Publications by authors named "Ivana Eichlerová"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ligninolytic Enzyme Production and Decolorization Capacity of Synthetic Dyes by Saprotrophic White Rot, Brown Rot, and Litter Decomposing .

J Fungi (Basel) 2020 Nov 19;6(4). Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

An extensive screening of saprotrophic causing white rot (WR), brown rot (BR), or litter decomposition (LD) for the production of laccase and Mn-peroxidase (MnP) and decolorization of the synthetic dyes Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) was performed. The study considered in total 150 strains belonging to 77 species. The aim of this work was to compare the decolorization and ligninolytic capacity among different ecophysiological and taxonomic groups of WR strains decolorized both dyes most efficiently; high decolorization capacity was also found in some LD fungi. The enzyme production was recorded in all three ecophysiology groups, but to a different extent. All WR and LD fungi produced laccase, and the majority of them also produced MnP. The strains belonging to BR lacked decolorization capabilities. None of them produced MnP and the production of laccase was either very low or absent. The most efficient decolorization of both dyes and the highest laccase production was found among the members of the orders and The strains with high MnP activity occurred across almost all fungal orders and Synthetic dye decolorization by fungal strains was clearly related to their production of ligninolytic enzymes and both properties were determined by the interaction of their ecophysiology and taxonomy, with a more relevant role of ecophysiology. Our screening revealed 12 strains with high decolorization capacity (9 WR and 3 LD), which could be promising for further biotechnological utilization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jof6040301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7711621PMC
November 2020

Long term storage of Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor isolates using different cryopreservation techniques and its impact on laccase activity.

Fungal Biol 2015 Dec 22;119(12):1345-1353. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

The strain Pleurotus ostreatus Florida f6, its 45 basidiospore-derived isolates (both monokaryons and dikaryons prepared in our laboratory), Trametes versicolor strain CCBAS 614 and 22 other T. versicolor isolates obtained from the sporocarps collected in distant localities were successfully preserved for 12 y using perlite and straw cryopreservation protocols. All tested isolates survived a 12-year storage in liquid nitrogen (LN) and their laccase production and Poly B411 decolorization capacity was preserved. Also mycelium extension rate and the types of colony appearance of individual isolates remained unchanged. Different cryopreservation techniques were also tested for the short time (24 h) and the long time (6 m) storage of the culture liquid with extracellular laccase produced by T. versicolor strain CCBAS 614. The results showed that 10 % glycerol was the most suitable cryopreservant. The absence of the cryopreservant did not cause high loss of laccase activity in the samples; the presence of DMSO (5 or 10 %) in LN-stored samples caused mostly a decrease of laccase activity. For the preservation of laccase activity in the liquid culture the storage in the freezer at -80 °C is more convenient than the storage in liquid nitrogen.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2015.10.004DOI Listing
December 2015

Laccase activity in soils: considerations for the measurement of enzyme activity.

Chemosphere 2012 Aug 2;88(10):1154-60. Epub 2012 Apr 2.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

Laccases (benzenediol: oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) are copper-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidative conversion of a variety of chemicals, such as mono-, oligo-, and polyphenols and aromatic amines. Laccases have been proposed to participate in the transformation of organic matter and xenobiotics as well as microbial interactions. Several laccase assays have been proposed and used in soils. Here, we show that the optimal pH conditions for the laccase substrates 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS, pH 3-5), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (4-5.5), L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA; 4-6), guaiacol (3.5-5), 4-methylcatechol (3.5-5), and syringaldazine (5.5-7.0) are similar between purified laccases from Trametes versicolor and Pyricularia sp. and soil extracts; the substrate affinities of purified enzymes (K(M)) and soil extracts were also similar. The laccase assays showed specificity overlap with tyrosinase and ligninolytic peroxidases when hydrogen peroxide is present. The ABTS oxidation assay is able to reliably detect the presence of 13.5 pg mL(-1) or 0.199×10(-12) mol mL(-1) of T. versicolor laccase, which is three times more sensitive than the 2,6-dimethoxyphenol-based assay and more than 40 times more sensitive than any of the other assays. The low molecular mass soil-derived compounds and the isolated fulvic and humic acids influence the laccase assays and should be removed from the soil extracts before measurements of the enzyme activity are performed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.03.019DOI Listing
August 2012

Effect of long-term preservation of basidiomycetes on perlite in liquid nitrogen on their growth, morphological, enzymatic and genetic characteristics.

Fungal Biol 2010 Nov-Dec;114(11-12):929-35. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

The macro- and micro-morphological features, mycelial extension rate, enzymatic activities and possible genetic changes were studied in 30 selected strains of basidiomycetes after 10-year cryopreservation on perlite in liquid nitrogen (LN). Comparisons with the same strains preserved by serial transfers on nutrient media at 4°C were also conducted. Production of ligninolytic enzymes and hydrogen peroxide was studied by quantitative spectrophotometric methods, whereas semiquantitative API ZYM testing was used to compare the levels of a wide range of hydrolytic enzymes. Our results show that cryopreservation in LN did not cause morphological changes in any isolate. The vitality of all fungi was successfully preserved and none of the physiological features were lost, even though the extension rate and enzyme activity were slightly affected. Moreover, sequence analysis of eight strains did not detect any changes in their genetic features after cryopreservation. These findings suggest that the perlite-based freezing protocol is suitable for long-term preservation of large numbers of basidiomycetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2010.08.009DOI Listing
February 2011

Decolorization of Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens: toxicological evaluation and morphological study.

Chemosphere 2007 Oct 29;69(5):795-802. Epub 2007 Jun 29.

Institute of Microbiology AS CR, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

Dichomitus squalens efficiently decolorized both Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) at concentrations of 0.5gl(-1) and 3gl(-1) in static and shaken culture and also on solid medium within 14d. The presence of the dyes in the culture medium mostly caused a decrease in biomass production and in growth rate, which was more significant in the case of RBBR. After 14d of cultivation, electron microscopy showed substantial morphological changes in mycelia of D. squalens growing in media containing dyes. The hyphae deformations were more intensively manifested in solid media than in liquid culture. In all the cases, the morphological changes were more prominent in the presence of RBBR. Higher concentrations of both dyes brought about more intensive changes. The toxicity of synthetic dyes Orange G and RBBR was tested using a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of duckweed Lemna minor. Two endpoints such as the number of fronds and their weight were studied during the bioassay. The results showed higher toxicity of RBBR than that of Orange G. The toxicity of both dyes decreased after the decolorization process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.04.083DOI Listing
October 2007

The influence of extracellular H2O2 production on decolorization ability in fungi.

J Basic Microbiol 2006 ;46(6):449-55

Institute of Microbiology AS CR, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

A set of 50 randomly chosen fungal strains belonging to different basidiomycete species was tested for H2O2 and ligninolytic enzyme production and for decolorization of synthetic dyes Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R. The decolorization capacity of individual strains was influenced by the level of H2O2 and laccase activity. The strains producing H2O2 at a concentration of 1.0-1.5 microM exhibited the most efficient decolorization; higher or lower H2O2 concentration reduced this ability. None of the strains without a detectable laccase activity was able to decolorize the tested dyes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jobm.200610064DOI Listing
February 2007

Influence of dimethyl sulfoxide on extracellular enzyme production by Pleurotus ostreatus.

Biotechnol Lett 2006 May;28(9):651-5

Department of Biology, Dowling College, NY 11769, USA.

Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used as a co-solvent to dissolve poorly water-soluble biologically active agents to assess their biological activities such as for enzyme induction. The question addressed was whether DMSO can be assumed to be an inert co-solvent. The influence of DMSO on the production of extracellular enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus was investigated. DMSO functioned as either an inducer or a repressor, depending on the enzyme studied. The production of laccase and endo-1,4-beta-xylanase increased by 29 and 250%, respectively, in presence of DMSO. However, DMSO repressed the activities of manganese peroxidase, beta-glucosidase, beta-xylanase, and endo-1,4-beta-glucanase by 30, 33, 99 and 16%, respectively. These results raise concerns about the interpretation of bioactivity measurements when DMSO is assumed to function as an inert co-solvent to solubilize water-insoluble molecules.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-006-0031-6DOI Listing
May 2006

Synthetic dye decolorization capacity of white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens.

Bioresour Technol 2006 Nov 27;97(16):2153-9. Epub 2005 Oct 27.

Institute of Microbiology AS CR, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

The ability to decolorize eight chemically different synthetic dyes (Orange G, Amaranth, Orange I, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR), Cu-phthalocyanin, Poly R-478, Malachite Green and Crystal Violet) by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens was evaluated on agar plates. The fungus showed high decolorization capacity and was able to decolorize all dyes tested, but not to the same extent. Some of the dyes did not limit the decolorization capacity of the strain tested even at a concentration of 2g/l. The presence of the dyes in solid media reduced the mycelial growth rate of D. squalens; a positive correlation was found between the growth rate and the decolorization ability. Decolorization of Orange G and RBBR was studied also in liquid culture, where both dyes caused an enhancement of ligninolytic enzyme and overall hydrogen peroxide production and a decrease of biomass production. RBBR was removed to a higher extent than Orange G.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2005.09.014DOI Listing
November 2006

Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R decolorization by white rot fungi Dichomitus squalens, Ischnoderma resinosum and Pleurotus calyptratus.

Chemosphere 2005 Jul;60(3):398-404

Institute of Microbiology AS CR, Vídenská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

Thirty different white rot strains were screened for Orange G and Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) decolorization on agar plates. Three promising strains, Dichomitus squalens, Ischnoderma resinosum and Pleurotus calyptratus, selected on the basis of this screening, were used for decolorization study in liquid media. All three strains efficiently decolorized both Orange G and RBBR, but they differed in decolorization capacity depending on cultivation conditions and ligninolytic enzyme production. Two different decolorization patterns were found in these strains: Orange G decolorization in I. resinosum and P. calyptratus was caused mainly by laccase, while RBBR decolorization was effected by manganese peroxidase (MnP); in D. squalens laccase and MnP cooperated in the decolorization processes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2004.12.036DOI Listing
July 2005