Publications by authors named "J A Grotenhuis"

117 Publications

Prediction Models in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Forecasting Clinical Outcome With Artificial Intelligence.

Neurosurgery 2021 Apr;88(5):E427-E434

Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Background: Predicting outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is known to be challenging and complex. Machine learning approaches, of which feedforward artificial neural networks (ffANNs) are the most widely used, could contribute to the patient-specific outcome prediction.

Objective: To investigate the prediction capacity of an ffANN for the patient-specific clinical outcome and the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and compare those results with the predictions of 2 internationally used scoring systems.

Methods: A prospective database was used to predict (1) death during hospitalization (ie, mortality) (n = 451), (2) unfavorable modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 mo (n = 413), and (3) the occurrence of DCI (n = 362). Additionally, the predictive capacities of the ffANN were compared to those of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) and VASOGRADE to predict clinical outcome and occurrence of DCI.

Results: The area under the curve (AUC) of the ffANN showed to be 88%, 85%, and 72% for predicting mortality, an unfavorable mRS, and the occurrence of DCI, respectively. Sensitivity/specificity rates of the ffANN for mortality, unfavorable mRS, and the occurrence of DCI were 82%/80%, 94%/80%, and 74%/68%. The ffANN and SAHIT calculator showed similar AUCs for predicting personalized outcome. The presented ffANN and VASOGRADE were found to perform equally with regard to personalized prediction of occurrence of DCI.

Conclusion: The presented ffANN showed equal performance when compared with VASOGRADE and SAHIT scoring systems while using less individual cases. The web interface launched simultaneously with the publication of this manuscript allows for usage of the ffANN-based prediction tool for individual data (https://nutshell-tool.com/).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyaa581DOI Listing
April 2021

Predatory journals: temporary inconvenience or permanent disruption?

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 Jan 12. Epub 2021 Jan 12.

Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-020-04685-zDOI Listing
January 2021

Predatory publishing and journals: it's ubiquitous!

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 01 12;163(1):11-12. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-020-04645-7DOI Listing
January 2021

Avoiding predatory publishing for early career neurosurgeons: what should you know before you submit?

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 01 26;163(1):1-8. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: Scientific research can offer the joy of discovery. For many graduating neurosurgeons, often, a seminar, class, or instructional module is their first and only formal exposure to the world of conducting research responsibly, to write down and report the results of such research. The pressure to publish scientific research is high, but any young neurosurgeon who is unaware of how predatory publishers operate can get duped by it and can lose their valuable and hard-fought research. Hence, we have attempted to provide an overview of all potentially predatory neurosurgery publications and provide some "red flags" to recognize them.

Methods: A suspected list of predatory publications was collected via a thorough review of the Neurosurgery journals listed in 4 major so-called blacklists, i.e., Beall's list, Manca's list, Cabell's blacklist, and Strinzel blacklist and then cross-referenced with UGC CARE whitelist to remove any potential legitimate journals. All journals with a scope of the Neurosurgery publication were searched using terms in the search bar: "Neurosurgery", "Neuroanatomy", "Neuropathology", and "Neurological disorder/disease". Since all predatory journals claim to be open access, all possible types of open access journals on Scimago were also searched, and thus a comparison was possible in terms of publication cost and number of legitimate open access journals when compared with predatory ones. In addition, methodologies by which these journals penetrate legitimate indexes like PubMed was investigated.

Results: A total of 46 predatory journals were found and were enlisted along with their publishers and web addresses. Sixty of the 360 Neurosurgery journals listed on Scimago were open access and the fee for the predatory journals was substantially lower (< $150) when compared with legitimate journals ($900-$3000). Six types of open access types exist while a total of 26 red flags in 7 stages of publication can be found in predatory journals. These journals have penetrated indexes by having similar names to legitimate journals and by publishing articles with external funding which mandate their indexing.

Conclusion: These 46 journals were defined as predatory by 4 major blacklists, and none of them was found in the UGC Care white list. They also fulfill the 26 red-flags that define a predatory journal. The blacklist detailed here may become redundant; hence "whenever in doubt" regarding a journal with "red-flags", the authors are advised to refer to whitelists to be on the safer side. Publishing in predatory journals leads to not only loss of valuable research but also discredits a researcher among his peers and can be hindrance in career progression. Some journals are even indexed on PubMed, and they have sophisticated webpages and high-quality online presentations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-020-04546-9DOI Listing
January 2021

Genetic analysis of spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord: a case series.

BMC Neurol 2020 Apr 6;20(1):121. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Background: Spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord is better known as herniated spinal cord. There are many arguments in favour of considering it a developmental defect. From this point of view, it is a type of neural tube disorder. Neural tube disorders can be caused by multiple factors, including a genetic factor. A common genetic defect in patients with a spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth of the spinal cord is sought for.

Case Presentation: In two patients with a symptomatic lesion and referred to an academic hospital a genetic analysis was performed after informed consent. Whole-exome analysis was performed. : Whole-exome analysis did not result in identification of a clinically relevant genetic variant.

Conclusions: This the first study to investigate the genetic contribution to spinal dysraphism with a hamartomatous growth (appendix) of the spinal cord. We could not establish a genetic cause for this entity. This conclusion cannot be definitive due to the small sample size. However, the incidental occurrence, the lack of reports of inheritance of this disorder and the absence of contribution to syndromal disorders favours a defect of normal development of the spinal cord.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12883-020-01710-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7132931PMC
April 2020