Publications by authors named "Isamu Yuge"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessment of hyperacusis with a newly produced Japanese version of the Khalfa hyperacusis questionnaire.

Acta Otolaryngol 2017 Sep 10;137(9):957-961. Epub 2017 Apr 10.

a Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery , Keio University School of Medicine , Tokyo , Japan.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of a Japanese version of the Khalfa hyperacusis questionnaire (KHQ) and proposed a threshold KHQ score for classifying hyperacusis.

Methods: In total, 112 patients with hyperacusis (group A) and 103 patients without hyperacusis (group B). The patients in group A were further classified into the following subgroups: subjects with hyperacusis as their chief complaint (n = 26, group A1) and subjects with hyperacusis accompanied by chief complaints of tinnitus and/or hearing loss (n = 86, group A2).

Results: The average total questionnaire score for patients in group A was 11.8 ± 9.7, which was statistically significantly higher than that of patients in group B, 5.7 ± 4.8. Cronbach's coefficients for internal consistency were high for the total score (0.92). The average total scores for groups A1 and A2 were 18.1 ± 11.1 and 9.9 ± 8.4, respectively, and the difference between the groups was statistically significant.

Conclusions: We developed a Japanese version of the KHQ. It showed high reliability and validity; suggesting its usefulness in clinical practice. We propose that a total KHQ score of 16 is an appropriate cutoff for classifying hyperacusis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016489.2017.1306654DOI Listing
September 2017

[Evaluation of the quality of life in sudden deafness patients by HHIA (hearing Hatidicap Inventory) and questionnaire].

Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai Kaiho 2005 Dec;108(12):1158-64

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo.

After treatments, several patients with sudden deafness (SD) continued to have symptoms, including hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness. These unresolved symptoms and their effect on the quality of life (QOL) in SD patients have not been studied. We evaluated QOL using the Hearing handicap inventory (HHIA) and an original questionnaire in SD patients who had been treated more than 6 months prior to the study. Compared to results in bilateral sensorineural hearing were significantly lower in SD patients (p<0.01). In bil SNHL, this score peaked two to 10 years after onset of disease and decreased thereafter. The score peaked more than 10 years after onset of disease in patients with SD. While hearing and test scores were correlated in bil-SNHL, this was not observed in SD. About half of patients were embarrassed by hearing loss and tinnitus after treatment. Among patients who scored more than 44 points on HHIA, all reported hearing loss and tinnitus. When asked about subjective changes in hearing after treatment, 27% believed their hearing had improved, 60% believed there was no change, and 13% believed their hearing had deteriorated. Cases believing deterioration in hearing also had high scores on HHIA. Sequelae of SD may worsen QOL, driving embarrassed patients to visit other medical facilities in to improve their QOL. Even though hearing may not improve after initial treatment in ears affected by SD, informed consent about the clinical course and audiological follow-up should be done.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3950/jibiinkoka.108.1158DOI Listing
December 2005

Transplanted human amniotic epithelial cells express connexin 26 and Na-K-adenosine triphosphatase in the inner ear.

Transplantation 2004 May;77(9):1452-4

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Asahi, Matsumoto, Japan.

Cochlear fibrocytes are the crucial component of the inner ear homeostasis and its defect by various causes; GJB2 (connexin [Cx] 26) mutation, for example, leads to hearing loss. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of human amniotic epithelial cells, proposed to possess pluripotential properties, as a source of transplantation therapy in inner ear disease. The mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx26 and Na-K-adenosine triphosphatase, the immunohistologic expression of these proteins, and the cells' intercellular communication capacity were detected in vitro. Their transplantation into the guinea pig cochlea revealed the survival and expression of the proteins even 3 weeks after transplantation. Transplanted human amniotic epithelial cells were localized at the site where the proteins function, strongly indicating their cooperation in the regional potassium ion recycling. This technology suggests the therapeutic potential for the treatment of hearing loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-200405150-00023DOI Listing
May 2004

Mutations in the COCH gene are a frequent cause of autosomal dominant progressive cochleo-vestibular dysfunction, but not of Meniere's disease.

Eur J Hum Genet 2003 Oct;11(10):744-8

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan.

The COCH gene is the only gene identified in man that causes autosomal dominantly inherited hearing loss associated with vestibular dysfunction. The condition is rare and only five mutations have been reported worldwide. All affected families showed a similar progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Since Meniere's disease-like symptoms have also been described in some families, it was suggested that COCH mutations might be present in some patients diagnosed with Meniere's disease. In this study, using a Japanese population, we performed a COCH mutation analysis in 23 patients from independent families with autosomal dominant hearing impairment, four of whom reported vestibular symptoms, and also in 20 Meniere's patients. While a new point mutation, A119 T, was found in a patient with autosomal dominant hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, no mutations were found in the Meniere's patients. Like all other previously identified COCH mutations, the mutation identified here is a missense mutation located in the FCH domain of the protein. The current mutation is located in close spatial proximity to W117, in which a mutation (W117R) had previously been associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss. Model building suggests that, like the W117R mutation, the A119 T mutation does not affect the structural integrity of the FCH domain, but may interfere with the interaction with a yet unknown binding partner. We conclude that mutations in the COCH gene are responsible for a significant fraction of patients with autosomal dominantly inherited hearing loss accompanied by vestibular symptoms, but not for dominant hearing loss without vestibular dysfunction, or sporadic Meniere's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201043DOI Listing
October 2003

Intramucosal PCO2 measurement as a new monitoring method of free jejunal transfer following pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2003 Oct;112(5):1247-56

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Shizuolka Red Cross Hospital, Outemachi, Japan.

The choices for practical monitoring of free jejunal transfer have been quite limited because of its own characteristics, such as buried form, lack of skin surface, and the structure of a hollow viscous tract. Physiologically, it is known that tissue hypoxia caused by compromised perfusion leads to an increase of partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2). Because of its physiological properties, the diffusion of carbon dioxide is always equilibrated between the mucosa of a hollow viscous organ and its lumen. The intramucosal PCO2 (PiCO2) of the gastrointestinal tract can therefore be determined indirectly from the intraluminal PCO2, which is measured with the aid of the tonometer catheter. To develop an optimal monitoring method for free jejunal transfer, the authors proposed the application of PiCO2 measurement by a modified use of a tonometer catheter. Since May of 1999, the authors performed postoperative PiCO2 monitoring on 20 cases of reconstructed pharyngoesophageal tracts in 18 patients who underwent radical tumor resection and one-stage reconstruction at the Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital. All 20 cases were safely monitored by PiCO2 measurement without any complications associated with the use of the tonometer catheter. In the 17 cases that succeeded uneventfully, the mean values of PiCO2 were kept lower than 40 mmHg throughout the monitoring period. On the other hand, the other three cases (15 percent) needed reexploration due to development of vascular complications, which was alerted by an abrupt increase of PiCO2 in each case (229, 130, and 99.6 mmHg). Two of the patients were fortunately successfully treated by immediate reexploration, leading to a 95 percent overall success rate. No false-negative or false-positive cases were observed. The authors' experience suggests that PiCO2 measurement using a tonometer catheter can provide the surgeon with reliable information for evaluating the perfusion and viability of a free jejunal transfer. Simplified manipulation and the objectivity of the numerical data allow stable measurement of PiCO2 and prompt judgment of the adequacy of the perfusion, which could minimize the burden and anxiety of the surgeon, particularly in the early postoperative period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.PRS.0000080727.74314.34DOI Listing
October 2003

GJB2 deafness gene shows a specific spectrum of mutations in Japan, including a frequent founder mutation.

Hum Genet 2003 Apr 31;112(4):329-33. Epub 2003 Jan 31.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, 390-8621 Matsumoto, Japan.

Mutations in the GJB2 gene (connexin 26) are the major cause of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing impairment in many populations. In contrast to the volume of information regarding the involvement of GJB2 mutations in hearing impairment in populations of European ancestry, less is known regarding other ethnic groups. In this study, we analyzed the GJB2 gene for mutations in 1227 hearing-impaired Japanese individuals. This revealed a unique spectrum of GJB2 mutations, different from that found in the Caucasian population. The most frequent mutation in Japanese, 235delC, has never been reported in Caucasians. To investigate a possible founder effect for the 235delC mutation, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms in the vicinity of the GJB2 gene. Results were consistent with inheritance of the 235delC mutation from a common ancestor. The results of this study have important implications for genetic diagnostic testing for deafness in the Japanese population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-002-0889-xDOI Listing
April 2003

Identification of 605ins46, a novel GJB2 mutation in a Japanese family.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2002 Oct;29(4):379-82

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan.

Connexin 26 gene (GJB2) mutations are known to be responsible for a significant portion (30-80%) of autosomal recessive congenital severe to profound deafness. More than 60 recessive mutations in GJB2 have been reported and most consist of point mutations of a nucleotide. We report here a novel insertional GJB2 mutation consisting of a long repetitive nucleotide sequence. As compound heterozygotes of this mutation with 235delC express sensorineural hearing loss of variable severity, further analysis of the phenotype-genotype relationship is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0385-8146(02)00055-xDOI Listing
October 2002

Molecular diagnosis of deafness: impact of gene identification.

Audiol Neurootol 2002 May-Jun;7(3):185-90

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Asahi, Matsumoto, Japan.

Recent progress in identifying genes responsible for hearing loss enables the ENT clinician to apply molecular diagnosis by genetic testing. This article focuses on three genes, which are prevalent and therefore commonly encountered in the clinic. GJB2 (connexin 26) is currently recognized as the most prevalent gene responsible for congenital hearing loss in many countries. A series of reports revealed that different combinations of GJB2 mutations exist in different ethnic populations, indicating that ethnic background should be considered when performing genetic testing. GJB2 mutations will be of particular interest in combination with universal infant hearing screening programs, because it has been shown that early identification of hearing loss and early intervention are crucial for language development. Progress in genetic analysis has changed the concept of diseases. The present review introduces the example of two historically distinct categories of disease, Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, which are currently considered to be a continuum of diseases caused by the same gene, PDS. This review also emphasizes that some hearing impairment can be prevented. The 1555A-->G mitochondrial mutation, the most prevalent mitochondrial mutation found in the hearing-impaired population, was found in approximately 3% of the outpatients. The 1555A-->G mutation is known to be associated with a susceptibility to aminoglycoside antibiotics. There may be a considerably large high-risk population and to avoid possible side effects in this group, a rapid mass screening system and careful counseling are recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000058308DOI Listing
August 2002
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