Publications by authors named "Ismaeel Muhamed"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Synthesis of sonicated fibrin nanoparticles that modulate fibrin clot polymerization and enhance angiogenic responses.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2021 Apr 29;204:111805. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, NC State University and UNC Chapel-Hill, Raleigh, NC, United States; Comparative Medicine Institute, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, United States. Electronic address:

Chronic wounds can occur when the healing process is disrupted and the wound remains in a prolonged inflammatory stage that leads to severe tissue damage and poor healing outcomes. Clinically used treatments, such as high density, FDA-approved fibrin sealants, do not provide an optimal environment for native cell proliferation and subsequent tissue regeneration. Therefore, new treatments outside the confines of these conventional fibrin bulk gel therapies are required. We have previously developed flowable, low-density fibrin nanoparticles that, when coupled to keratinocyte growth factor, promote cell migration and epithelial wound closure in vivo. Here, we report a new high throughput method for generating the fibrin nanoparticles using probe sonication, which is less time intensive than the previously reported microfluidic method, and investigate the ability of the sonicated fibrin nanoparticles (SFBN) to promote clot formation and cell migration in vitro. The SFBNs can form a fibrin gel when combined with fibrinogen in the absence of exogenous thrombin, and the polymerization rate and fiber density in these fibrin clots is tunable based on SFBN concentration. Furthermore, fibrin gels made with SFBNs support cell migration in an in vitro angiogenic sprouting assay, which is relevant for wound healing. In this report, we show that SFBNs may be a promising wound healing therapy that can be easily produced and delivered in a flowable formulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2021.111805DOI Listing
April 2021

Fibrin Nanoparticles Coupled with Keratinocyte Growth Factor Enhance the Dermal Wound-Healing Rate.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2019 Jan 15;11(4):3771-3780. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering , North Carolina State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Raleigh 27695 , North Carolina , United States.

Expediting the wound-healing process is critical for patients chronically ill from nonhealing wounds and diseases such as hemophilia or diabetes or who have suffered trauma including easily infected open wounds. FDA-approved external tissue sealants include the topical application of fibrin gels, which can be 500 times denser than natural fibrin clots. With lower clot porosity and higher polymerization rates than physiologically formed fibrin clots, the commercial gels quickly stop blood loss but impede the later clot degradation kinetics and thus retard tissue-healing rates. The fibrin nanoparticles (FBNs) described here are constructed from physiologically relevant fibrin concentrations that support new tissue and dermal wound scaffold formation when coupled with growth factors. The FBNs, synthesized in a microfluidic droplet generator, support cell adhesion and traction generation, and when coupled to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), support cell migration and in vivo wound healing. The FBN-KGF particles enhance cell migration in vitro greater than FBN alone or free KGF and also improve healing outcomes in a murine full thickness injury model compared to saline, bulk fibrin sealant, free KGF, or bulk fibrin mixed with KGF treatments. Furthermore, FBN can be potentially administered with other tissue-healing factors and inflammatory mediators to improve wound-healing outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b21056DOI Listing
January 2019

Endothelial Microparticles and Systemic Complement Activation in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

J Am Heart Assoc 2018 07 13;7(14). Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO.

Background: Endothelial microparticles are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and complement activation. We hypothesized that the complement pathway is activated in patients with CKD via endothelial microparticles and that complement activation correlates with endothelial dysfunction in CKD.

Methods And Results: We analyzed complement data of 30 healthy subjects, 30 patients with stage III/IV CKD, and 30 renal transplant recipients with stage III/IV CKD, evaluating the potential correlation of complement fragments with brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Endothelial microparticles were characterized via proteomic analysis and compared between study groups. Complement fragment Ba was significantly increased in CKD and post-kidney transplant CKD. Plasma Ba levels correlated significantly with lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, lower Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration glomerular filtration rate, and higher urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Factor D levels were significantly higher in the plasma microparticles of patients with CKD versus healthy controls. Plasma microparticles isolated from patients with CKD and containing factor D activated the alternative pathway in vitro.

Conclusion: The alternative complement pathway is activated in CKD and correlates with endothelial dysfunction and markers of CKD. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether endothelial microparticles with increased factor D play a pathologic role in CKD-associated vascular disease.

Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02230202.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.117.007818DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6064828PMC
July 2018

Biophysical Tools to Study Cellular Mechanotransduction.

Bioengineering (Basel) 2017 Feb 7;4(1). Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA.

The cell membrane is the interface that volumetrically isolates cellular components from the cell's environment. Proteins embedded within and on the membrane have varied biological functions: reception of external biochemical signals, as membrane channels, amplification and regulation of chemical signals through secondary messenger molecules, controlled exocytosis, endocytosis, phagocytosis, organized recruitment and sequestration of cytosolic complex proteins, cell division processes, organization of the cytoskeleton and more. The membrane's bioelectrical role is enabled by the physiologically controlled release and accumulation of electrochemical potential modulating molecules across the membrane through specialized ion channels (e.g., Na⁺, Ca, K⁺ channels). The membrane's biomechanical functions include sensing external forces and/or the rigidity of the external environment through force transmission, specific conformational changes and/or signaling through mechanoreceptors (e.g., platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, epithelial (E)-cadherin, integrin) embedded in the membrane. Certain mechanical stimulations through specific receptor complexes induce electrical and/or chemical impulses in cells and propagate across cells and tissues. These biomechanical sensory and biochemical responses have profound implications in normal physiology and disease. Here, we discuss the tools that facilitate the understanding of mechanosensitive adhesion receptors. This article is structured to provide a broad biochemical and mechanobiology background to introduce a freshman mechano-biologist to the field of mechanotransduction, with deeper study enabled by many of the references cited herein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering4010012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5590431PMC
February 2017

E-cadherin-mediated force transduction signals regulate global cell mechanics.

J Cell Sci 2016 05 10;129(9):1843-54. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Carl W. Woese Institute of Genomic Biology, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

This report elucidates an E-cadherin-based force-transduction pathway that triggers changes in cell mechanics through a mechanism requiring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the downstream formation of new integrin adhesions. This mechanism operates in addition to local cytoskeletal remodeling triggered by conformational changes in the E-cadherin-associated protein α-catenin, at sites of mechanical perturbation. Studies using magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC), together with traction force microscopy (TFM) and confocal imaging identified force-activated E-cadherin-specific signals that integrate cadherin force transduction, integrin activation and cell contractility. EGFR is required for the downstream activation of PI3K and myosin-II-dependent cell stiffening. Our findings also demonstrated that α-catenin-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling at perturbed E-cadherin adhesions does not require cell stiffening. These results broaden the repertoire of E-cadherin-based force transduction mechanisms, and define the force-sensitive signaling network underlying the mechano-chemical integration of spatially segregated adhesion receptors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.185447DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4893802PMC
May 2016

Dynamic visualization of α-catenin reveals rapid, reversible conformation switching between tension states.

Curr Biol 2015 Jan 24;25(2):218-224. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Bioengineering and Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Integrative and Molecular Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Bioengineering and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address:

The cytosolic protein α-catenin is a postulated force transducer at cadherin complexes. The demonstration of force activation, identification of consequent downstream events in live cells, and development of tools to study these dynamic processes in living cells are central to elucidating the role of α-catenin in cellular mechanics and tissue function. Here we demonstrate that α-catenin is a force-activatable mechanotransducer at cell-cell junctions by using an engineered α-catenin conformation sensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This sensor reconstitutes α-catenin-dependent functions in α-catenin-depleted cells and recapitulates the behavior of the endogenous protein. Dynamic imaging of cells expressing the sensor demonstrated that α-catenin undergoes immediate, reversible conformation switching in direct response to different mechanical perturbations of cadherin adhesions. Combined magnetic twisting cytometry with dynamic FRET imaging revealed rapid, local conformation switching upon the mechanical stimulation of specific cadherin bonds. At acutely stretched cell-cell junctions, the immediate, reversible conformation change further reveals that α-catenin behaves like an elastic spring in series with cadherin and actin. The force-dependent recruitment of vinculin—a principal α-catenin effector—to junctions requires the vinculin binding site of the α-catenin sensor. In cells, the relative rates of force-dependent α-catenin conformation switching and vinculin recruitment reveal that α-catenin activation and vinculin recruitment occur sequentially, rather than in a concerted process, with vinculin accumulation being significantly slower. This engineered α-catenin sensor revealed that α-catenin is a reversible, stretch-activatable sensor that mechanically links cadherin complexes and actin and is an indispensable player in cadherin-specific mechanotransduction at intercellular junctions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.11.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302114PMC
January 2015

α-catenin cytomechanics--role in cadherin-dependent adhesion and mechanotransduction.

J Cell Sci 2014 Apr 12;127(Pt 8):1779-91. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801-3709, USA.

The findings presented here demonstrate the role of α-catenin in cadherin-based adhesion and mechanotransduction in different mechanical contexts. Bead-twisting measurements in conjunction with imaging, and the use of different cell lines and α-catenin mutants reveal that the acute local mechanical manipulation of cadherin bonds triggers vinculin and actin recruitment to cadherin adhesions in an actin- and α-catenin-dependent manner. The modest effect of α-catenin on the two-dimensional binding affinities of cell surface cadherins further suggests that force-activated adhesion strengthening is due to enhanced cadherin-cytoskeletal interactions rather than to α-catenin-dependent affinity modulation. Complementary investigations of cadherin-based rigidity sensing also suggest that, although α-catenin alters traction force generation, it is not the sole regulator of cell contractility on compliant cadherin-coated substrata.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.139014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3986676PMC
April 2014

Expression, purification, and characterization of soluble K-Ras4B for structural analysis.

Protein Expr Purif 2010 Oct 8;73(2):125-31. Epub 2010 Jun 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607, United States.

A p21 GTPase K-Ras4B plays an important role in human cancer and represents an excellent target for cancer therapeutics. Currently, there are no drugs directly targeting K-Ras4B. In part, this is due to the lack of structural information describing unique features of K-Ras4B. Here we describe a methodology allowing production of soluble, well-folded K-Ras4B for structural analysis. The key points in K-Ras4B preparation are low temperature expression and extraction of K-Ras4B from the insoluble fraction using a nucleotide loading procedure in the presence of Mg(2+) and citrate, a low affinity chelator. Additionally, a significant amount of K-Ras4B could be extracted from the soluble fraction. We show that recombinant K-Ras4B is monomeric in solution. Excellent NMR signal dispersion suggests that the protein is well-folded and is amenable to solution structure determination. In addition, using phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs we show that recombinant K-Ras4B interacts with lipids and that this interaction is mediated by the C-terminal hypervariable region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2010.05.015DOI Listing
October 2010