Publications by authors named "Iván Chulvi-Medrano"

28 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Integrative Neuromuscular Training Enhances Physical Fitness in 6- to 14-Year-Old Rugby Players.

J Strength Cond Res 2021 Jun 11. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

Department of General and Specific Didactics, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain; Tamara Rial Exercise and Women's Health, Newtown, Pennsylvania; Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey Ewing, Ewing, New Jersey; and Department of Physical and Sports Education, Faculty of Sciences Physical Activity and Sport, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract: Alonso-Aubin, DA, Picón-Martínez, M, Rebullido, TR, Faigenbaum, AD, Cortell-Tormo, JM, and Chulvi-Medrano, I. Integrative neuromuscular training enhances physical fitness in 6- to 14-year-old rugby players. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2021-The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an 8-week integrative neuromuscular training (INT) program on physical fitness measures in young rugby players. A sample of 138 male rugby players (age range, 6-14 years) was divided into 5 age-related groups: group 1 (G1) (n = 20; age, 7.05 (0.58)), group 2 (G2) (n = 27; age, 8.57 (0.49)), group 3 (G3) (n = 31; age, 11.02 (0.56)), group 4 (G4) (n = 33; age, 13.12 (0.58), and group 5 (G5) (n = 27; age, 14.85 (1.53) and additionally into 2 game position groups: forwards (FOR) (n = 69) and backs (BAC) (n = 69). Physical fitness measures included the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), dominant and nondominant hand-to-eye coordination, sprint capacity, core muscular endurance, and lower- and upper-body power. Integrative neuromuscular training (INT) included progressive strength, coordination, and speed exercises performed twice per week for 20 minutes. Following INT, significant improvements in selected age-related groups (p < 0.01) were found in total FMS score G3 (effect size [ES] = 0.47), G4 (ES = 0.88), and G5 (ES = 0.58); dominant hand-to-eye coordination G1 (ES = 1.48), G2 (ES = 0.71), G3 (ES = 0.55), G4 (ES = 1.47), and G5 (ES = 1.15), nondominant hand-to-eye coordination G2 (ES = 0.74), G4 (ES = 1.34), and G5 (ES = 1.09); lower-body power G2 (ES = 0.44), G4 (ES = 0.39), and G5 (ES = 0.43); core muscular endurance G1 (ES = 0.82), G3 (ES = 0.68), and G4 (ES = 1.04); upper-body power G2 (ES = 0.53); and sprint capacity G4 (ES = 0.69). Significant improvements were also found between player's positions for all tests. These findings indicate that a progressive INT program can enhance functional movement abilities and selected physical fitness measures in young rugby players regardless of game position and age.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003995DOI Listing
June 2021

The effect of exercise training on blood pressure in menopause and postmenopausal women: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

Maturitas 2021 Jul 24;149:40-55. Epub 2021 May 24.

Physiotherapy and Sports Rehabilitation Research Group, Catholic University of Murcia.| San Antonio Catholic University of Murcia: Universidad Catolica San Antonio de Murcia.

The prevalence of hypertension is higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Regular exercise training has been shown to be effective in addressing hypertension. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the effect of exercise training on systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal and postmenopausal women. This review was reported according to the PRISMA statement and registered in PROSPERO. The literature search was done in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL and ClinicalTrials. Randomized controlled trials involving menopausal and postmenopausal women undergoing exercise training were included. Two blinded reviewers assessed risk of bias in the included studies by using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. A random-effects model was used for all analyses. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Compared with the control group, exercise training resulted in clinically significant reductions on SBP (MD -3.43 mmHg; 95% CI, -5.16, -1.71; P < 0.0001), DBP (MD, -2.25 mmHg; 95% CI, -3.40, -1.11; P = 0.0001) and MAP (MD, -3.48 mmHg; 95% CI, -5.84, -1.11; P = 0.004). Aerobic training (AT) did not produce a significant reduction in SBP, DBP and MAP (P >0.05). Combined training (CT) generated larger reductions. Exercise training generated small but clinically relevant reductions in SBP, DBP and MAP in menopausal and postmenopausal women, younger or older than 65 years, with prehypertension or hypertension. AT did not lead to a clinically relevant improvement in blood pressure (BP) in this population. In addition, CT showed the largest reductions in SBP, DBP and MAP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2021.05.005DOI Listing
July 2021

Strength and Power Characteristics in National Amateur Rugby Players.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 05 24;18(11). Epub 2021 May 24.

UIRFIDE (Sport Performance and Physical Fitness Research Group), Department of Physical and Sports Education, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain.

Rugby players need muscular strength and power to meet the demands of the sport; therefore, a proper assessment of the performance in rugby players should include both variables. The purpose of this study was to examine the strength and power characteristics (SPC) during the squat (SQ) and bench press (BP) in national amateur rugby players and to analyze gender- and position-related differences. A total of 47 players (30 males and 17 females; age: 25.56 ± 1.14 and 23.16 ± 1.38 years, respectively) participated in the study. The one repetition-maximum (1-RM) and SPC in SQ and BP were obtained using a Smith Machine. Then, subjects performed one set of five repetitions on the SQ and BP against six relative loads (30-40-50-60-70-80% 1-RM) using a linear transducer. Differences between genders were found in 1-RM for maximal power, kilograms lifted at maximal power, maximal power, maximal strength and maximal speed in BP ( < 0.00) and 1-RM, kilograms lifted at maximal power, maximal power, maximal strength and maximal speed in SQ ( < 0.00). Comparisons between variables in SQ and BP present a significant relationship ( < 0.01) in SQ and BP 1-RM with kilograms lifted at maximal power = 0.86 and r = 0.84), maximal strength ( = 0.53 and = 0.92) and maximal power ( = 0.76 and = 0.93). This study confirms the importance of the SPC assessment for training prescription in rugby amateur players.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115615DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8197353PMC
May 2021

Acute Effects of Resistance Training with Blood Flow Restriction on Achilles Tendon Thickness.

J Hum Kinet 2021 Mar 31;78:101-109. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest and thickest tendons of the human body. Several studies have reported an immediate decrease in Achilles tendon thickness after a single bout of resistance training. However, the effects of blood flow restriction training on Achilles tendon thickness have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of different regimens of resistance training on Achilles tendon thickness. Fiftytwo participants (27.3 ± 7 years; 177.6 ± 11 cm; 72.2 ± 13.7 kg) were randomly allocated into one of the three groups: low-intensity exercise without (LI, n = 13) and with blood flow restriction (LI-BFR, n = 24), and high-intensity exercise (HI, n = 15). Participants from LI and LI-BFR groups performed four sets (1 x 30 + 3 x 15 reps) at 30% 1RM, while the HI group performed four sets (1 x 30 with 30% 1RM + 3 x 10 reps with 75% 1RM). All groups performed a plantar flexion exercise. For the LI-BFR group, a blood pressure cuff was placed on the dominant calf and inflated at 30% of the individual´s occlusion pressure (47.6 ± 19.8 mmHg). Sonographic images of Achilles tendon thickness were taken at pre, immediately after, 60 min and 24 h following acute bouts of exercise. Achilles tendon thickness was significantly reduced immediately after, 60 min and 24 h post-LI-BFR exercise (pre: 4.4 ± 0.4 mm vs. IA: 3.8 ± 0.4 mm vs. 60 min: 3.7 ± 0.3 mm vs. 24 h: 4.1 ± 0.3 mm; p < 0.001), whereas Achilles tendon thickness was unchanged for HI and LI groups (p > 0.05). These results suggest that blood flow restriction training may be an effective strategy to stimulate a positive response in Achilles tendon thickness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2021-0032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8120971PMC
March 2021

Association Between COL5a1, COL11a1, and COL11a2 Gene Variations and Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy in Young Athletes.

Clin J Sport Med 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Physiotherapy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, Faculty of Health Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia; Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, European University, Valencia, Spain; Physical and Sports Education Department, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; Department of Physiology, University de Valencia, Valencia, Spain; and Center for Translational Research in Physiotherapy, Department of Pathology and Surgery, Physiotherapy Area, Miguel Hernandez University, San Juan, Alicante, Spain.

Objective: Tendinopathy is a prevalent condition in young athletes and in older nonathletic people. Recent tendinopathy research has shown a growing interest in the role played by genetic factors, basically genes involved in collagen synthesis and regulation, in view of collagen disorganization typically present in tendon pathologies.

Design: A case-control, genotype-phenotype association study.

Setting: La Ribera Hospital, Valencia, Spain.

Participants: A group of 137 young athletes (49 with rotator cuff tendon pathology and 88 healthy counterparts) who played upper-limb-loading sports were clinically and ultrasound (US) assessed for rotator cuff tendinopathy were included.

Intervention: Genetic analysis was performed to determine whether there was a relationship between rotator cuff pathology and the genotype.

Main Outcome Measures: We hypothesized that the following single nucleotide polymorphisms: COL5a1 rs12722, COL11a1 rs3753841, COL11a1 rs1676486, and COL11a2 rs1799907 would be associated with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Results: A direct relationship between CC genotype and bilateral US pathological images was statistically significant (χ2 = 0.0051) and confirmed by the Fisher test, with a correlation coefficient of 0.345 and a Cramer's v of 0.26.

Conclusion: A significant association was found between COL5a1 rs12722 genotype and rotator cuff pathology, with the CC genotype conferring increased risk of tendon abnormalities and being associated with rotator cuff pathology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSM.0000000000000937DOI Listing
May 2021

Predicting the Unknown and the Unknowable. Are Anthropometric Measures and Fitness Profile Associated with the Outcome of a Simulated CrossFit Competition?

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 1;18(7). Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Department of Sports Sciences, Ramon Llull University, FPCEE Blanquerna, 08022 Barcelona, Spain.

The main objective of this research was to find associations between the outcome of a simulated CrossFit competition, anthropometric measures, and standardized fitness tests. Ten experienced male CrossFit athletes (age 28.8 ± 3.5 years; height 175 ± 10.0 cm; weight 80.3 ± 12.5 kg) participated in a simulated CrossFit competition with three benchmark workouts ("Fran", "Isabel", and "Kelly") and underwent fitness tests. Participants were tested for anthropometric measures, sit and reach, squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and Reactive Strength Index (RSI), and the load (LOAD) corresponding to the highest mean power value (POWER) in the snatch, bench press, and back squat exercises was determined using incremental tests. A bivariate correlation test and k-means cluster analysis to group individuals as either high-performance (HI) or low performance (LO) via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were carried out. Pearson's correlation coefficient two-tailed test showed that the only variable correlated with the final score was the snatch LOAD ( < 0.05). Six performance variables (SJ, CMJ, RSI, snatch LOAD, bench press LOAD, and back squat LOAD) explained 74.72% of the variance in a k = 2 means cluster model. When CrossFit performance groups HI and LO were compared to each other, -test revealed no difference at a ≤ 0.05 level. Snatch maximum power LOAD and the combination of six physical fitness tests partially explained the outcome of a simulated CrossFit competition. Coaches and practitioners can use these findings to achieve a better fit of the practices and workouts designed for their athletes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073692DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8037316PMC
April 2021

Effects of a HIIT Protocol on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Population.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 01 31;18(3). Epub 2021 Jan 31.

Research Group in Prevention and Health in Exercise and Sport, Department of Physical and Sports Education, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain.

Cardiovascular complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) people. Regular exercise is strongly recommended to these patients due to its preventive action against this type of disease. However, a large percentage of patients with T1DM people present a sedentary behavior, mainly, because of the fear of a post-exercise hypoglycemia event and lack of time. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an efficient and safe methodology since it prevents hypoglycemia and does not require much time, which are the main barriers for this population to doing exercise and increasing physical conditioning. Nineteen sedentary adults (37 ± 6.5 years) with T1DM were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of either HIIT, 12 bouts first 2 weeks, 16 bouts in weeks 3 and 4, and 20 bouts in the last two weeks x 30-s intervals interspersed with 1-min rest periods, performed thrice weekly or to control group, which did not train. VO, body composition, heart rate variability (HRV), and fasting glucose were measured as cardiovascular risk factors. We suggest that the 6-week HIIT program used in the present study is safe since no severe hypoglycemia was reported and is an effective strategy in improving VOmax, body composition, HRV, and fasting glucose, which are important cardiovascular risk factors in T1DM people.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7908515PMC
January 2021

The Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence among Adolescent Female Athletes: A Systematic Review.

J Funct Morphol Kinesiol 2021 Jan 28;6(1). Epub 2021 Jan 28.

UIRFIDE (Sport Performance and Physical Fitness Research Group), Department of Physical and Sports Education, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain.

This review aimed to synthesize the most up-to-date evidence regarding the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) among adolescent female athletes. We conducted a systematic review of studies regarding UI in female athletes less than 19 years of age. This review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRIMSA). The electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS) were searched between October and November 2020. After blinded peer evaluation, a total of 215 studies were identified and nine were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. This review identified a prevalence of UI in adolescent female athletes between 18% to 80% with an average of 48.58%. The most prevalent sports were trampolining followed by rope skipping. The prevalence of UI among adolescent female athletes practicing impact sports was significantly prevalent. There is a need for further research, education, and targeted interventions for adolescent female athletes with UI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfmk6010012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931053PMC
January 2021

A 47-Year Comparison of Lower Body Muscular Power in Spanish Boys: A Short Report.

J Funct Morphol Kinesiol 2020 Aug 20;5(3). Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628, USA.

Much of the evidence examining temporal trends in fitness among youth has found a decrease in measures of muscular strength and muscular power over recent decades. The aim of this study was to examine trends in lower body muscular power in Spanish boys over 47 years. In 1969 140 boys (10-11 years; body mass index = 19.24, SD = 2.91 kg/m) and in 2016, 113 boys (10-11 years; body mass index = 19.20, SD = 3.15 kg/m) were recruited. Lower body power was assessed using the vertical jump (VJ) and standing long jump (SLJ) tests. Significant differences and a large effect size were shown between groups in the SLJ ( = 0.001; d = 0.94) and the VJ ( = 0.001; d = 0.66). SLJ data in 1969 were higher (1.52 m, SD = 0.19) when compared to the 2016 data (1.34 m, SD = 0.18). The VJ performance of the 1969 sample was also higher (25.95 cm; SD = 6.58) than the 2016 sample (21.56 cm; SD = 4.72). SLJ and VJ performance of the 2016 group decreased 11.8% and 16.9%, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups in body mass index. The results indicate a secular decline in lower body muscular power in 10-11-year-old Spanish boys with no significant changes in body mass index over the 47-year study period.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfmk5030064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7739341PMC
August 2020

Effect of a HIIT protocol on the lower limb muscle power, ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance in a sedentary type 1 diabetes mellitus population: a pilot study.

PeerJ 2020 21;8:e10510. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Background: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is commonly associated with premature loss of muscle function, ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance. Those impairments, usually, lead to physical functionality deterioration. High-intensity interval training is an efficient and safety methodology since it prevents hypoglycemia and not requires much time, which are the main barriers for this population to practice exercise and increase physical conditioning. We hypothesized that a 6-week HIIT program performed on a cycle ergometer would increase lower limb muscle power, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and dynamic balance without hypoglycemic situations.

Methods: A total of 19 diagnosed T1DM subjects were randomly assigned to HIIT group ( = 11; 6-week HIIT protocol) or Control group ( = 8; no treatment). Lower limb strength was evaluated through velocity execution in squat with three different overloads. Weight bearing lunge test (WBLT) was performed to test ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and Y-Balance test (YBT) was the test conducted to analyze dynamic balance performance.

Results: Velocity in squat improved a 11.3%, 9.4% and 10.1% ( < 0.05) with the 50%, 60% and 70% of their own body mass overload respectively, WBLT performance increased a 10.43% in the right limb and 15.45% in the left limb. YBT showed improvements in all directions (right limb-left limb): Anterior (4.3-6.1%), Posteromedial (1.8-5.2%) and Posterolateral (3.4-4.5%) in HIIT group ( < 0.05), unlike control group that did not experience any significant change in any of the variables ( > 0.05).

Conclusion: A 6-week HIIT program is safe and effective to improve execution velocity in squat movement, a fundamental skill in daily living activities, as well as ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and dynamic balance to reduce foot ulcers, risk falls and functional impairments. HIIT seems an efficient and safety training methodology not only for overcome T1DM barriers for exercising but also for improving functional capacities in T1DM people.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.10510DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7759140PMC
December 2020

Effects of heavy barbell hip thrust vs back squat on subsequent sprint performance in rugby players.

Biol Sport 2020 Dec 5;37(4):325-331. Epub 2020 Jul 5.

Department of Human Physiology, Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Medicine, University of Málaga, Spain.

The objective of this research was to compare the effect of Post-Activation Performance Enhancement (PAPE) exerted on the back squat (BS) versus the barbell hip thrust (HT) on the sprint performance (5- and 10-m). 17 male amateur rugby players participated in the study (age 22.14 ± 2.52 years; body mass 81.06 ± 9.6 kg; height 1.78 ± 0.05 m). All participants performed a dynamic maximum strength test (3RM) in BS and HT at maximum speed. Two randomized sessions were performed inducing PAPE using BS or HT trough three series with three repetitions at 85% 1RM eight minutes before the sprint tests. An ANOVA of repeated measurement, found no differences in the time for 5-m (F = 0.398, P = 0.537, ηp = 0.024) or 10-m (F = 2.589, P = 0.127, ηp = 0.139). There were no significant differences in the Protocol effect between HT and BS in 5-m or 10-m (F = 2.963, P = 0.104, ηp = 0.156 and F = 1.472, P = 0.243 ηp = 0.084, respectively). There were also no differences in the Time x Protocol interaction at 5-m (F = 0.001, P = 0.976, ηp < 0.001) or 10-m (F = 4.174, P = 0.058, ηp = 0.207). The effect size obtained in the results of the sprint tests was small in both exercises (ES < 0.2). None of the BS or HT exercises performed with heavy load induced a significant PAPE phenomenon on the ability to sprint in rugby players.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/biolsport.2020.96316DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7725042PMC
December 2020

Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a hypopressive exercise program on postmenopausal cancer survivors: A pilot study.

J Bodyw Mov Ther 2020 Oct 22;24(4):484-489. Epub 2020 Feb 22.

Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, USA.

Background: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common symptom during and after cancer treatment that negatively affects the patient's quality of life. Exercise is one of the most effective non-pharmacological treatments for CRF. Multimodal exercise therapy programs that include hypopressive exercises, relaxation and myofascial release may be beneficial for CRF. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a multimodal program on CRF and lower limb functional strength in postmenopausal women diagnosed with cancer.

Methods: 7 postmenopausal women (age = 55.28 years; BMI = 26.05 kg/m2) who had a cancer diagnosis participated in a supervised and progressive 55-min class once per week for 12-weeks. CRF was measured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Cancer Related Fatigue 12 and lower limb strength was assessed with the sit and stand test.

Results: No adverse events were reported during the training period and all participants completed the exercise protocol. There was a significant increase (p = 0.01) in lower limb functional strength (pre: 19.60 (SD = 2.19) vs post: 24.60(SD = 2.19)) with an effect size of d = 2.28 and a decrease in CRF (p = 0.245) (pre: 29.36 ± 24.42; post: 17.85 ± 14.23) with a trivial effect size (d < 0.5).

Conclusions: These preliminary findings indicate that a supervised once per week multimodal program that includes hypopressive exercises for postmenopausal cancer survivors increased lower limb functional strength without exacerbating their CRF. These findings support further randomized trials of hypopressive training programs on patients with cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2020.02.019DOI Listing
October 2020

The Effects of Resistance Training on Blood Pressure in Preadolescents and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 10 28;17(21). Epub 2020 Oct 28.

UIRFIDE (Sport Performance and Physical Fitness Research Group), Department of Physical and Sports Education, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain.

The aim was to systematically review and meta-analyze the current evidence for the effects of resistance training (RT) on blood pressure (BP) as the main outcome and body mass index (BMI) in children and adolescents. Two authors systematically searched the PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science Core Collection and EMBASE electronic databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) children and adolescents (aged 8 to 18 years); (2) intervention studies including RT and (3) outcome measures of BP and BMI. The selected studies were analyzed using the Cochrane Risk-of-Bias Tool. Eight articles met inclusion criteria totaling 571 participants. The mean age ranged from 9.3 to 15.9 years and the mean BMI of 29.34 (7.24) kg/m). Meta-analysis indicated that RT reduced BMI significantly (mean difference (MD): -0.43 kg/m (95% CI: -0.82, -0.03), P = 0.03; I = 5%) and a non-significant decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (MD: -1.09 mmHg (95% CI: -3.24, 1.07), P = 0.32; I = 67%) and diastolic BP (DBP) (MD: -0.93 mmHg (95% CI: -2.05, 0.19), P = 0.10; I = 37%). Limited evidence suggests that RT has no adverse effects on BP and may positively affect BP in youths. More high-quality studies are needed to clarify the association between RT and BP in light of body composition changes throughout childhood and adolescence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217900DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7663568PMC
October 2020

Is Low-Intensity Isometric Handgrip Exercise an Efficient Alternative in Lifestyle Blood Pressure Management? A Systematic Review.

Sports Health 2020 Sep/Oct;12(5):470-477. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

UIRFIDE (Sport Performance and Physical Fitness Research Group), Department of Physical and Sports Education, Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Valencia, Spain.

Context: High blood pressure is one of the leading preventable causes of cardiovascular death worldwide. In this regard, several studies have shown interest in the benefits of isometric exercise on blood pressure regulation.

Objective: To assess whether low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise (LI-IHE) is an effective strategy to lower blood pressure levels in prehypertensive and hypertensive patients.

Data Source: This study was conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement and registered with PROSPERO. Potentially eligible studies were identified after a systematic search conducted on 4 international databases: PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PEDro, and SPORTDiscus.

Study Selection: We included randomized controlled trials that comprised patients who received LI-IHE.

Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis.

Level Of Evidence: Level 3.

Data Extraction: Data related to patient characteristics, exercise programs, risk-of-bias assessment, and outcomes of interest were systematically reviewed independently by 2 authors.

Results: The following reductions (mean differences) were observed after LI-IHE: systolic blood pressure (SBP), (MD) = -5.43 mm Hg; (95% CI, -8.47 to -2.39; = 0.0005); diastolic blood pressure (DBP), -2.41 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.33 to -0.48; = 0.01); mean arterial pressure (MAP), -1.28 mm Hg (95% CI, -2.99 to 0.44; = 0.14).

Conclusion: LI-IHE seems to lower SBP, DBP, and MAP values in prehypertensive and hypertensive adults. It appears that LI-IHE reduces, in greater magnitude, blood pressure levels in hypertensive patients, specifically in patients aged <45 years, those who are overweight, and those on medications. Nevertheless, substantial heterogeneity in the main results and in the analyses by subgroups generated uncertainty about the real reduction magnitude that LI-IHE can produce on blood pressure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1941738120943882DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7485025PMC
October 2020

Different Time Course of Recovery in Achilles Tendon Thickness After Low-Load Resistance Training With and Without Blood Flow Restriction.

J Sport Rehabil 2020 Jul 27:1-6. Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Context: Blood flow restriction research has focused on muscular strength and hypertrophy. Limited data have been reported about the blood flow restriction effect on the tendon.

Objective: To analyze and compare the time course of recovery in Achilles tendon thickness after a single bout of low-intensity resistance training (LI-RT) and low-intensity blood flow restriction training (LI-BFRT).

Methods: A total of 56 healthy participants (24.60 [4.0] y; 23.65 [3.4] body mass index) were included. The dominant leg was assigned for LI-BFRT using low load (30% 1-repetition maximum) and 30% of the total occlusion pressure (52.21 [17.89] mm Hg) in plantar-flexion exercise (1 × 30 + 3 × 15 repetitions). The nondominant leg was assumed as a control condition.

Main Outcome Measure: Sonography images were taken before the intervention, immediately posttraining, and 24 hours after exercise (post-24) for the Achilles tendon thickness.

Results: Changes in Achilles tendon thickness for LI-BFRT group were significant post- (-14.5%; P < .05) and post-24 (-9.2%; P < .05). In contrast, LI-RT group showed a transient decrease after exercise (-9.67%; P < .05) followed by a recovery of thickness post-24 (-1.06%; P < .05). Thickness post-24 was different between LI-BFRT versus LI-RT (P < .01). Hedge effect size analysis showed a large effect (g = 0.90) in LI-BFRT pre-post condition and a medium effect (g = 0.57) in post- to post-24. The LI-RT obtained a medium effect (g = 0.53) in pre-post condition and a small effect (g = 0.49) in post- to post-24.

Conclusions: This study showed a different time course of the acute response in Achilles tendon thickness between LI-BFRT and LI-RT. This may be associated with intratendinous fluid movement in response to LI-BFRT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2019-0403DOI Listing
July 2020

Effect of Isometric Resistance Training on Blood Pressure Values in a Group of Normotensive Participants: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Sports Health 2020 May/Jun;12(3):256-262. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain.

Context: Cardiovascular diseases cause 17 million deaths annually worldwide, of which hypertension is responsible for 9.4 million and a 7% burden of disease. High blood pressure is responsible for 45% of deaths from heart disease and 51% of deaths from stroke.

Objective: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to quantify the effect of isometric resistance training on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and MAP, respectively) values in normotensive adult participants.

Data Sources: This study was registered with the PROSPERO database. Eligible studies were identified after performing a systematic search within the following databases: PubMed, Scielo, BioMed Central, Clinical Trials, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EBSCO.

Study Selection: Randomized controlled trials that categorized participants as normotensive according to the guidelines of the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology were included.

Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis.

Level Of Evidence: Level 1.

Data Extraction: Data related to participant characteristics, exercise programs, level of evidence, risk of bias, Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template, and outcomes of interest were systematically reviewed independently by 2 authors.

Results: A total of 6 randomized controlled trials were included. The following reductions in blood pressure (compared with the control group) were generated by isometric resistance training: SBP (mean difference [MD], -2.83 mm Hg; 95% CI, -3.95 to -1.72; < 0.00001), DBP (MD, -2.73; 95% CI, -4.23 to -1.24; = 0.0003), and MAP (MD, -3.07; 95% CI, -5.24 to -0.90; = 0.005).

Conclusion: It appears that isometric resistance training reduces SBP, DBP, and MAP in normotensive young adults in a statistically significant and clinically relevant manner. This type of exercise could be considered effective in preventing arterial hypertension.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1941738120908070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222669PMC
May 2020

Squat and Bench Press Force-Velocity Profiling in Male and Female Adolescent Rugby Players.

J Strength Cond Res 2021 Feb;35(Suppl 1):S44-S50

Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, Ewing Township, New Jersey.

Abstract: Alonso-Aubin, DA, Chulvi-Medrano, I, Cortell-Tormo, JM, Picón-Martínez, M, Rial-Rebullido, T, and Faigenbaum, AD. Squat and bench press force-velocity profiling in male and female adolescent rugby players. J Strength Cond Res 35(2S): S44-S50, 2021-Power development is critical for enhancing rugby performance because there is a close relationship between power and sport-specific skills. The aim of this study was to examine the force-velocity profiling generated by adolescent rugby players in the squat and bench press exercises and to compare sex-related differences. Subjects were 46 men (age: 14.48 ± 1.31 years; body height: 1.65 ± 0.09 m; and body mass: 58.07 ± 13.01 kg) and 41 women (age: 14.93 ± 2.76 years; body height: 1.63 ± 0.12 m; and body mass: 59.23 ± 12.66 kg) who were recruited from a national amateur rugby league team. Maximal strength, power, and velocity were assessed on the squat and bench press exercises using a Smith Machine and a linear power transducer with intensities ranging from 40 to 80% 1 repetition maximum (1RM) on the squat and 50-80% 1RM on the bench press. 1 repetition maximum squat and bench press performance were 104.26 ± 30.83 and 46.97 ± 13.59 kg, respectively, for men and 115.17 ± 41.42 and 45.85 ± 16.71 kg, respectively, for women. The maximum squat power results for men and women were 521.91 ± 298.75 and 591.26 ± 352.69 W, respectively, and the maximum bench press power results for men and women were 190.26 ± 150.54 and 326.16 ± 195.57 W, respectively. Significant sex-related differences (p < 0.001) were found on the squat exercise for maximum (40%), mean (40-50%), and time to maximum velocities (40-80%) as well as time to maximum power (80%). On the bench press exercise, significant sex-related differences (p < 0.001) were found for power and time to maximum velocity (40%-60%-70%-80%). These results may aid in the design of strength and conditioning programs for adolescent rugby players by targeting training prescriptions toward enhancing strength or velocity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003336DOI Listing
February 2021

Effect of a 1-year elastic band resistance exercise program on cardiovascular risk profile in postmenopausal women.

Menopause 2018 09;25(9):1004-1010

Department of Physiotherapy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 1-year progressive resistance training program using elastic bands on cardiovascular profile parameters in sedentary postmenopausal (>12 months' amenorrhea) women.

Methods: This longitudinal prospective experimental study included 38 menopausal women who were randomly divided into two groups: an intervention group (IG, n = 18), who completed a progressive resistance training program with elastic bands over the course of 12 months (six exercises for whole body training, three sets × 10 repetitions), and a control group (CG, n = 20) that did not perform any training. Blood analysis and body composition were determined at baseline and 1 year after intervention.

Results: After the 1-year training program, weight, waist circumference, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and C-reactive protein showed a decrease compared with baseline values in the IG, showing a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in cardiovascular profile. Very-low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides showed a nonsignificant (P > 0.05) improvement. The CG increased significantly in weight and waist circumference, whereas the rest of the variables remained unchanged.

Conclusion: One year of progressive resistance training with elastic bands has beneficial effects on anti-inflammatory and anthropometric cardiovascular risk factors in menopausal women, including changes in lipid profile.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0000000000001113DOI Listing
September 2018

Manual Resistance versus Conventional Resistance Training: Impact on Strength and Muscular Endurance in Recreationally Trained Men.

J Sports Sci Med 2017 Sep 8;16(3):343-349. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Department of Kinesiology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA.

Manual resistance training (MRT) has been widely used in the field of physical therapy. It has also been used as a strength training method due to the accommodating resistance nature of this modality. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of an 8-week MRT program on maximum strength and muscular endurance in comparison to conventional resistance training in recreationally trained men. Twenty healthy recreationally trained male subjects were recruited and divided into a MRT training group and a conventional training (CT) group. CT group performed bench press and lat pull-down exercises, and the MRT group performed similar movements with resistance provided by a personal trainer. Both groups completed similar training protocol and training load: 2 training sessions weekly for 3 sets of 8 repetitions at an intensity of 8 to 10 on the perceived exertion scale of 0-10. Initial maximum strength differences were not significant between the groups. Neither group showed significant changes in muscular strength or endurance. Despite the statistically non-significant pre- to post differences, a trend for improvement was observed and effect size (ES) calculations indicated greater magnitude of effects for strength and endurance changes in the MRT group in lat pulldown (g=0.84) compared to CT group. Effectiveness of MRT is similar to CT for improving muscular strength and endurance. MRT can be used as a supplemental or alternative strength training modality for recreationally trained subjects, or be considered by personal trainers especially in low equipped facility conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592285PMC
September 2017

Effects of functional resistance training on fitness and quality of life in females with chronic nonspecific low-back pain.

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil 2018 Feb;31(1):95-105

Faculty of Physical Education and Sports, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Background: Exercise is important as adjuvant in the chronic low back pain (CLBP) treatment. Functional training could involve benefits for low back pain (LBP) patients.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week period of functional resistance training on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), disability, body pain, and physical fitness in CLBP females.

Methods: Nineteen females CLBP were recruited according to Paris Task Force on Back Pain criteria. Participants were randomly assigned to an exercise group (EG); and a control group (CG). Subjects were tested at baseline and at week 12 after 24 sessions, 2 days per week. Body pain was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), disability with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and HRQOL with Short Form 36 questionnaire. Physical fitness was measured using: flamingo test, back endurance test, side bridge test, abdominal curl-up tests, and 60-s squat test.

Results: EG showed significant improvements in physical function (10%; p< 0.05), body pain (42%; p< 0.05), vitality (31%; p< 0.05), physical component scale (15%; p< 0.05), VAS (62.5%; p< 0.01), ODI (61.3%; p< 0.05), balance (58%; p< 0.05), curl-up (83%; p< 0.01), squat (22%; p< 0.01), static back (67%; p< 0.01), and side bridge (56%; p< 0.01).

Conclusion: Periodized functional resistance training decreased pain and disability and improved HRQOL, balance and physical fitness in females with CLBP, and can thus be used safely in this population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/BMR-169684DOI Listing
February 2018

Influence of Scapular Position on the Core Musculature Activation in the Prone Plank Exercise.

J Strength Cond Res 2017 Aug;31(8):2255-2262

1Area of Physical Education and Sports, Faculty of Education, University of Alicante, Alicante, Spain; 2Area of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Valencia, Spain; and 3Laboratory of Sport Biomechanics (GIBD), Department of Physical Activity and Sports, University of Valencia, Elche, Spain.

Cortell-Tormo, JM, García-Jaén, M, Chulvi-Medrano, I, Hernández-Sánchez, S, Lucas-Cuevas, ÁG, and Tortosa-Martínez, J. Influence of scapular position on the core musculature activation in the prone plank exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2255-2262, 2017-Prone plank is a widely used exercise in core stability training. Research has shown that pelvic tilt plays an important role on the electromyographic (EMG) activation of core musculature. However, the influence of scapular position on EMG activation is currently unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the influence of scapular position on the core muscles during a prone plank. Surface EMG of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and erector spinae (ES) was collected in 15 participants (10 men and 5 women). Four variations of the prone plank were evaluated: scapular abduction with anterior (ABANT) and posterior (ABRET) pelvic tilt; and scapular adduction with anterior (ADANT), and posterior (ADRET) pelvic tilt. Individual muscle EMG and overall EMG for each plank exercise was analyzed. Joint positions were controlled with a 2D kinematic analysis. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were also registered. The ADRET resulted in higher overall EMG activity compared with ABANT (p = 0.04) and ADANT (p = 0.04). Moreover, ADRET resulted in greater EMG activity compared with ADANT, ABANT, and ABRET for EO (p = 0.000; p = 0.000; p = 0.035), IO (p = 0.000; p = 0.000; p = 0.005), and ES (p = 0.019; p = 0.001; p = 0.014). Regarding RA, ADRET was significantly higher compared with ADANT (p = 0.002) and ABANT (p = 0.005). Finally, ADRET provoked a higher RPE compared with ABANT (p = 0.000), ABRET (p = 0.001), and ADANT (p = 0.015). These findings demonstrate the influence of the scapular and pelvic position on the EMG response of the core muscle groups analyzed in this study, and highlight the greater contribution of these muscles to the postural stabilizing demands during posterior pelvic tilt positions, particularly when the scapulae are in adduction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001689DOI Listing
August 2017

Effects of manual resistance training and free weight resistance training on postexercise blood pressure in hypertensive men: a pilot study.

J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 Oct 5;57(10):1367-1374. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

Department of Biosciences, Federal University of São Paulo, Campus Baixada Santista, Santos, Brazil.

Background: Manual resistance training (MRT) is a low cost and practically applicable alternative form of resistance training that is ideal for weight rooms with limited equipment. The aim of this study was to compare the acute and subacute hemodynamic responses between MRT and free weight resistance training (FWRT) in normotensive (NT) and hypertensive (HT) men.

Methods: Twenty-six untrained men performed a single bout of MRT and FWRT with a minimum 72-hour rest in between. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean blood pressure (MBP) were measured, and double product (DP) was calculated. Variables were assessed at different time points: SBP, DBP and MBP (pre- and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes postexercise); DP (half-time and postintervention).

Results: The blood pressure values (BP) were greater in HT men in all analyses and interventions. BP responses were similar between MRT and FWRT in both groups of men. In HT men, there was postexercise hypotension (PEH) after 15, 30 and 60 minutes in MBP measured for both interventions. The DP was greater for the MRT intervention, but within the cardiovascular safety limits.

Conclusions: MRT induces PEH in similar levels to FWRT in HT men. Therefore, MRT is a viable and safe alternative for application of FWRT in NT and HT men, reducing the need for expensive equipment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06497-5DOI Listing
October 2017

Resistance Training with Blood Flow Restriction and Hypertensive Subjects.

J Hum Kinet 2015 Jun 10;46:7-8. Epub 2015 Jul 10.

Sport Sciences, CSCS, NSCA-CPT; Benestar Wellness Center Research.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/hukin-2015-0028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4519199PMC
June 2015

Comparison of the effects of an eight-week push-up program using stable versus unstable surfaces.

Int J Sports Phys Ther 2012 Dec;7(6):586-94

NowYou Personal Training Studio, Valencia, Spain.

Background And Purpose: Recently, the trend among physical training and rehabilitation professionals is the use of resistance exercise on unstable equipment in order to increase the effort of the agonist and stabilizing muscles. It is unknown if performing exercises on unstable surfaces provides a greater training stimulus as compared to training on a stable training surface. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to compare the effect that push-up training on stable and unstable surfaces had on strength performance in healthy young men.

Methods: Thirty subjects with experience in resistance training participated in push-up training two days per week for eight weeks on one of three different surfaces: the floor (Tp), the T-Bow® (TBp) or the BOSU® (Bp).

Results: Strength, as measured by one repetition maximum (1-RM) and muscle endurance, as measured by number of pushups performed did not improve significantly (p>0.05) for any of the intervention groups.

Conclusions: The addition of unstable surfaces in push-up training does not provide greater improvement in muscular strength and endurance than push up training performed on a stable surface in young men.

Levels Of Evidence: 3b.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3537455PMC
December 2012

The progression of paraspinal muscle recruitment intensity in localized and global strength training exercises is not based on instability alone.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011 Nov;92(11):1875-83

Laboratory of Physical Activity and Health, University of Valencia, Spain.

Objective: To evaluate electromyographic activity of several paraspinal muscles during localized stabilizing exercises and multijoint or global stabilizing exercises.

Design: Cross-sectional counterbalanced repeated measures.

Setting: Research laboratory.

Participants: Volunteers (N=25) without low-back pain.

Intervention: Subjects performed (1) localized stabilizing exercises (callisthenic exercises with only body weight as resistance): static lumbar extension, stable (on floor) and unstable static unipedal forward flexion, stable dynamic unipedal forward flexion, and unstable supine bridge; and (2) global stabilizing exercises (70% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]): dead lift and lunge.

Main Outcome Measures: Mean and maximum amplitude of the electromyographic RMS of the lumbar and thoracic multifidus spinae and erector spinae. Electromyographic signals were normalized to the MVIC achieved during a back-extension exercise.

Results: Normalizing to the MVIC, paraspinal muscles were significantly (P<.05) most active, with mean and peak amplitudes of 88.1% and 113.4% during the dynamic stable dead lift at 70% of MVIC, respectively. The supine bridge on the unstable surface obtained the significantly lowest values of 29.03% and 30.3%, respectively. The other exercises showed intermediate values that ranged from 35.4% to 61.6%.

Conclusion: Findings from this study may be helpful to strength trainers and physical therapists in their choice of exercises for strengthening paraspinal muscles. Our results suggest that in asymptomatic young experienced subjects, the dead lift at 70% of MVIC provides higher levels of mean and peak electromyographic signals than localized stabilizing exercises and other types of global stabilizing exercises.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.05.015DOI Listing
November 2011

Deadlift muscle force and activation under stable and unstable conditions.

J Strength Cond Res 2010 Oct;24(10):2723-30

Department of Physical Education and Sports, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

The objective of this study was to compare the production of force and paraspinal muscle activity between deadlifts carried out in a standard way and with different instability devices (Bosu and T-Bow). Deadlifts involve the performance of muscle activities with dynamic and isometric characteristics. Thirty-one subjects participated voluntarily in the study. Initially, they performed an isometric test for 5 seconds in each condition. After that, they performed a set of 5 repetitions with 70% of the maximum isometric force obtained in each one of the previously evaluated conditions. During the isometric tests, records of electromyographic activity and force production were obtained, whereas during the dynamic tests, only the electromyographic activity was registered. The subjects produced more force and muscle activity on the stable surface than under the other conditions during the isometric test (p < 0.05), and the same differences in muscle activity were observed during the dynamic test (p < 0.05). These data show that the performance of deadlifts under stable conditions favors a higher production of maximum strength and muscle activity. Therefore, we conclude that the use of instability devices in deadlift training does not increase performance, nor does it provide greater activation of the paraspinal muscles, leading us to question their value in the performance of other types of exercises.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181f0a8b9DOI Listing
October 2010

A lower-limb training program to improve balance in healthy elderly women using the T-bow device.

Phys Sportsmed 2009 Jun;37(2):127-35

Department of Physical Education and Sports, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Ageing impairs balance, which increases the risk of falls. Fall-related injuries are a serious health problem associated with dependency and disability in the elderly and results in high costs to public health systems. This study aims to determine the effects of a training program to develop balance using a new device called the T-Bow. A total of 28 women > 65 years were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) (n = 18; 69.50 [0.99] years), or a control group (CG) (n = 10; 70.70 [2.18] years). A program for lower limbs was applied for 8 weeks using 5 exercises on the T-Bow: squat, lateral and frontal swings, lunges, and plantarflexions. The intensity of the exercises was controlled by time of exposure, support base, and ratings of perceived exertion. Clinical tests were used to evaluate variables of balance. Static balance was measured by a 1-leg balance test (unipedal stance test), dynamic balance was measured by the 8-foot-up-and-go test, and overall balance was measured using the Tinetti test. Results for the EG showed an increase of 35.2% in static balance (P < 0.005), 12.7% in dynamic balance (P < 0.005), and 5.9% in overall balance (P > 0.05). Results for the CG showed a decline of 5.79% in static balance (P > 0.05) but no change in the other balance variables. Thus the data suggest that implementing a training program using the T-Bow could improve balance in healthy older women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2009.06.1719DOI Listing
June 2009
-->