Publications by authors named "J B Share"

34 Publications

Patient Preferences Regarding Surgical Interventions for Knee Osteoarthritis.

Clin Med Insights Arthritis Musculoskelet Disord 2017 20;10:1179544117732039. Epub 2017 Sep 20.

OrthoEvidence Inc., Burlington, ON, Canada.

Surgical interventions for knee osteoarthritis (OA) have markedly different procedure attributes and may have dramatic differences in patient desirability. A total of 323 patients with knee OA were included in a dual response, choice-based conjoint analysis to identify the relative preference of 9 different procedure attributes. A model was also developed to simulate how patients might respond if presented with the real-world knee OA procedures, based on conservative assumptions regarding their attributes. The "amount of cutting and removal of the existing bone" required for a procedure had the highest preference score, indicating that these patients considered it the most important attribute. More specifically, a procedure that requires the least amount of bone cutting or removal would be expected to be the most preferred surgical alternative. The model also suggested that patients who are younger and report the highest pain levels and greatest functional limitations would be more likely to opt for surgical intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1179544117732039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613842PMC
September 2017

Topography of cerebral white-matter disease of prematurity studied prospectively in 1607 very-low-birthweight infants.

J Child Neurol 2001 Jun;16(6):401-8

Department of Pediatrics, New England Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

The objective of this study was to evaluate to what extent (1) the characteristics of localization, distribution, and size of echodense and echolucent abnormalities enable individuals to be designated as having either periventricular hemorrhagic infarction or periventricular leukomalacia and (2) the characteristics of periventricular hemorrhagic infarction and periventricular leukomalacia are independent occurrences. The population for this study consisted of 1607 infants with birthweights of 500 to 1500 g, born between January 1991 and December 1993, who had at least one cranial ultrasound scan read independently by at least two ultrasonographers. The ultrasound data collection form diagrammed six standard coronal views. The cerebrum was divided into 17 zones in each hemisphere. All abnormalities were described as being echodense or echolucent and were classified on the basis of their size, laterality, location, and evolution. Eight percent (134/1607) of infants had at least one white-matter abnormality. The prevalence of white-matter disease decreased with increasing gestational age. Most abnormalities were small or medium sized and unilateral; only large echodensities tended to be bilateral and asymmetric. Large abnormalities, whether echodense or echolucent, were more likely than smaller abnormalities to be widespread, and the extent of cerebral involvement was independent of whether abnormalities were unilateral or bilateral. Large abnormalities were relatively more likely than small abnormalities to involve anterior planes. Small abnormalities, whether echodense or echolucent, or whether unilateral or bilateral, preferentially occurred near the trigone. Using the characteristics of location, size, and laterality/symmetry, we were able to allocate only 53% of infants with white-matter abnormalities to periventricular hemorrhagic infarction or periventricular leukomalacia. Assuming that periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular hemorrhagic infarction are independent and do not share risk factors, and that each occurs in approximately 5% of infants, we would have expected 0.25%, or about 4 individuals, to have abnormalities with characteristics of both periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular hemorrhagic infarction, whereas we found 63 such infants. Most infants with white-matter disease could not be clearly designated as having periventricular hemorrhagic infarction or periventricular leukomalacia only. Periventricular hemorrhagic infarction contributes to the risk of periventricular leukomalacia occurrence, or the two sorts of abnormalities share common risk antecedent factors. The descriptive term echodense or echolucent and the generic term white-matter disease of prematurity should be used instead of periventricular leukomalacia or periventricular hemorrhagic infarction when referring to sonographically defined white-matter abnormalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088307380101600603DOI Listing
June 2001

Early failure of Pavlik harness treatment for developmental hip dysplasia: clinical and ultrasound predictors.

J Pediatr Orthop 2001 May-Jun;21(3):348-53

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Houston, Houston, Texas 77030-3701, USA.

A cohort of 93 patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) treated with a Pavlik harness were evaluated to determine predictors of treatment failure. Failure was defined as failure to achieve or maintain hip reduction in the Pavlik harness. Of 93 patients (137 hips), 17 (26 hips) failed Pavlik harness treatment. Univariate risk factors for failure included bilaterality, initial clinical exam, and initial ultrasound (US) percent coverage. Clinical exam and initial percent coverage were multivariate risk factors for failure. Among initially clinically dislocatable hips, a low initial US alpha angle correlated with an increased likelihood of failure. All (6/6) patients with an initially irreducible hip and an initial coverage of <20% by US eventually failed treatment. Gender, side of pathology, and age at diagnosis and initiation of treatment did not correlate with failure. Irreducibility by physical exam combined with US coverage of <20% identified a patient group that uniformly failed Pavlik harness treatment. These patients may be candidates for alternative bracing, traction, or closed or open reduction.
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August 2001

Small intestinal obstruction by remnants of the omphalomesenteric duct: findings on contrast enema.

Pediatr Radiol 2000 Mar;30(3):165-7

The Children's Hospital, Department of Radiology, Denver, CO 80218, USA.

Objective: We reviewed the contrast enema examinations and medical records of six patients with small intestinal obstruction due to omphalomesenteric duct remnant to evaluate for characteristic imaging findings.

Results: In five out of the six patients the point of obstruction was demonstrated on the enema; in three patients, the characteristic "beak" of a volvulus was seen, either in the terminal ileum or cecum. In three patients, there was medial deviation of the cecum.

Conclusion: The characteristic radiographic features of volvulus at the cecum or terminal ileum and medial deviation of the cecum should suggest persistence of an omphalomesenteric duct remnant as the etiology of obstruction in a child less than 2 years of age. The appearance of omphalomesenteric duct remnant obstruction on enema examination, though not specific, is characteristic and should be familiar to pediatric radiologists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002470050037DOI Listing
March 2000

Variability of diuresis renography interpretation due to method of post-diuretic renal pelvic clearance half-time determination.

J Urol 2000 Aug;164(2):467-71

Departments of Radiology (Divisions of Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasonography), Biostatistics and Urology, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Purpose: We assessed variability in the interpretation of diuresis renography that may result from using different methods of clearance half-time determination.

Materials And Methods: We reviewed 152 diuresis renography studies performed at diagnosis or during followup of 53 children enrolled in a prospective study assessing the natural history of unilateral neonatal hydronephrosis. Studies were classified as nonobstructive, indeterminate or obstructive using 4 methods of half-time determination. Intermethod correlation and agreement were evaluated. We compared the proportion of nonobstructive, indeterminate and obstructive classifications by each method, and the interpretation of individual studies based on each method.

Results: Among methods we noted a high degree of correlation and fair to excellent agreement (Spearman rho = 0.86 to 0.92 and kappa = 0.57 to 0.86, respectively). However, in 27.8% of intermethod comparisons the proportion of studies classified as nonobstructive, indeterminate and obstructive differed significantly (p <0.05). The classification of pelvicaliceal drainage varied by method for all but the most severely dilated systems. In individual studies classification by 1 method was discordant with classification by another in 19% of comparisons. Of the discordant interpretations 97.7% involved nonobstructive versus indeterminate or indeterminate versus obstructive classifications.

Conclusions: Variability in classifying drainage patterns based on half-time requires that practitioners be circumspect when applying this parameter for managing asymptomatic hydronephrosis. It also necessitates the description of quantitative methodology in published series of this important clinical problem.
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August 2000
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