Publications by authors named "Ismaïl Moukadiri"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bacillus subtilis exhibits MnmC-like tRNA modification activities.

RNA Biol 2018 24;15(9):1167-1173. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

a Laboratory of RNA Modification and Mitochondrial Diseases , Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe , Valencia , Spain.

The MnmE-MnmG complex of Escherichia coli uses either ammonium or glycine as a substrate to incorporate the 5-aminomethyl or 5-carboxymethylaminomethyl group into the wobble uridine of certain tRNAs. Both modifications can be converted into a 5-methylaminomethyl group by the independent oxidoreductase and methyltransferase activities of MnmC, which respectively reside in the MnmC(o) and MnmC(m) domains of this bifunctional enzyme. MnmE and MnmG, but not MnmC, are evolutionarily conserved. Bacillus subtilis lacks genes encoding MnmC(o) and/or MnmC(m) homologs. The glycine pathway has been considered predominant in this typical gram-positive species because only the 5-carboxymethylaminomethyl group has been detected in tRNA and bulk tRNA to date. Here, we show that the 5-methylaminomethyl modification is prevalent in B. subtilis tRNA and tRNA. Our data indicate that B. subtilis has evolved MnmC(o)- and MnmC(m)-like activities that reside in non MnmC homologous protein(s), which suggests that both activities provide some sort of biological advantage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15476286.2018.1517012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284559PMC
December 2018

Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

PLoS Genet 2017 Jul 21;13(7):e1006921. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

Modificación del RNA y Enfermedades Mitocondriales, Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Valencia, Spain.

Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype, which must be taken into consideration in exploring specific therapeutic interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5544249PMC
July 2017

Modification of the wobble uridine in bacterial and mitochondrial tRNAs reading NNA/NNG triplets of 2-codon boxes.

RNA Biol 2014 ;11(12):1495-507

a Laboratory of RNA Modification and Mitochondrial Diseases ; Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe ; Valencia , Spain.

Posttranscriptional modification of the uridine located at the wobble position (U34) of tRNAs is crucial for optimization of translation. Defects in the U34 modification of mitochondrial-tRNAs are associated with a group of rare diseases collectively characterized by the impairment of the oxidative phosphorylation system. Retrograde signaling pathways from mitochondria to nucleus are involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases. These pathways may be triggered by not only the disturbance of the mitochondrial (mt) translation caused by hypomodification of tRNAs, but also as a result of nonconventional roles of mt-tRNAs and mt-tRNA-modifying enzymes. The evolutionary conservation of these enzymes supports their importance for cell and organismal functions. Interestingly, bacterial and eukaryotic cells respond to stress by altering the expression or activity of these tRNA-modifying enzymes, which leads to changes in the modification status of tRNAs. This review summarizes recent findings about these enzymes and sets them within the previous data context.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/15476286.2014.992269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4615368PMC
October 2015

The output of the tRNA modification pathways controlled by the Escherichia coli MnmEG and MnmC enzymes depends on the growth conditions and the tRNA species.

Nucleic Acids Res 2014 Feb 30;42(4):2602-23. Epub 2013 Nov 30.

Laboratory of RNA Modification and Mitochondrial Diseases, Príncipe Felipe Research Center, 46012-Valencia, Spain, Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University, S90187, Sweden and Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Rare Diseases (CIBERER) (node U721), Spain.

In Escherichia coli, the MnmEG complex modifies transfer RNAs (tRNAs) decoding NNA/NNG codons. MnmEG catalyzes two different modification reactions, which add an aminomethyl (nm) or carboxymethylaminomethyl (cmnm) group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine using ammonium or glycine, respectively. In tRNA(cmnm5s2UUG)(Gln) and tRNA(cmnm5UmAA)(Leu), however, cmnm(5) appears as the final modification, whereas in the remaining tRNAs, the MnmEG products are converted into 5-methylaminomethyl (mnm(5)) through the two-domain, bi-functional enzyme MnmC. MnmC(o) transforms cmnm(5) into nm(5), whereas MnmC(m) converts nm(5) into mnm(5), thus producing an atypical network of modification pathways. We investigate the activities and tRNA specificity of MnmEG and the MnmC domains, the ability of tRNAs to follow the ammonium or glycine pathway and the effect of mnmC mutations on growth. We demonstrate that the two MnmC domains function independently of each other and that tRNA(cmnm5s2UUG)(Gln) and tRNA(cmnm5UmAA)(Leu), are substrates for MnmC(m), but not MnmC(o). Synthesis of mnm(5)s(2)U by MnmEG-MnmC in vivo avoids build-up of intermediates in tRNA(mnm5s2UUU)(Lys). We also show that MnmEG can modify all the tRNAs via the ammonium pathway. Strikingly, the net output of the MnmEG pathways in vivo depends on growth conditions and tRNA species. Loss of any MnmC activity has a biological cost under specific conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkt1228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3936742PMC
February 2014

Construction of an expression vector for production and purification of human somatostatin in Escherichia coli.

Mol Biotechnol 2013 Oct;55(2):150-8

Departament de Microbiologia i Ecologia, Universitat de València, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100, Burjassot, Spain,

Somatostatin/growth hormone-inhibiting hormone is the peptide that inhibits secretion of somatotropin/growth hormone. Solid-phase synthesis methods are being currently used to produce somatostatin. Recombinant peptide synthesis is widely described for the production of small proteins and peptides; however, the production at industrial scale of peptides for biopharmaceutical applications is limited for economic reasons. Here, we propose the use of a new pGB-SMT plasmid to produce Somatostatin, as a C-terminal fusion protein with a Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidase fragment. To facilitate removal of that fragment by CNBr cleavage, a methionine residue was introduced at the N-terminal of the hormone peptide. The use of this construction enables an IPTG-free expression system. The suitability of this procedure has been assessed in a 15 l scale-up experiment yielding almost 300 mg, with purity >99 % and it is being implemented for commercial scale. The plasmid pGB-SMT here described is an alternative option for a cheap and high expression of other short peptide hormones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12033-013-9667-3DOI Listing
October 2013

Enzymology of tRNA modification in the bacterial MnmEG pathway.

Biochimie 2012 Jul 28;94(7):1510-20. Epub 2012 Feb 28.

Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Molecular Genetics, Avenida Autopista del Saler, 16-3, 46012-Valencia, Spain.

Among all RNAs, tRNA exhibits the largest number and the widest variety of post-transcriptional modifications. Modifications within the anticodon stem loop, mainly at the wobble position and purine-37, collectively contribute to stabilize the codon-anticodon pairing, maintain the translational reading frame, facilitate the engagement of the ribosomal decoding site and enable translocation of tRNA from the A-site to the P-site of the ribosome. Modifications at the wobble uridine (U34) of tRNAs reading two degenerate codons ending in purine are complex and result from the activity of two multi-enzyme pathways, the IscS-MnmA and MnmEG pathways, which independently work on positions 2 and 5 of the U34 pyrimidine ring, respectively, and from a third pathway, controlled by TrmL (YibK), that modifies the 2'-hydroxyl group of the ribose. MnmEG is the only common pathway to all the mentioned tRNAs, and involves the GTP- and FAD-dependent activity of the MnmEG complex and, in some cases, the activity of the bifunctional enzyme MnmC. The Escherichia coli MnmEG complex catalyzes the incorporation of an aminomethyl group into the C5 atom of U34 using methylene-tetrahydrofolate and glycine or ammonium as donors. The reaction requires GTP hydrolysis, probably to assemble the active site of the enzyme or to carry out substrate recognition. Inactivation of the evolutionarily conserved MnmEG pathway produces a pleiotropic phenotype in bacteria and mitochondrial dysfunction in human cell lines. While the IscS-MnmA pathway and the MnmA-mediated thiouridylation reaction are relatively well understood, we have limited information on the reactions mediated by the MnmEG, MnmC and TrmL enzymes and on the precise role of proteins MnmE and MnmG in the MnmEG complex activity. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge on these pathways and what we still need to know, with special emphasis on the MnmEG pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biochi.2012.02.019DOI Listing
July 2012

Structural basis for Fe-S cluster assembly and tRNA thiolation mediated by IscS protein-protein interactions.

PLoS Biol 2010 Apr 13;8(4):e1000354. Epub 2010 Apr 13.

Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

The cysteine desulfurase IscS is a highly conserved master enzyme initiating sulfur transfer via persulfide to a range of acceptor proteins involved in Fe-S cluster assembly, tRNA modifications, and sulfur-containing cofactor biosynthesis. Several IscS-interacting partners including IscU, a scaffold for Fe-S cluster assembly; TusA, the first member of a sulfur relay leading to sulfur incorporation into the wobble uridine of several tRNAs; ThiI, involved in tRNA modification and thiamine biosynthesis; and rhodanese RhdA are sulfur acceptors. Other proteins, such as CyaY/frataxin and IscX, also bind to IscS, but their functional roles are not directly related to sulfur transfer. We have determined the crystal structures of IscS-IscU and IscS-TusA complexes providing the first insight into their different modes of binding and the mechanism of sulfur transfer. Exhaustive mutational analysis of the IscS surface allowed us to map the binding sites of various partner proteins and to determine the functional and biochemical role of selected IscS and TusA residues. IscS interacts with its partners through an extensive surface area centered on the active site Cys328. The structures indicate that the acceptor proteins approach Cys328 from different directions and suggest that the conformational plasticity of a long loop containing this cysteine is essential for the ability of IscS to transfer sulfur to multiple acceptor proteins. The sulfur acceptors can only bind to IscS one at a time, while frataxin and IscX can form a ternary complex with IscU and IscS. Our data support the role of frataxin as an iron donor for IscU to form the Fe-S clusters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1000354DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854127PMC
April 2010

Structure-function analysis of Escherichia coli MnmG (GidA), a highly conserved tRNA-modifying enzyme.

J Bacteriol 2009 Dec 2;191(24):7614-9. Epub 2009 Oct 2.

Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The MnmE-MnmG complex is involved in tRNA modification. We have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli MnmG at 2.4-A resolution, mutated highly conserved residues with putative roles in flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) or tRNA binding and MnmE interaction, and analyzed the effects of these mutations in vivo and in vitro. Limited trypsinolysis of MnmG suggests significant conformational changes upon FAD binding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00650-09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2786596PMC
December 2009

Evolutionarily conserved proteins MnmE and GidA catalyze the formation of two methyluridine derivatives at tRNA wobble positions.

Nucleic Acids Res 2009 Nov;37(21):7177-93

Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, 46012-Valencia, Spain.

The wobble uridine of certain bacterial and mitochondrial tRNAs is modified, at position 5, through an unknown reaction pathway that utilizes the evolutionarily conserved MnmE and GidA proteins. The resulting modification (a methyluridine derivative) plays a critical role in decoding NNG/A codons and reading frame maintenance during mRNA translation. The lack of this tRNA modification produces a pleiotropic phenotype in bacteria and has been associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathies in humans. In this work, we use in vitro and in vivo approaches to characterize the enzymatic pathway controlled by the Escherichia coli MnmE*GidA complex. Surprisingly, this complex catalyzes two different GTP- and FAD-dependent reactions, which produce 5-aminomethyluridine and 5-carboxymethylamino-methyluridine using ammonium and glycine, respectively, as substrates. In both reactions, methylene-tetrahydrofolate is the most probable source to form the C5-methylene moiety, whereas NADH is dispensable in vitro unless FAD levels are limiting. Our results allow us to reformulate the bacterial MnmE*GidA dependent pathway and propose a novel mechanism for the modification reactions performed by the MnmE and GidA family proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp762DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790889PMC
November 2009

Further insights into the tRNA modification process controlled by proteins MnmE and GidA of Escherichia coli.

Nucleic Acids Res 2006 24;34(20):5892-905. Epub 2006 Oct 24.

Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler 16-3, 46013 Valencia, Spain.

In Escherichia coli, proteins GidA and MnmE are involved in the addition of the carboxymethylaminomethyl (cmnm) group onto uridine 34 (U34) of tRNAs decoding two-family box triplets. However, their precise role in the modification reaction remains undetermined. Here, we show that GidA is an FAD-binding protein and that mutagenesis of the N-terminal dinucleotide-binding motif of GidA, impairs capability of this protein to bind FAD and modify tRNA, resulting in defective cell growth. Thus, GidA may catalyse an FAD-dependent reaction that is required for production of cmnmU34. We also show that GidA and MnmE have identical cell location and that both proteins physically interact. Gel filtration and native PAGE experiments indicate that GidA, like MnmE, dimerizes and that GidA and MnmE directly assemble in an alpha2beta2 heterotetrameric complex. Interestingly, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis shows that identical levels of the same undermodified form of U34 are present in tRNA hydrolysates from loss-of-function gidA and mnmE mutants. Moreover, these mutants exhibit similar phenotypic traits. Altogether, these results do not support previous proposals that activity of MnmE precedes that of GidA; rather, our data suggest that MnmE and GidA form a functional complex in which both proteins are interdependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkl752DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1635325PMC
December 2006

Characterization of a disulphide-bound Pir-cell wall protein (Pir-CWP) of Yarrowia lipolytica.

Yeast 2003 Apr;20(5):417-26

Unidad de Microbiología, Fac Farmacia, Universidad Valencia, Avda Vicente Andrés Estelles s/n, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia, Spain.

In this work we have studied the disulphide-bound group of cell wall mannoproteins of Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida albicans. In the case of Y. lipolytica, SDS-PAGE analysis of the beta-mercaptoethanol-extracted material from the purified cell walls of the yeast form, showed the presence of a main polypeptide of 45 kDa and some minor bands in the 100-200 kDa range. This pattern of bands is similar to that obtained in identical extracts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Moukadiri et al., 1999), and besides, all these bands cross-react with an antibody raised against beta-mercaptoethanol-extracted material from the purified cell walls of S. cerevisiae, suggesting that the 45 kDa band could be the homologue of Pir4 of S. cerevisiae in Y. lipolytica. To confirm this possibility, the amino-terminal sequences of two internal regions of the 45 kDa protein were determined, and degenerate oligonucleotides were used to clone the gene. The gene isolated in this way codes a 286 amino acid polypeptide that shows homology with the Pir family of proteins of S. cerevisiae (Russo et al., 1992; Toh-e et al., 1993), accordingly we have named this gene YlPIR1. Disruption of YlPIR1 led to a slight increase in the resistance of the cells to calcofluor white, Congo red and zymolyase, but did not cause changes in cell morphology, growth rate or morphological transition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/yea.973DOI Listing
April 2003
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