Publications by authors named "Izabel Costa Silva Neta"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein-Client Protein Interactions.

Plants (Basel) 2020 Jun 29;9(7). Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Horticulture, University of Kentucky Seed Biology Program, Plant Science Building, 1405 Veterans Drive, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0312, USA.

The intrinsically disordered proteins belonging to the LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT protein (LEAP) family have been ascribed a protective function over an array of intracellular components. We focus on how LEAPs may protect a stress-susceptible proteome. These examples include instances of LEAPs providing a shield molecule function, possibly by instigating liquid-liquid phase separations. Some LEAPs bind directly to their client proteins, exerting a holdase-type chaperonin function. Finally, instances of LEAP-client protein interactions have been documented, where the LEAP modulates (interferes with) the function of the client protein, acting as a surreptitious rheostat of cellular homeostasis. From the examples identified to date, it is apparent that client protein modulation also serves to mitigate stress. While some LEAPs can physically bind and protect client proteins, some apparently bind to assist the degradation of the client proteins with which they associate. Documented instances of LEAP-client protein binding, even in the absence of stress, brings to the fore the necessity of identifying how the LEAPs are degraded post-stress to render them innocuous, a first step in understanding how the cell regulates their abundance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/plants9070814DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7412488PMC
June 2020

Gene expression and genetic control to cold tolerance during maize seed germination.

BMC Plant Biol 2020 Apr 29;20(1):188. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Agriculture, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Background: The study of cold tolerance in maize seeds and seedlings through physiological quality assessments, as well as the genetic control associated with this trait, allows an early characterization of genotypes. Here we studied the genetic control for cold tolerance during the germination process in maize seeds and genes influenced by this stress.

Results: Six maize lines were used, three classified as tolerant and three as susceptible to low germination temperature. A field was developed to produce the hybrid seeds, in a partial diallel scheme including the reciprocal crosses. For the expression analysis, seeds from two contrasting lines were used, as well as their hybrid combination and their reciprocal crosses, on dried and moistened seeds at 10 °C for 4 and 7 days. It was evaluated the catalase (CAT) and esterase (EST) enzymes, heat-resistant proteins and the genes Putative stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD), Ascorbate Peroxidase (APX), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (ZmMPK5). The estimated values ​​for heterosis, general and specific combining abilities and reciprocal maternal and non-maternal effects were carried out and it showed that there is heterosis for germination at low temperatures, also the non-additive genes were more important and there was a reciprocal effect.

Conclusions: There is a greater expression of the CAT and EST enzymes in moistened seeds at seven days and there is less expression of heat-resistant proteins and the SAD gene at seven days of moistening. Also, there are variations in the expression of the APX, SOD and ZmMPK5 genes in dried and moistened seeds, as well as among the genotypes studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-020-02387-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191758PMC
April 2020