: A systematic review of the effectiveness of occupational therapy for people with a diagnosis of depression, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) was undertaken. Seven databases were searched using terms for depression combined with terms associated with occupational therapy. Due to heterogeneity in study design and outcome measures, a best evidence synthesis was undertaken as an alternative to meta-analysis.

Results: Of 1962 articles identified, 63 full texts were assessed and six met the inclusion criteria. Studies were carried out in Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. There was strong evidence for the effectiveness of occupational therapy return-to-work interventions for improving depression symptomology, limited evidence for occupational therapy lifestyle interventions for reducing anxiety and suicidal ideation, and limited evidence for improving work participation.  No studies evaluated individualised client-centred occupational therapy, highlighting a gap in research.

Limitations: Incomplete reporting within studies and heterogeneity prevented meta-analysis.  English language restrictions were applied.

Conclusions: Whilst overall the evidence base for occupational therapy for depression is limited, strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of occupational therapy return-to-work interventions, which is important given the costs associated with mental ill-health and work absence. Further research is needed to strengthen the evidence base.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.12.080DOI Listing
March 2021

Fistula Management in Head and Neck Cancer.

Semin Plast Surg 2020 Nov 24;34(4):299-304. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery Associates, Fort Worth, Texas.

Fistulas in head and neck cancer patients are a common and challenging issue. Despite their commonality, there is little consensus regarding optimal treatment strategies or in preventative measures that might be taken preoperatively. A general knowledge and understanding of what factors correlate with fistula formation can assist a surgeon in optimizing a patient for surgery, thus decreasing prevalence. In addition, surgical techniques can aid in both the prevention and treatment of fistulas once they form. This review details risk factors for fistula formation, the use of vascularized tissue as a preventative measure, conservative and nonconservative treatment of fistulas, and possible strategies to decrease the likelihood of their formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1721825DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7759424PMC
November 2020

Consideration in Microvascular Reconstruction during Times of Social Crises: Perspectives on Resource Utilization.

Facial Plast Surg 2020 Dec 24;36(6):768-772. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Department of Otolaryngology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.

Reconstruction of head and neck surgical defects can be a complicated, costly process. While the era of cost-effective medicine has begun to broadly question the necessity of high-cost care, times of extraordinary sociomedical demand bring increased scrutiny to even routine costs and resource utilization. Within this context, we reviewed the advantages, drawbacks, and financial costs of both regional and free flap reconstructions, namely the decreased costs and hospital resource utilization that may be associated with reconstruction using regional flaps. Although beset by reports of partial necrosis in certain regional flaps-particularly the submental island, cervicofacial advancement, and supraclavicular artery island flaps-many reports have demonstrated complication and flap failure rates equivalent to those of free flaps. Additionally, regional flaps have been associated with decreased costs for hospital stay, most notably in cases of postoperative complications. In cases necessitating free flap reconstruction, cost-savings strategies such as bypassing postoperative intensive care unit admissions have been shown to provide satisfactory, safe outcomes. As the head and neck surgeon continues to adapt to the medical pressures of a global pandemic, resource-sparing approaches to oncologic care will persist in their newfound importance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1721811DOI Listing
December 2020