Publications by authors named "Iveta Nagyova"

80 Publications

European Public Health News.

Eur J Public Health 2021 Apr;31(2):449-453

EPH Conference Office; Chair 14th EPH Conference 2021.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckab022DOI Listing
April 2021

Posttraumatic growth after earthquake: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Soc Psychiatry 2021 Feb 22:20764021995856. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Research Center for Noncommunicable Diseases, Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Background: Posttraumatic growth (PTG) represents a positive personal change adverse events, such as natural disasters, including earthquake. However, the association between exposure to earthquake and level of PTG is still unknown. Thus, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analyses (MA) is to assess the level of PTG in people exposed to earthquake.

Methods: Studies were identified via Scopus, PsycInfo, Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, ProQuest, Cochran Library, Ovid, Google Scholar, OpenGrey, congress, and conferences research papers. The level of PTG was presented as mean and standard deviation. Subgroup analyses were conducted to control for the amount of time that had passed since stressor onset and age of the study population. The meta-regression was used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity, including sample size and age.

Results: The MA of all 21 studies using no restrictions related to age and time of the PTG measurement since traumatic event showed low level of PTG (41.71; 95%CI = 34.26; 49.16, : 62.44%, : .000). Subgroup analyses controlled for the age demonstrated that level of PTG was higher in adults (49.47; 95% CI = 42.35; 56.58, : 0%,  = .466) when compared to children and adolescents (35.38; 95% CI = 23.65; 47.11, : 69.09%,  < .00). Moreover, the pooled weight mean of PTG measured 1 year and less than 1 year since the earthquake varied between medium (46.04; 95%CI = 34.45; 57.63, :51.2%, : .037) and high (59.03; 95%CI = 41.46; 76.41, : 0%, : .990) levels, respectively.

Conclusion: The results of our MA showed low level of PTG in earthquake survivors. However, the mean value of PTG in adults was higher when compared to children and adolescents. In addition, the mean PTG was found to decrease over time since traumatic events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0020764021995856DOI Listing
February 2021

European Public Health News.

Eur J Public Health 2021 Feb;31(1):235-237

Chair 14th EPH Conference Dublin 2021.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa257DOI Listing
February 2021

Time to move to open access.

Eur J Public Health 2021 Feb;31(1)

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, European Public Health Association, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7851891PMC
February 2021

European Public Health News.

Eur J Public Health 2020 12;30(6):1233-1236

Chair 14th EPH Conference Dublin 2021.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa210DOI Listing
December 2020

European Public Health News.

Eur J Public Health 2020 10;30(5):1031-1033

European Public Health Association, World Congress on Public Health 2020.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa177DOI Listing
October 2020

European Public Health News.

Eur J Public Health 2020 Aug;30(4):842-844

European Public Health Association World Congress on Public Health 2020.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa151DOI Listing
August 2020

Sexual functioning in patients with multiple sclerosis and its association with social support and self-esteem.

Psychol Health Med 2020 Jul 29:1-11. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia.

Sexual dysfunction is very commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, this problem often remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Furthermore, still very little is known about protective psychosocial factors that may help to improve sexual functioning in MS patients. Thus, we aimed to assess the associations between social support, self-esteem and sexual functioning in MS patients when controlled for clinical and sociodemographic variables. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and the Rosenberg Scale of Self-esteem (RSE) were used to assess the independent variables. Sexual functioning was assessed by the Incapacity Status Scale (ISS). We found a significant association between social support and sexual functioning (p 0.01). However, this association attenuated (p < 0.05) when self-esteem (p < 0.01) was added to the model. Furthermore, we found that sexual dysfunction in MS patients was associated with older age (p < 0.001). Self-esteem was associated with sexual functioning more strongly compared to social support and sexual functioning, even though both of these variables were associated with sexual functioning as well. Our findings support the biopsychosocial model of treatment of sexual dysfunction in MS patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2020.1800054DOI Listing
July 2020

Effects of Nordic walking on cardiovascular performance and quality of life in coronary artery disease.

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2020 Oct 23;56(5):616-624. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Center, Vysne Ruzbachy, Slovakia.

Background: Cardiometabolic effects of physical exercise depend on its intensity, duration, and type. Conventional cardiovascular rehabilitation (CCVR) programs have significant advantages, but non-conventional activities such as Nordic walking (NW) may offer additional health benefits.

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of NW on cardiovascular performance and quality of life in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to a CCVR program.

Design: This was a pseudo-randomized, prospective, single-blinded, parallel-group trial.

Setting: The study was conducted at a resort/spa type facility located in a mountainous natural environment, 650 meters above sea level.

Population: Eighty-three CAD patients were allocated to either a Nordic walking or a control group.

Methods: The NW group (N.=53; age 59.1±7.0 years) underwent a three-week outdoor exercise program consisting of 40 minutes of walking four-times per week, whereas the controls performed traditional walking instead of NW. A patient's prescribed exercise intensity was according to exertion tolerance within 50-70% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2max); rating of perceived exertion 'mild/moderate' (12 to 14 points) on the 0-20 Borg Scale. Primary endpoint: cardiovascular and functional performance (exercise ergometry [EE], metabolic equivalent of tasks [METs], ejection fraction [EF], Six-Minute Walking Test [6MWT]). Secondary endpoint was quality of life (Short-Form 36 Health Survey). Statistical analysis was performed by generalized estimating equations with Cohen's d effect size (ES).

Results: NW led to higher cardiovascular performance compared to CCVR (ΔEE: +11.0% vs. +3.2%, small ES; ΔMETs: +9.8% vs. +1.5%, medium ES) and better functional performance (Δ6MWT: +8.3% vs. +5.1%, small ES). No significant differences were detected in EF (P=0.240) and SF-36 (PCS, P=0.425; MCS, P=0.400).

Conclusions: A three-week NW training program had clinically important effects, above and beyond CCVR, on cardiovascular and functional performance in CAD patients.

Clinical Rehabilitation Impact: Nordic walking is an accessible, safe, and effective low-threshold cardiac rehabilitation exercise training modality that seems to be particularly well-suited for people with limited functional and motivational capacities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S1973-9087.20.06120-1DOI Listing
October 2020

Health research and knowledge translation for achieving the sustainable development goals: tackling the hurdles.

Eur J Public Health 2020 03;30(Suppl_1):i36-i40

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia.

We are far from reaching the sustainable development goals (SDGs) for health despite a wealth of novel insights in disease mechanisms and possible solutions. Why have we failed in knowledge translation and implementation? Starting from the case of cardiovascular diseases as one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases, we examine barriers and hurdles, and perspectives for future health research. Health has multiple links with other SDGs. To accelerate the progress towards a healthy society, health research needs to take a broader view and become more cross-disciplinary and cross-sectoral. As one example, behavioural studies will underpin better prevention and treatment adherence. The next generation workforce in health and research needs an adapted education and training to implement more effective health approaches. As well, only effective dialogue and communication between researchers, practitioners, society and policymakers can lead to translation of evidence into policies, addressing the complexity of socioeconomic factors and commercial interests. Within Europe, health research needs a comprehensive vision and strategy that connects to achieving better health, as one of the interconnected SDGs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213555PMC
March 2020

Achieving the SDGs in the European Region.

Eur J Public Health 2020 03;30(Suppl_1):i1-i2

European Public Health Association (EUPHA), Utrecht, Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213553PMC
March 2020

Achieving the SDGs in the European Region.

Eur J Public Health 2020 03;30(Suppl_1):i1-i2

European Public Health Association (EUPHA), Utrecht, Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213553PMC
March 2020

Effect of an exercise programme for reducing abdominal fat on overactive bladder symptoms in young overweight women.

Int Urogynecol J 2020 05 26;31(5):895-902. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovak Republic.

Introduction And Hypothesis: The effect of exercise in relation to overweight and overactive bladder (OAB) in young women has not been sufficiently supported by studies. The objective of our study was to reduce symptoms of OAB through a 3-month exercise programme in young overweight women with OAB. The sample consisted of 70 women (mean age 26.7 ± 4.8 years), 36 being treated and 34 in the control group.

Methods: We used a body composition analyser with the assessment of skeletal muscle mass (SMM) (kg), body fat mass (BFM) (kg), body fat percentage (BFP) (%), visceral fat area (VFA) (cm²/level) and the waist/hip circumference index (WHR). OAB symptoms were evaluated using a voiding diary, the overactive bladder questionnaire (OAB-q) and the Patient Perception of Intensity of Urgency Scale (PPIUS). The intervention was a programme for the reduction of abdominal fat (PRAF), with elements of aerobic training, strengthening of the abdominal muscles and stretching.

Results: In the OAB symptoms assessed through the voiding diary (number of voidings per 24 h, nocturia, mean voided volume) as well as in the OAB-q and PPIUS scales after training, significant differences were reported in favour of the treatment group [number of voidings per 24 h: treatment vs. control group, baseline 9.1 ± 0.3 vs. 8.6 ± 0.3, final 6.9 ± 0.2 vs. 8.1 ± 0.2, p < 0.0001; mean voided volume per 24 h (ml): treatment vs. control group, baseline 154.2 ± 9.1 vs. 162.2 ± 9.3, final 201.3 ± 9.3 vs. 164.1 ± 9.6, p < 0.0001] with a large effect size (ES). In the body composition analysis after training, significant differences were also reported in favour of the treatment group in the reduction of body mass index (BMI), BFP and VFA (p < 0.0001), with a large ES.

Conclusions: Body composition analysis confirmed a reduction of BMI, body weight, body fat percentage, visceral abdominal fat, the WHR index and waist circumference in favour of the treatment group after the 12-week PRAF exercise programme. A reduction in OAB symptoms was also objectively confirmed following the PRAF exercise programme.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-019-04157-8DOI Listing
May 2020

Quality of life of obstructive sleep apnoea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Heart Lung 2020 Jan - Feb;49(1):10-24. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Department of Health Sciences, Community & Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Background: Previous studies have shown conflicting results on the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on quality of life (QoL) in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients.

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of CPAP on QoL in OSA patients compared to sham CPAP, placebo pills, and conservative treatment.

Methods: Studies were identified via Web of Knowledge, PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, EMBASE, OpenGrey, and the Cochrane Library. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the findings.

Results: Meta-analysis of 13 randomised controlled trials showed no significant differences in overall and psychological QoL comparing values of CPAP treated patients with controls; however, physical QoL improved. CPAP significantly affected the overall QoL in studies with controls receiving sham CPAP, parallel design, low risk of bias, and mild OSA patients.

Conclusion: CPAP treatment may help to improve physical symptoms of OSA, whereas impaired psychological QoL still cannot be alleviated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2019.10.004DOI Listing
November 2020

Psychological distress in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: The role of hostility and coping self-efficacy.

J Health Psychol 2020 Nov-Dec;25(13-14):2244-2259. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Department of Health Sciences, Community & Occupational Medicine, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

We aimed to assess whether hostility and coping self-efficacy are associated with psychological distress in obstructive sleep apnoea patients. Furthermore, we examined whether coping self-efficacy mediates the association between hostility and psychological distress. We included 150 obstructive sleep apnoea patients (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index ⩾5; 68% male; mean age: 48.9 ± 9.5 years). Regression models showed that hostility and poor coping self-efficacy were strongly associated with psychological distress in obstructive sleep apnoea patients. All assessed coping self-efficacy dimensions mediated the association between hostility and psychological distress. Coping self-efficacy for stopping unpleasant emotions and thoughts showed the strongest association with a lower level of psychological distress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105318792080DOI Listing
April 2021

Social support, mastery, sleep-related problems and their association with functional status in untreated obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

Heart Lung 2018 Jul - Aug;47(4):371-379. Epub 2018 May 31.

University of Groningen Department, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community & Occupational Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Social support and mastery are important aspects in the treatment of chronic diseases, however their role in connection with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) remains unclear.

Objectives: The study examined the associations between social support, mastery, sleep-related problems and functional status in untreated OSA patients.

Methods: All patients in this cross-sectional study completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Pearlin Mastery Scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. Multiple linear regression and mediation analyses were used to analyse the data.

Results: Participants were 150 newly diagnosed OSA patients (Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index-AHI≥5; 68% male; mean age 48.9 ± 9.5years). Compared with social support, mastery was more strongly associated with functional status. The indirect effects of sleep-related problems on functional status via mastery varied between 17.7% and 23.3%.

Conclusions: Supporting OSA patients' sense of mastery may significantly contribute to better disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2018.04.006DOI Listing
February 2019

Are disease severity, sleep-related problems, and anxiety associated with work functioning in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea?

Disabil Rehabil 2019 09 17;41(18):2164-2174. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

c University of Groningen Department, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Health Sciences , Community & Occupational Medicine , Groningen , the Netherlands.

To examine whether Obstructive Sleep Apnoea severity, sleep-related problems, and anxiety are associated with work functioning in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients, when controlled for age, gender and type of occupation. To investigate whether anxiety moderates the associations between sleep-related problems and work functioning. We included 105 Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients (70% male; mean age 46.62 ± 9.79 years). All patients completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire-2.0. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-severity, poor nighttime sleep quality, and anxiety were univariately associated with impaired work functioning. Multivariate analyzes revealed that poor perceived sleep quality was more strongly associated with work functioning than sleep efficiency and daily disturbances. Anxiety was strongly associated with impaired work functioning. After adding anxiety, the explained variance in work functioning increased from 20% to 25%. Anxiety moderated the association between low and medium levels of nighttime sleep quality problems and work functioning. Poor perceived sleep quality and anxiety were strongly associated with impaired work functioning in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients. These findings may help to optimize management, standard treatment, and work functioning in people with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea when confirmed in longitudinal studies. Implications for Rehabilitation Studies show an impairment of functional status, including work functioning, in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Aside from physical disorders, obstructive sleep apnea patients often experience mental problems, such as anxiety. As many people with obstructive sleep apnea are undiagnosed, our results demonstrate to employers and healthcare professionals the need to encourage patients for obstructive sleep apnea screening, especially in the situation of impaired work functioning, increased anxiety, and poor sleep quality. The associations between obstructive sleep apnea, sleep and anxiety might the awareness of health professionals towards diagnostic accuracy and standard treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2018.1460626DOI Listing
September 2019

Are disease severity, sleep-related problems, and anxiety associated with work functioning in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea?

Disabil Rehabil 2019 09 17;41(18):2164-2174. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

c University of Groningen Department, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Health Sciences , Community & Occupational Medicine , Groningen , the Netherlands.

To examine whether Obstructive Sleep Apnoea severity, sleep-related problems, and anxiety are associated with work functioning in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients, when controlled for age, gender and type of occupation. To investigate whether anxiety moderates the associations between sleep-related problems and work functioning. We included 105 Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients (70% male; mean age 46.62 ± 9.79 years). All patients completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Work Role Functioning Questionnaire-2.0. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-severity, poor nighttime sleep quality, and anxiety were univariately associated with impaired work functioning. Multivariate analyzes revealed that poor perceived sleep quality was more strongly associated with work functioning than sleep efficiency and daily disturbances. Anxiety was strongly associated with impaired work functioning. After adding anxiety, the explained variance in work functioning increased from 20% to 25%. Anxiety moderated the association between low and medium levels of nighttime sleep quality problems and work functioning. Poor perceived sleep quality and anxiety were strongly associated with impaired work functioning in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients. These findings may help to optimize management, standard treatment, and work functioning in people with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea when confirmed in longitudinal studies. Implications for Rehabilitation Studies show an impairment of functional status, including work functioning, in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Aside from physical disorders, obstructive sleep apnea patients often experience mental problems, such as anxiety. As many people with obstructive sleep apnea are undiagnosed, our results demonstrate to employers and healthcare professionals the need to encourage patients for obstructive sleep apnea screening, especially in the situation of impaired work functioning, increased anxiety, and poor sleep quality. The associations between obstructive sleep apnea, sleep and anxiety might the awareness of health professionals towards diagnostic accuracy and standard treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2018.1460626DOI Listing
September 2019

Management of multiple sclerosis: the role of coping self-efficacy and self-esteem.

Psychol Health Med 2018 09 7;23(8):964-969. Epub 2018 Feb 7.

b Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology , PJ Safarik University , Kosice , Slovakia.

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) engage in various coping behaviours in order to manage their disease. The aim of this study is to find out if the self-esteem of patients is associated with coping strategies - problem-focused (e.g. making a plan of action when confronted with a problem); emotion focused (e.g. get emotional support from community); and focused on stopping unpleasant emotions and thoughts (e.g. keeping oneself from feeling sad), and if it can enhance or hinder coping efforts in the disease management. We collected data from 155 consecutive MS patients who completed the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSE). Explained variance for problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping, and coping focused on stopping unpleasant emotions and thoughts was 33, 24, and 31%, respectively. Self-esteem seems to be associated with coping strategies indicating that feelings of self-worth are linked with the ability to handle difficult life situations and can be helpful in chronic disease management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2018.1437277DOI Listing
September 2018

The transfer of skills from cognitive and physical training to activities of daily living: a randomised controlled study.

Eur J Ageing 2017 Jun 3;14(2):133-142. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovak Republic.

Ageing is associated with the deterioration of all cognitive functions, including attention, memory and psychomotor speed. It has not yet been clearly confirmed whether the effects of cognitive and physical interventions can improve activities of daily living (ADL). This study compared the effectiveness of cognitive and physical training on cognitive functions and the transfer to ADL. Eighty older people with mild cognitive impairment (mean age 67.07 ± 4.3 years) were randomly divided into an experimental group ( = 40) and a control group ( = 40). Data were collected in an outpatient psychiatric clinic in a randomised controlled trial. Primary outcome measures included the following: cognitive functions were evaluated using the mini mental state examination, the AVLT-Auditory verbal learning test, the Stroop test, the TMT-trail making test, the DRT-disjunctive reaction time and the NHPT-nine hole peg test. Secondary outcome measure was the Bristol activities of daily living scale. The experimental group underwent a CogniPlus and physical training; consisting of 20 training sessions over 10 weeks. Both groups went through 30 min of daily physical training for 10 weeks. After the training, significant differences in favour of the experimental group were found in almost all the tests. In memory (AVLT) (p ≤ 0.0001, effect size (ES)  = 0.218. In reduction of the response time on attention tasks (Stroop tasks) ( ≤ 0.006, ES = 0.092-0.115). In lower error rates in all tests: Stroop tasks, DRT, TMT, NHPT ( ≤ 0.02-0.001, ES = 0.062-0.176). In ADL ( ≤ 0.0001, ES = 0.176). The combined cognitive and physical training had better efficacy for most cognitive functions and for ADL when compared with the physical training only.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10433-016-0395-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5550658PMC
June 2017

Associations between self-rated health, mental health problems and physical inactivity among urban adolescents.

Eur J Public Health 2017 12;27(6):984-989

Department of Social and Behavioural Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, PJ Safarik University, Kosice, Slovak Republic.

Background: Self-rated health is a valid and reliable subjective indicator of general health. We aimed to assess the associations between self-rated health, mental health problems, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and BMI among Slovak urban adolescents.

Methods: Data were collected within the EU-FP7: EURO-URHIS 2 (The European Health Indicator System Part 2) project in two largest Slovak cities: Bratislava and Kosice. Sample included 1111 adolescents (response rate 73.7%, mean age 14.32 ± 0.48 years, 52.8% boys). Self-rated health was measured with the first item from the Short Form Health Survey 36 questionnaire, mental health problems were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and for physical activity and sedentary behaviour questions from the WHO HBSC questionnaire were used. Logistic regression was performed to determine the associations between self-rated health and the independent variables.

Results: Self-rated health was found to be significantly associated with mental health problems, sedentary behaviour and BMI. However, the strongest association was found with engagement in physical activity every day (OR 8.0; 95% CI 1.6-39.9).

Conclusions: Previous research revealed that self-rated health was associated with various mental health problems. Our findings add to these results by showing that physical activity and sedentary behaviour are also very important additional factors related to self-rated health. Better understanding of these associations can help in developing more effective public health intervention programmes for adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckx051DOI Listing
December 2017

Do coping strategies mediate the association between Type D personality and quality of life among people with multiple sclerosis?

J Health Psychol 2018 10 24;23(12):1557-1565. Epub 2016 Jul 24.

1 Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia.

The aim of this study is to explore whether different coping strategies are able to mediate the association between Type D personality and quality of life. We collected information from 156 consecutive patients (response rate: 72.9%; 75.0% women; median age: 40 ± 3 years). Patients completed the Type D Scale-14, the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale and the Short-Form Health Survey for measuring physical and mental quality of life. The mediating effect of coping was analysed using correlations, linear regressions and the Sobel z-test. In the mental quality of life, all three studied coping strategies mediated the association between Type D personality and quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105316660180DOI Listing
October 2018

Sense of coherence as a mediator between hostility and health-related quality of life among coronary heart disease patients.

Heart Lung 2016 Mar-Apr;45(2):126-31. Epub 2016 Jan 8.

Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To explore the association between hostility and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, and whether these associations are mediated by sense of coherence (SOC).

Background: Intervention research has shown that a decrease in levels of hostility leads to an increase of HRQoL among individuals with CHD. However, the mechanisms that link hostility and HRQoL in CHD patients are not clear.

Methods: 509 CHD patients (mean age 58.8 ± 7.3, 29.3% female) were examined.

Results: Hostility was associated with poorer mental HRQoL. Adding SOC to the model weakened the strength of the association between hostility and mental HRQoL. The effect of hostility on mental HRQoL was explained for 61.9% by SOC. Neither hostility nor SOC was associated with physical HRQoL.

Conclusions: Our findings indicate that low SOC may partially explain the adverse effect of hostility on low mental HRQoL in CHD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2015.11.004DOI Listing
October 2016

Self-esteem, social participation, and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis.

J Health Psychol 2017 07 12;22(8):984-992. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

1 Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Slovakia.

The aim of this study is to explore whether self-esteem and social participation are associated with the physical and mental quality of life (Physical Component Summary, Mental Component Summary) and whether self-esteem can mediate the association between these variables. We collected information from 118 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients. Age, gender, disease duration, disability status, and participation were significant predictors of Physical Component Summary, explaining 55.4 percent of the total variance. Self-esteem fully mediated the association between social participation and Mental Component Summary (estimate/standard error = -4.872; p < 0.001) and along with disability status explained 48.3 percent of the variance in Mental Component Summary. These results can be used in intervention and educational programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105315621778DOI Listing
July 2017

Social participation in early and established rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Disabil Rehabil 2016 19;38(12):1172-9. Epub 2015 Aug 19.

a Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, Safarik University Kosice , Kosice , Slovak Republic .

Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine whether rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with different levels of restriction in social participation differ in disease related as well as psychosocial variables and whether a similar pattern can be found among early and established RA patients.

Method: Two samples of RA patients with early (n = 97; age = 53 ± 12.3 years; disease duration = 2.8 ± 1.2 years; 76% women) and established (n = 143; age = 58 ± 10.3 years; disease duration = 16.1 ± 3.6 years; 86% women) were collected. The pattern of differences for the patients with different level of participation restriction (no restriction, mild, moderate or high restriction) was explored by the Jonckheere-Terpstra test.

Results: Significant differences were found between patients with different levels of social participation restrictions in both samples in pain, fatigue, functional disability, anxiety, depression and mastery. Generally, it was found that patients with higher restrictions experienced more pain and fatigue, more anxiety and depression and reported lower mastery. Similar pattern of differences concerning disease activity and self-esteem was found mainly in the established group.

Conclusions: The study shows that the level of perceived restrictions in social participation are highly relevant regarding the disease related variables such as pain, fatigue and functional disability as well as psychological status and personal resources in both early and established RA.

Implications For Rehabilitation: Supporting involvement and participation of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis is important for decreasing the impact of RA symptoms on everyday life. Recognition and empowerment of individual resources such a mastery and self-esteem of RA patients could be beneficial for overcoming restrictions in participation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2015.1076071DOI Listing
January 2017

Elderly from lower socioeconomic groups are more vulnerable to mental health problems, but area deprivation does not contribute: a comparison between Slovak and Dutch cities.

Eur J Public Health 2017 05;27(suppl_2):80-85

5 Department of Community and Occupational Health, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Little is known about factors associated with mental health problems (MHP) of the elderly in socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods, and comparisons between Central European and Western European countries on this topic are lacking. We examined whether MHP occurred more frequently in deprived neighbourhoods and among deprived people. Next, we examined whether the association of MHP with area deprivation differed by country and whether this could be explained by the socioeconomic (SE) characteristics of the residents. We obtained data on non-institutionalized residents aged 65 years and above from the EU-FP7: EURO-URHIS 2 project from Slovak ( N = 665, response rate 44.0%) and Dutch cities ( N = 795, response rate 50.2%). An elevated score on General Health Questionnaire-12 (≥2) indicated MHP. Education and household income with financial strain were used as measures of individual SE status. We employed multilevel logistic regression. Overall rates of MHP were significantly higher in Slovakia (40.6%) than in the Netherlands (30.6%). The neighbourhood unemployment rate was not associated with the mental health of elderly in either country. Rates of MHP were significantly higher among elderly with low and medium income [odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-2.62; OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.12-2.41, respectively] and financial strain (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.56-3.28) when compared with those with high income and no strain, respectively. Individual-level SE characteristics explained differences between the two countries. The risk of MHP among the elderly is associated with their individual-level SE position but not with neighbourhood deprivation in both Slovakia and the Netherlands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckv096DOI Listing
May 2017

Are area-level and individual-level socioeconomic factors associated with self-rated health in adult urban citizens? Evidence from Slovak and Dutch cities.

Eur J Public Health 2017 05;27(suppl_2):86-92

1 Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, Safarik University, Kosice, Slovak Republic.

Background: Evidence shows that living in disadvantaged areas is associated with poor health. This may be due to the socioeconomic (SE) characteristics of both these residents and the areas where they live. Evidence regarding this on Central European (CE) countries is scarce. Our aim was to assess whether the prevalence of poor self-rated health (SRH) was higher in deprived urban areas, whether this can be explained by individual SE status (SES) and whether this differed between Slovakia and the Netherlands per age group. We examined the association of urban-level data and individual-level SE factors from different urban areas in different countries (Slovakia, the Netherlands) using comparable urban health indicators and area indicators. We also obtained unique data from the EU-FP7 EURO-URHIS 2 project. Multilevel logistic regression showed that poor SRH was associated with area deprivation in both countries. Regarding age by country, poor SRH occurred more frequently in the more deprived areas for the younger age group (≤64) in the Netherlands but for the older age group (≥65 years) in Slovakia. Moreover, Slovak citizens reported poor SRH significantly more often than Dutch residents. Individual SES was significantly associated with poor SRH in both age groups and both countries for most area-level SE measures. Individual SES is associated with SRH more strongly than area deprivation. Therefore, it is important to account for relative deprivation at an individual level when considering health-enhancing activities. Moreover, the effect of urban-area deprivation seems to differ between CE and WE countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckv095DOI Listing
May 2017

Importance of an individual's evaluation of functional status for health-related quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Disabil Health J 2015 Jul 10;8(3):372-9. Epub 2015 Mar 10.

Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia; Department of Community & Occupational Health, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.

Background: Quantifying the clinical impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most important determinants for optimizing individual patient care. Useful clinical measures for MS can be evaluated from different perspectives.

Objective/hypothesis: This cross-sectional study compared physical disability and functional status as assessed by a neurologist and by a patient and explored how they are associated with the health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

Methods: We collected data from 223 patients. One neurologist scored functional disability using the Kurtzke's Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and patients evaluated their functional status using the Incapacity Status Scale (ISS). HRQoL was assessed using the Physical and Mental Component Summary (PCS, MCS) of the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Multiple linear regressions were applied to analyze the data.

Results: Total EDSS and ISS scores correlated significantly (r = .67; p ≤ .001). Regression analyses showed that EDSS was significantly related to PCS, but not to MCS. After adding ISS into the analysis the association between EDSS and PCS became non-significant. ISS contributed significantly to the explained variance in both models. The final model explained 49% of the total variance for PCS and 15% for MCS.

Conclusions: Functional disability as measured by a neurologist (EDSS) is associated with PCS, but not with MCS, whereas functional disability as measured by patients (ISS) is significantly associated with both HRQoL dimensions. Neurologists should target their attention more on patients' evaluations of their functional status in order to detect the most bothersome problems that are affecting a patient's quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2015.02.006DOI Listing
July 2015

The mediating effect of coping on the association between fatigue and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Psychol Health Med 2015 16;20(6):653-61. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

a Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health , Safarik University , Kosice , Slovakia.

Fatigue, as one of the most frequent symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), has various adverse effects on the physical and mental health-related quality of life (PCS, MCS) of patients. The aim of this study was to explore whether coping mediates the relationship between fatigue and PCS and MCS. We collected data from 154 consecutive MS patients (76.0% women; mean age 40.0 ± 9.9). Patients completed the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) and the coping self-efficacy scale. The mediating effect of coping was analysed using linear regressions and the Sobel z-test. In PCS significant mediation was found in some of the fatigue dimensions (general, physical and reduced Motivation), while in MCS, it was significant in all dimensions. These results can be implemented into educational programmes for patients, their caregivers or physicians, and can also be helpful in the treatment process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2015.1032310DOI Listing
April 2016

Seven years' mortality in Roma and non-Roma patients after coronary angiography.

Eur J Public Health 2015 Oct 30;25(5):765-9. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

5 Department of Community & Occupational Health, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Ethnicity is associated with differences in clinical course and outcomes of cardiac disease, often in association with a poorer socioeconomic position. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality after coronary angiography (CAG) of Roma and non-Roma patients matched for education and adjusted for gender and age.

Methods: In total, 816 patients were included in the study (167 Roma and 649 non-Roma). Data on socio-demographic background, disease history, use of drugs, coronary findings and type of treatment were obtained from medical records. Mortality was assessed up to seven years after CAG. Kaplan-Meier curves of mortality were plotted, and differences between the Roma and non-Roma patients were assessed using log-rank tests, matched for education and adjusted for gender and age.

Results: Mortality after CAG was significantly higher among Roma than non-Roma (log-rank test χ(2) = 7.59, P < 0.01) and remained so after matching for education and adjustment for gender, age, history of previous myocardial infarction and abnormal CAG (hazard ratio: 2.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.82).

Conclusion: Mortality after CAG is higher among Roma, and this is not due to differences in age, gender or education. These results warrant further reconsideration of the management of Roma cardiac patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckv057DOI Listing
October 2015