Publications by authors named "J Aaron Hipp"

344 Publications

Insight into Selecting Adolescents for Drinking Intervention Programs: a Simulation Based on Stochastic Actor-Oriented Models.

Prev Sci 2021 Jun 12. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Program in Public Health, Department of Health, Society, and Behavior Administration, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, 92697, USA.

Adolescent drinking remains a prominent public health and socioeconomic issue in the USA with costly consequences. While numerous drinking intervention programs have been developed, there is little guidance whether certain strategies of participant recruitment are more effective than others. The current study aims at addressing this gap in the literature using a computer simulation approach, a more cost-effective method than employing actual interventions. We first estimate stochastic actor-oriented models for two schools from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). We then employ different strategies for selecting adolescents for the intervention (either based on their drinking levels or their positions in the school network) and simulate the estimated model forward in time to assess the aggregated level of drinking in the school at a later time point. The results suggest that selecting moderate or heavy drinkers for the intervention produces better results compared to selecting casual or light drinkers. The intervention results are improved further if network position information is taken into account, as selecting drinking adolescents with higher in-degree or higher eigenvector centrality values for intervention yields the best results. Results from this study help elucidate participant selection criteria and targeted network intervention strategies for drinking intervention programs in the USA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-021-01261-4DOI Listing
June 2021

Suitability of Placental Blood Samples of Newborns for Pre-Transfusion Testing.

Front Pediatr 2021 30;9:661321. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Pathology, University of Florida College of Medicine Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL, United States.

To show concordance between heel stick and placental blood sample pairs for newborns' pre-transfusion testing and to validate placental blood's tube and gel methodology. Placental samples were collected for pre-transfusion testing at birth from 78 singleton and twin newborns admitted to our Mother-Baby Unit to compare with the results of heel stick samples taken from same newborns. Gestational age ≥35 weeks, weight ≥2,000 g. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Informed consent was obtained from newborn parents. ABO blood group, Rhesus factor (Rh), direct antiglobulin test (DAT), and antibody screen were performed. Ortho ProVue Analyzer was used for tube and gel methods. McNemar's test for paired categorical data was performed. One hundred percent concordance in 78 pairs for ABO and Rh. Seventy-four pairs were tested for antibodies, 72 were both negative, 1 was both positive, and 1 gave discordant result. Ninety-nine percent concordance, = 0.999. Sixty-five pairs were both DAT negative, seven were both DAT positive, and six gave discordant results. Ninety-two percent concordance, = 0.68. Placental blood gave identical results comparing tube with gel methods. Placental blood is suitable for pre-transfusion testing and can replace heel sticks. Placental blood tube and gel methods are validated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.661321DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8119626PMC
April 2021

Measuring Nature Contact: A Narrative Review.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 13;18(8). Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

While many studies suggest evidence for the health benefits of nature, there is currently no standardized method to measure time spent in nature or nature contact, nor agreement on how best to define nature contact in research. The purpose of this review is to summarize how nature contact has been measured in recent health research and provide insight into current metrics of exposure to nature at individual and population scales. The most common methods include surrounding greenness, questionnaires, and global positioning systems (GPS) tracking. Several national-level surveys exist, though these are limited by their cross-sectional design, often measuring only a single component of time spent in nature, and poor links to measures of health. In future research, exposure assessment combining the quantifying (e.g., time spent in nature and frequency of visits to nature) and qualifying (e.g., greenness by the normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and ratings on perception by individuals) aspects of current methods and leveraging innovative methods (e.g., experience sampling methods, ecological momentary assessment) will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the health effects of nature exposure and inform health policy and urban planning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084092DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069863PMC
April 2021

Cross-oncopanel study reveals high sensitivity and accuracy with overall analytical performance depending on genomic regions.

Genome Biol 2021 Apr 16;22(1):109. Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Greenwood Genetic Center, 106 Gregor Mendel Circle, Greenwood, SC, 29646, USA.

Background: Targeted sequencing using oncopanels requires comprehensive assessments of accuracy and detection sensitivity to ensure analytical validity. By employing reference materials characterized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-led SEquence Quality Control project phase2 (SEQC2) effort, we perform a cross-platform multi-lab evaluation of eight Pan-Cancer panels to assess best practices for oncopanel sequencing.

Results: All panels demonstrate high sensitivity across targeted high-confidence coding regions and variant types for the variants previously verified to have variant allele frequency (VAF) in the 5-20% range. Sensitivity is reduced by utilizing VAF thresholds due to inherent variability in VAF measurements. Enforcing a VAF threshold for reporting has a positive impact on reducing false positive calls. Importantly, the false positive rate is found to be significantly higher outside the high-confidence coding regions, resulting in lower reproducibility. Thus, region restriction and VAF thresholds lead to low relative technical variability in estimating promising biomarkers and tumor mutational burden.

Conclusion: This comprehensive study provides actionable guidelines for oncopanel sequencing and clear evidence that supports a simplified approach to assess the analytical performance of oncopanels. It will facilitate the rapid implementation, validation, and quality control of oncopanels in clinical use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-021-02315-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8051090PMC
April 2021