Publications by authors named "Ivannah Pottier"

8 Publications

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Production of early and late nuclear DNA damage and extracellular 8-oxodG in normal human skin fibroblasts after carbon ion irradiation compared to X-rays.

Toxicol In Vitro 2018 10 4;52:116-121. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

CLCC François Baclesse, 3 avenue du Général Harris, 14076 Caen, France; Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, UNIROUEN, ABTE, 14000 Caen, France; SAPHYN (ARCHADE Program), 3 avenue du Général Harris, 14076 Caen, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2018.06.004DOI Listing
October 2018

Comparative study of diesel and biodiesel exhausts on lung oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rats.

Environ Pollut 2018 Apr 8;235:514-524. Epub 2018 Jan 8.

Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, UNIROUEN, ABTE, 14000 Caen et 76000, Rouen, France; Centre François Baclesse, Caen, France. Electronic address:

The contribution of diesel exhaust to atmospheric pollution is a major concern for public health, especially in terms of occurrence of lung cancers. The present study aimed at addressing the toxic effects of a repeated exposure to these emissions in an animal study performed under strictly controlled conditions. Rats were repeatedly exposed to the exhaust of diesel engine. Parameters such as the presence of a particle filter or the use of gasoil containing rapeseed methyl ester were investigated. Various biological parameters were monitored in the lungs to assess the toxic and genotoxic effects of the exposure. First, a transcriptomic analysis showed that some pathways related to DNA repair and cell cycle were affected to a limited extent by diesel but even less by biodiesel. In agreement with occurrence of a limited genotoxic stress in the lungs of diesel-exposed animals, small induction of γ-H2AX and acrolein adducts was observed but not of bulky adducts and 8-oxodGuo. Unexpected results were obtained in the study of the effect of the particle filter. Indeed, exhausts collected downstream of the particle filter led to a slightly higher induction of a series of genes than those collected upstream. This result was in agreement with the formation of acrolein adducts and γH2AX. On the contrary, induction of oxidative stress remained very limited since only SOD was found to be induced and only when rats were exposed to biodiesel exhaust collected upstream of the particle filter. Parameters related to telomeres were identical in all groups. In summary, our results point to a limited accumulation of damage in lungs following repeated exposure to diesel exhausts when modern engines and relevant fuels are used. Yet, a few significant effects are still observed, mostly after the particle filter, suggesting a remaining toxicity associated with the gaseous or nano-particular phases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.077DOI Listing
April 2018

An HPLC-ECD method for monoamines and metabolites quantification in cuttlefish (cephalopod) brain tissue.

Biomed Chromatogr 2016 Aug 12;30(8):1175-83. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Normandie Université, CS F-14032 Caen, France.

The cuttlefish belongs to the mollusk class Cephalopoda, considered as the most advanced marine invertebrates and thus widely used as models to study the biology of complex behaviors and cognition, as well as their related neurochemical mechanisms. Surprisingly, methods to quantify the biogenic monoamines and their metabolites in cuttlefish brain remain sparse and measure a limited number of analytes. This work aims to validate an HPLC-ECD method for the simultaneous quantification of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and their main metabolites in cuttlefish brain. In comparison and in order to develop a method suitable to answer both ecological and biomedical questions, the validation was also carried out on a phylogenetically remote species: mouse (mammals). The method was shown to be accurate, precise, selective, repeatable and sensitive over a wide range of concentrations for 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, serotonin, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and norepinephrine in the both extracts of cuttlefish and mouse brain, though with low precision and recovery for 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylethylene glycol. Homovanillic acid, accurately studied in rodents, was not detectable in the brain of cuttlefish. Overall, we described here the first fully validated HPLC method for the routine measurement of both monoamines and metabolites in cuttlefish brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmc.3663DOI Listing
August 2016

Dramatic increase in oxidative stress in carbon-irradiated normal human skin fibroblasts.

PLoS One 2013 23;8(12):e85158. Epub 2013 Dec 23.

LARIA (Laboratoire d'Accueil et de Recherche avec les Ions Accélérés), CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) - DSV (Direction des Sciences du Vivant) - IRCM (Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire), Caen, France.

Skin complications were recently reported after carbon-ion (C-ion) radiation therapy. Oxidative stress is considered an important pathway in the appearance of late skin reactions. We evaluated oxidative stress in normal human skin fibroblasts after carbon-ion vs. X-ray irradiation. Survival curves and radiobiological parameters were calculated. DNA damage was quantified, as were lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein carbonylation and antioxidant enzyme activities. Reduced and oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) were determined. Proinflammatory cytokine secretion in culture supernatants was evaluated. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of C-ions vs. X-rays was 4.8 at D₀ (irradiation dose corresponding to a surviving fraction of 37%). Surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was 71.8% and 7.6% for X-rays and C-ions, respectively. Compared with X-rays, immediate DNA damage was increased less after C-ions, but a late increase was observed at D(10%) (irradiation dose corresponding to a surviving fraction of 10%). LPO products and protein carbonyls were only increased 24 hours after C-ions. After X-rays, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was strongly increased immediately and on day 14 at D(0%) (irradiation dose corresponding to a surviving fraction of around 0%), catalase activity was unchanged and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was increased only on day 14. These activities were decreased after C-ions compared with X-rays. GSH/GSSG was unchanged after X-rays but was decreased immediately after C-ion irradiation before an increase from day 7. Secretion of IL-6 was increased at late times after X-ray irradiation. After C-ion irradiation, IL-6 concentration was increased on day 7 but was lower compared with X-rays at later times. C-ion effects on normal human skin fibroblasts seemed to be harmful in comparison with X-rays as they produce late DNA damage, LPO products and protein carbonyls, and as they decrease antioxidant defences. Mechanisms leading to this discrepancy between the two types of radiation should be investigated.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0085158PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3871598PMC
October 2014

Detection of extracellular 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine as a biomarker of oxidative damage in X-irradiated fibroblast cultures: optimization of analytical procedure.

Biomarkers 2010 Dec 24;15(8):707-14. Epub 2010 Sep 24.

Groupe Régional d'Etudes sur le Cancer - UPRES EA 1772 - IFR 146, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie and Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer François Baclesse, Caen, France.

We have developed a simple methodology, based on single-step solid-phase extraction followed by isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD), to determine extracellular 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in culture supernatants of normal human dermal fibroblasts. A standard addition method, using externally added 8-oxodG (0.5 and 1 pmol) was employed to eliminate matrix effects arising from the chemically complex, protein-rich medium. Secondly, applying this procedure to X-ray irradiated fibroblasts, we report a significant twofold increase in the levels of 8-oxodG at the radiobiologically relevant dose of 6 Gy. This suggests that extracellular 8-oxodG might be a useful biomarker for oxidative stress following moderate doses of X-irradiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/1354750X.2010.511269DOI Listing
December 2010

Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: Geotrichum candidum.

Int J Food Microbiol 2008 Sep 22;126(3):327-32. Epub 2007 Aug 22.

Laboratoire de Microbiologie Alimentaire EA 3213, ISBIO, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex, France.

Geotrichum candidum is a ubiquitous filamentous yeast-like fungus commonly isolated from soil, air, water, milk, silage, plant tissues, digestive tract in humans and other mammals. This species is widely used as adjunct culture in the maturation of cheese. The genus Geotrichum is composed of 18 species. A recent taxonomic revision concluded that the old Galactomyces geotrichum/G. candidum complex contained four separate species of which Galactomyces candidus sp. nov./G. candidum. M13 primer can be used for identifying species of the Geotrichum genus. Used in combination, RAPD-PCR and RAM-PCR permit strains to be differentiated. The species can be unambiguous differentiated from the two species most frequently described in human pathology: Geotrichum clavatum (reclassified Saprochaete clavata) and Geotrichum capitatum (reclassified Magnusiomyces capitatus/Saprochaete capitata). Sources of exposure are food ingestion--cheese consumption playing a major role--inhalation and contact. A bibliographic survey was conducted to assess corresponding hazards and risks. G. candidum infections (mainly pulmonary or bronchopulmonary, but also cutaneous, oral, disseminates) are very rare: fewer than 100 cases reported between 1842 and 2006. Moreover, cases were not all confirmed by repeated isolations and demonstration of the fungus' presence in tissues, a prerequisite to establish a true diagnosis of geotrichosis. Immunocompromised population was recently shown as a target for opportunistic infection. The most effective treatments include either azole drogs as ketonazole, iconazole and clotrimazole, or polyene antibiotics as amphotericin B, nystatin and pimaricin, or voriconazole-amphotericin B association. Less than 1 case/year of disease was possibly caused by G. candidum and it never included dairy products or foodborne infection. The risk of developing an infection due to G. candidum in connection with its technological use and consumption of dairy products is virtually nil. For these reasons, G. candidum should be proposed for QPS status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2007.08.021DOI Listing
September 2008

Identification of slow and fast-acting toxins in a highly ciguatoxic barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) by HPLC/MS and radiolabelled ligand binding.

Toxicon 2003 Nov;42(6):663-72

Laboratoire de Microbiologie Alimentaire USC INRA, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, Caen 14032, France.

A barracuda implicated in ciguatera fish poisoning in Guadeloupe was estimated to have an overall flesh toxicity of 15 MUg/g using mouse bioassay. A lipid soluble extract was separated into two toxic fractions, FrA and FrB, on a LH20 Sephadex column eluted with dichloromethane/methanol (1:1). When intraperitoneal injected into mice, FrA provoked symptoms characteristic of slow-acting ciguatoxins, whereas FrB produced symptoms indicative of fast-acting toxins (FAT). High performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/radio-ligand binding (HPLC/MS/RLB) analysis confirmed the two fractions were distinct, because only a weak overlap of some compounds was observed. HPLC/MS/RLB analysis revealed C-CTX-1 as the potent toxin present in FrA, and two coeluting active compounds at m/z 809.43 and 857.42 in FrB, all displaying the characteristic pattern of ion formation for hydroxy-polyethers. Other C-CTX congeners and putative hydroxy-polyether-like compounds were detected in both fractions, however, the RLB found them inactive. C-CTX-1 accounted for > 90% of total toxicity in this barracuda and was confirmed to be a competitive inhibitor of brevetoxin binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) with a potency two-times lower than P-CTX-1. However, FAT active on VSSCs and < 900 Da were suspected to contribute to the overall toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2003.09.004DOI Listing
November 2003

Characterisation of multiple Caribbean ciguatoxins and congeners in individual specimens of horse-eye jack (Caranx latus) by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

Toxicon 2002 Jul;40(7):929-39

Laboratoire de Microbiologie Alimentaire, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex, France.

We studied the variation in toxin profiles of purified extracts of 10 individual specimens and two pools of ciguateric Caranx latus. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) identified in all individual samples at least seven Caribbean ciguatoxins (C-CTXs) comprising C-CTX-1 and its epimer C-CTX-2 ([M+H](+) m/z 1141.58), and five new C-CTX congeners with pseudo-molecular ions at m/z 1141.58, 1143.60, 1157.57, 1159.58, and 1127.57. In some samples, additional C-CTX isomers were detected with [M+H](+) ions at m/z 1141.58 (two), 1143.60 (one) and 1157.57 (two). The two low-toxic pools contained only four to six ciguatoxins. The comparison in relative proportions of four different mass classes ([M+H](+) at m/z 1141, 1143, 1157 and 1127) showed that the group at m/z 1157 increased (2-20%) with flesh toxicity. More than 80% of group m/z 1141 comprised C-CTX-1, C-CTX-2 and their isomer C-CTX-1a whose level in this group correlated with fish toxicity. Contrary to low-toxic fishes, high-risk specimens had C-CTX-1 levels <50% and were subjected to large losses of activity on purification indicating that unstable ciguatoxins were present. A possible conversion of C-CTX-1 into C-CTX-1a was identified when flesh was cooked, without changes in toxicity. In conclusion, HPLC/MS characterised 12 C-CTXs accumulated by C. latus at variable levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0041-0101(02)00088-0DOI Listing
July 2002