Publications by authors named "J A Siles"

69 Publications

Influence of packing material on the biofiltration of butyric acid: A comparative study from a physico-chemical, olfactometric and microbiological perspective.

J Environ Manage 2021 Sep 12;294:113044. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Area of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Córdoba, Campus Universitario de Rabanales, Carretera N-IV, Km 396, Edificio Marie Curie, 14071, Córdoba, Spain. Electronic address:

The influence of bed material on the odor removal performance of a biofilter was studied. A compost-wood biofilter and a wood biofilter were treated with a gaseous stream contaminated with butyric acid and comparatively evaluated at pilot scale using olfactometric, physico-chemical and microbiological approaches. The variables analyzed in both biofilters were correlated with specific families of their microbiota composition. In addition to a higher nutrients content (nitrogen and phosphorus), the compost-wood biofilter registered maximum values in number of aerobic microorganisms (3.6·10 CFU/g) and in aerobic microbiological activity (≈40 mg O/g VS of cumulative oxygen demand at 20 h). This may explain the higher performance of this biofilter compared to the wood biofilter, withstanding odor loads of up to 1450 ou/m·s with odor removal efficiencies close to 100%. The analysis of the microbial community showed that Actinobacteria, particularly the mostly aerobic Microbacteriaceae family, might play an important role in butyric acid degradation and hence reduce odor impact. The multidisciplinary analysis carried out in this work could be a very useful strategy for the optimal design of biofiltration operations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.113044DOI Listing
September 2021

Studying Microbial Communities through Co-Occurrence Network Analyses during Processes of Waste Treatment and in Organically Amended Soils: A Review.

Microorganisms 2021 May 28;9(6). Epub 2021 May 28.

Grupo de Ecoloxía Animal (GEA), Universidad de Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain.

Organic wastes have the potential to be used as soil organic amendments after undergoing a process of stabilization such as composting or as a resource of renewable energy by anaerobic digestion (AD). Both composting and AD are well-known, eco-friendly approaches to eliminate and recycle massive amounts of wastes. Likewise, the application of compost amendments and digestate (the by-product resulting from AD) has been proposed as an effective way of improving soil fertility. The study of microbial communities involved in these waste treatment processes, as well as in organically amended soils, is key in promoting waste resource efficiency and deciphering the features that characterize microbial communities under improved soil fertility conditions. To move beyond the classical analyses of metataxonomic data, the application of co-occurrence network approaches has shown to be useful to gain insights into the interactions among the members of a microbial community, to identify its keystone members and modelling the environmental factors that drive microbial network patterns. Here, we provide an overview of essential concepts for the interpretation and construction of co-occurrence networks and review the features of microbial co-occurrence networks during the processes of composting and AD and following the application of the respective end products (compost and digestate) into soil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061165DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8227910PMC
May 2021

The structure and function of soil archaea across biomes.

J Proteomics 2021 04 11;237:104147. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Murcia E-30100, Spain.

We lack a predictive understanding of the environmental drivers determining the structure and function of archaeal communities as well as the proteome associated with these important soil organisms. Here, we characterized the structure (by 16S rRNA gene sequencing) and function (by metaproteomics) of archaea from 32 soil samples across terrestrial ecosystems with contrasting climate and vegetation types. Our multi-"omics" approach unveiled that genes from Nitrosophaerales and Thermoplasmata dominated soils collected from four continents, and that archaea comprise 2.3 ± 0.3% of microbial proteins in these soils. Aridity positively correlated with the proportion of Nitrosophaerales genes and the number of archaeal proteins. The interaction of climate x vegetation shaped the functional profile of the archaeal community. Our study provides novel insights into the structure and function of soil archaea across climates, and highlights that these communities may be influenced by increasing global aridity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2021.104147DOI Listing
April 2021

Interactive impacts of boron and organic amendments in plant-soil microbial relationships.

J Hazard Mater 2021 04 28;408:124939. Epub 2020 Dec 28.

CEBAS-CSIC, Department of Soil and Water Conservation, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain.

Water shortage and low organic carbon content in soil limit soil fertility and crop productivity. The use of desalinated seawater is increasing as an alternative source of irrigation water. However, it has a high boron (B) content that could cause toxicity in the plant-soil microbial system. Here, we evaluated the responses of the soil microbiota and lemon trees to 3 irrigation B doses (0.3, 1, and 15 mg L) under two types of soil management (conventional, CS; and organic, OS) in a 180-days pot experiment. High B doses promoted B accumulation in soil, reaching harmful concentrations that affected soil biodiversity. Our results suggest a close interaction between B and organic labile fractions that increased B availability in soil solution. Besides, B addition to soil impacted on microbial biomass. The bacterial community showed sensitivity to the B dose. Organic amendment did not increase B soil adsorption but it favored B plant uptake. The highest B dose had a detrimental impact on plant physiology, finally resulting lethal for the plants. Our study provides a comprehensive assessment of the microbes-plant interactions in soils irrigated with water with high B content. This will be fundamental in the design of future fertirrigation strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.124939DOI Listing
April 2021
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