Publications by authors named "Isaure Nadin"

3 Publications

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Alcohol consumption and neurocognitive deficits in people with well-treated HIV in Switzerland.

PLoS One 2021 2;16(3):e0246579. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Infectious Diseases Service, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: Hazardous alcohol consumption and HIV infection increase the risk of neurocognitive impairment (NCI). We examined the association between alcohol consumption and specific neurocognitive domain function in people with HIV (PWH) taking modern antiretroviral therapy.

Methods: The Neurocognitive Assessment in the Metabolic and Aging Cohort (NAMACO) study is a prospective, longitudinal, multicentre and multilingual (French, German and Italian) study of patients aged ≥45 years old enrolled in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). Baseline data from 981 study participants were examined. Five neurocognitive domains were evaluated: motor skills, speed of information processing, attention/working memory, executive function and verbal episodic memory. NCI was examined as binary (presence/absence) and continuous (mean z-score) outcomes against Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) scores using logistic and linear regression models, respectively.

Results: Most participants (96.2%) had undetectable viral loads and 64% were aged >50 years old. Hazardous alcohol consumption was observed in 49.4% of participants and binge drinking in 4.2%. While alcohol consumption frequency and quantity were not associated with NCI, the practice of binge drinking was significantly associated with impaired motor skills and overall neurocognitive function in both binary (odds ratio, OR ≥2.0, P <0.05) and continuous (mean z-score difference -0.2 to -0.4, P ≤0.01) outcomes. A significant U-shaped distribution of AUDIT-C score was also observed for motor skills and overall neurocognitive function.

Conclusions: In this cohort of PWH with well-controlled HIV infection, NCI was associated with the practice of binge drinking rather than alcohol consumption frequency or quantity. Longitudinal analysis of alcohol consumption and NCI in this population is currently underway.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246579PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7924787PMC
March 2021

The association between depressive symptoms and neurocognitive impairment in people with well-treated HIV in Switzerland.

Int J STD AIDS 2021 Feb 25:956462420987434. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Infectious Diseases Service, 30635Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: Depression may contribute to neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in people with HIV (PWH). Attributing NCI to depression rather than to HIV is complicated as depression may be both a causal factor and an effect of NCI. This study aimed to determine the association between depressive symptoms and NCI among PWH with well-controlled infection.

Methods: The Neurocognitive Assessment in the Metabolic and Ageing Cohort study is an ongoing, prospective, longitudinal study of PWH aged ≥45 years old nested within the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. Neurocognitive Assessment in the Metabolic and Ageing Cohort study participants underwent neurocognitive assessment and grading of depressive symptoms using the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Neurocognitive impairment categories were defined using Frascati criteria. Participants with NCI related to neurological or psychiatric confounders other than depression were excluded. The cross-sectional association between the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression score and neurocognitive impairment was examined taking Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression score as a continuous variable and then as a binary variable using two score thresholds, 16 and 27.

Results: Excluding 79 participants with confounding factors, 902 participants were studied: 81% were men; 96% had plasma viral loads <50 copies/ml; 35% had neurocognitive impairment; 28% had Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scores ≥16. Higher Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scores were associated with female sex ( = 0.0003), non-Caucasian origin ( = 0.011) and current/past intravenous drug use ( = 0.002). Whilst neurocognitive impairment was associated with higher Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scores, the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression score was a poor predictor of having neurocognitive impairment (area under the ROC curve 0.604). Applying a Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression score threshold of 16 predicted the presence of neurocognitive impairment with a sensitivity of 38.3% (specificity 77.2%), increasing the threshold to 27 lowered sensitivity to 15.4% (specificity 93.6%).

Conclusion: In this large cohort of PWH in Switzerland, we did not observe a Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression score threshold that was sensitive in predicting neurocognitive impairment. As neurocognitive impairment was however associated with higher Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scores, the data support the screening for and treatment of depression among PWH diagnosed with neurocognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956462420987434DOI Listing
February 2021

Cross-Sectional and Cumulative Longitudinal Central Nervous System Penetration Effectiveness Scores Are Not Associated With Neurocognitive Impairment in a Well Treated Aging Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Population in Switzerland.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2019 Jul 8;6(7):ofz277. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Infectious Diseases Service, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.

Background: Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in people with human immunodeficiency virus (PWH) remains a concern despite potent antiretroviral therapy (ART). Higher central nervous system (CNS) penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores have been associated with better CNS human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication control, but the association between CPE and NCI remains controversial.

Methods: The Neurocognitive Assessment in the Metabolic and Aging Cohort (NAMACO) study is a subgroup of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) that invited patients aged ≥45 years enrolled in the SHCS and followed-up at NAMACO-affiliated centers in Switzerland to participate between May 2013 and November 2016. In total, 981 patients were enrolled, all of whom underwent standardized neurocognitive assessment. Neurocognitive impairment, if present, was characterized using Frascati criteria. The CPE scores of NAMACO study participants with undetectable plasma HIV-ribonucleic acid at enrollment (909 patients) were analyzed. Cross-sectional CPE scores (at neurocognitive assessment) were examined as potential predictors of NCI in multivariate logistic regression models. The analysis was then repeated taking CPE as a cumulative score (summarizing CPE scores from ART initiation to the time of neurocognitive assessment).

Results: Most patients were male (80%) and Caucasian (92%). Neurocognitive impairment was present in 40%: 27% with HIV-associated NCI (mostly asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment), and 13% with NCI related to other factors. None of the CPE scores, neither cross-sectional nor cumulative, was statistically significantly associated with NCI.

Conclusions: In this large cohort of aviremic PWH, we observed no association between NCI, whether HIV-associated or related to other factors, and CPE score, whether cross-sectional or cumulative.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz277DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6612860PMC
July 2019