Publications by authors named "Isabella Provenzale"

7 Publications

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Assessment of a complete and classified platelet proteome from genome-wide transcripts of human platelets and megakaryocytes covering platelet functions.

Sci Rep 2021 Jun 11;11(1):12358. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Novel platelet and megakaryocyte transcriptome analysis allows prediction of the full or theoretical proteome of a representative human platelet. Here, we integrated the established platelet proteomes from six cohorts of healthy subjects, encompassing 5.2 k proteins, with two novel genome-wide transcriptomes (57.8 k mRNAs). For 14.8 k protein-coding transcripts, we assigned the proteins to 21 UniProt-based classes, based on their preferential intracellular localization and presumed function. This classified transcriptome-proteome profile of platelets revealed: (i) Absence of 37.2 k genome-wide transcripts. (ii) High quantitative similarity of platelet and megakaryocyte transcriptomes (R = 0.75) for 14.8 k protein-coding genes, but not for 3.8 k RNA genes or 1.9 k pseudogenes (R = 0.43-0.54), suggesting redistribution of mRNAs upon platelet shedding from megakaryocytes. (iii) Copy numbers of 3.5 k proteins that were restricted in size by the corresponding transcript levels (iv) Near complete coverage of identified proteins in the relevant transcriptome (log2fpkm > 0.20) except for plasma-derived secretory proteins, pointing to adhesion and uptake of such proteins. (v) Underrepresentation in the identified proteome of nuclear-related, membrane and signaling proteins, as well proteins with low-level transcripts. We then constructed a prediction model, based on protein function, transcript level and (peri)nuclear localization, and calculated the achievable proteome at ~ 10 k proteins. Model validation identified 1.0 k additional proteins in the predicted classes. Network and database analysis revealed the presence of 2.4 k proteins with a possible role in thrombosis and hemostasis, and 138 proteins linked to platelet-related disorders. This genome-wide platelet transcriptome and (non)identified proteome database thus provides a scaffold for discovering the roles of unknown platelet proteins in health and disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-91661-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8196183PMC
June 2021

Nonredundant Roles of Platelet Glycoprotein VI and Integrin αIIbβ3 in Fibrin-Mediated Microthrombus Formation.

Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2021 02 3;41(2):e97-e111. Epub 2020 Dec 3.

Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, Maastricht University, the Netherlands (G.P., J.H., I.P., F.S., P.E.J.v.d.M., R.A.S.A., S.P.W., J.W.M.H.).

Objective: Fibrin is considered to strengthen thrombus formation via integrin αIIbβ3, but recent findings indicate that fibrin can also act as ligand for platelet glycoprotein VI. Approach and Results: To investigate the thrombus-forming potential of fibrin and the roles of platelet receptors herein, we generated a range of immobilized fibrin surfaces, some of which were cross-linked with factor XIIIa and contained VWF-BP (von Willebrand factor-binding peptide). Multicolor microfluidics assays with whole-blood flowed at high shear rate (1000 s) indicated that the fibrin surfaces, regardless of the presence of factor XIIIa or VWF-BP, supported platelet adhesion and activation (P-selectin expression), but only microthrombi were formed consisting of bilayers of platelets. Fibrinogen surfaces produced similar microthrombi. Markedly, tiggering of coagulation with tissue factor or blocking of thrombin no more than moderately affected the fibrin-induced microthrombus formation. Absence of αIIbβ3 in Glanzmann thrombasthenia annulled platelet adhesion. Blocking of glycoprotein VI with Fab 9O12 substantially, but incompletely reduced platelet secretion, Ca signaling and aggregation, while inhibition of Syk further reduced these responses. In platelet suspension, glycoprotein VI blockage or Syk inhibition prevented fibrin-induced platelet aggregation. Microthrombi on fibrin surfaces triggered only minimal thrombin generation, in spite of thrombin binding to the fibrin fibers.

Conclusions: Together, these results indicate that fibrin fibers, regardless of their way of formation, act as a consolidating surface in microthrombus formation via nonredundant roles of platelet glycoprotein VI and integrin αIIbβ3 through signaling via Syk and low-level Ca rises.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.120.314641DOI Listing
February 2021

Platelet-primed interactions of coagulation and anticoagulation pathways in flow-dependent thrombus formation.

Sci Rep 2020 07 17;10(1):11910. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Departments of Biochemistry and Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University Medical Centre+, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

In haemostasis and thrombosis, platelet, coagulation and anticoagulation pathways act together to produce fibrin-containing thrombi. We developed a microspot-based technique, in which we assessed platelet adhesion, platelet activation, thrombus structure and fibrin clot formation in real time using flowing whole blood. Microspots were made from distinct platelet-adhesive surfaces in the absence or presence of tissue factor, thrombomodulin or activated protein C. Kinetics of platelet activation, thrombus structure and fibrin formation were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. This work revealed: (1) a priming role of platelet adhesion in thrombus contraction and subsequent fibrin formation; (2) a surface-independent role of tissue factor, independent of the shear rate; (3) a mechanism of tissue factor-enhanced activation of the intrinsic coagulation pathway; (4) a local, suppressive role of the anticoagulant thrombomodulin/protein C pathway under flow. Multiparameter analysis using blood samples from patients with (anti)coagulation disorders indicated characteristic defects in thrombus formation, in cases of factor V, XI or XII deficiency; and in contrast, thrombogenic effects in patients with factor V-Leiden. Taken together, this integrative phenotyping approach of platelet-fibrin thrombus formation has revealed interaction mechanisms of platelet-primed key haemostatic pathways with alterations in patients with (anti)coagulation defects. It can help as an important functional add-on whole-blood phenotyping.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68438-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7368055PMC
July 2020

Thrombo-Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease: An Expert Consensus Document from the Third Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis.

Thromb Haemost 2020 Apr 14;120(4):538-564. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Department of Hematology and Central Hematology Laboratory, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany; Haemostasis Research Unit, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Thrombo-inflammation describes the complex interplay between blood coagulation and inflammation that plays a critical role in cardiovascular diseases. The third Maastricht Consensus Conference on Thrombosis assembled basic, translational, and clinical scientists to discuss the origin and potential consequences of thrombo-inflammation in the etiology, diagnostics, and management of patients with cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease. This article presents a state-of-the-art reflection of expert opinions and consensus recommendations regarding the following topics: (1) challenges of the endothelial cell barrier; (2) circulating cells and thrombo-inflammation, focused on platelets, neutrophils, and neutrophil extracellular traps; (3) procoagulant mechanisms; (4) arterial vascular changes in atherogenesis; attenuating atherosclerosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury; (5) management of patients with arterial vascular disease; and (6) pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and late consequences of venous thromboembolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1708035DOI Listing
April 2020

Localized endothelial-based control of platelet aggregation and coagulation under flow: A proof-of-principle vessel-on-a-chip study.

J Thromb Haemost 2020 04 20;18(4):931-941. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: In the intact vessel wall, endothelial cells form a barrier between the blood and the remaining vascular structures, serving to maintain blood fluidity and preventing platelet activation and fibrin clot formation. The spatiotemporal space of this inhibition is largely unknown.

Objective: To assess the local inhibitory roles of a discontinuous endothelium, we developed a vessel-on-a-chip model, consisting of a microfluidic chamber coated with the thrombogenic collagen and tissue factor (TF), and covered with patches of human endothelial cells. By flow perfusion of human blood and plasma, the heterogeneous formation of platelet aggregates and fibrin clots was monitored by multicolor fluorescence microscopy.

Results: On collagen/TF coatings, a coverage of 40% to 60% of human umbilical vein endothelial cells resulted in a strong overall delay in platelet deposition and fibrin fiber formation under flow. Fibrin formation colocalized with the deposited platelets, and was restricted to regions in between endothelial cells, thus pointing to immediate local suppression of the clotting process. Fibrin kinetics were enhanced by treatment of the cells with heparinase III, partially disrupting the glycocalyx, and to a lesser degree by antagonism of the endothelial thrombomodulin. Co-coating of purified thrombomodulin and collagen had a similar coagulation-suppressing effect as endothelial thrombomodulin.

Conclusions: In this vessel-on-a-chip system with patches of endothelial cells on thrombogenic surfaces, the coagulant activity under flow is regulated by: (a) the residual exposure of trigger (collagen/TF), (b) the endothelial glycocalyx, and (c) to a lesser degree the endothelial thrombomodulin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.14719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7187151PMC
April 2020

Whole Blood Based Multiparameter Assessment of Thrombus Formation in Standard Microfluidic Devices to Proxy In Vivo Haemostasis and Thrombosis.

Micromachines (Basel) 2019 Nov 16;10(11). Epub 2019 Nov 16.

Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Microfluidic assays are versatile tests which, using only small amounts of blood, enable high throughput analyses of platelet function in several minutes. In combination with fluorescence microscopy, these flow tests allow real-time visualisation of platelet activation with the possibility of examining combinatorial effects of wall shear rate, coagulation and modulation by endothelial cells. In particular, the ability to use blood and blood cells from healthy subjects or patients makes this technology promising, both for research and (pre)clinical diagnostic purposes. In the present review, we describe how microfluidic devices are used to assess the roles of platelets in thrombosis and haemostasis. We place emphasis on technical aspects and on experimental designs that make the concept of "blood-vessel-component-on-a-chip" an attractive, rapidly developing technology for the study of the complex biological processes of blood coagulability in the presence of flow.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/mi10110787DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6915499PMC
November 2019

Role of Platelet Glycoprotein VI and Tyrosine Kinase Syk in Thrombus Formation on Collagen-Like Surfaces.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Jun 7;20(11). Epub 2019 Jun 7.

Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, 6229 ER Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Platelet interaction with collagens, via von Willebrand factor, is a potent trigger of shear-dependent thrombus formation mediated by subsequent engagement of the signaling collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP)VI, enforced by integrin αβ. Protein tyrosine kinase Syk is central in the GPVI-induced signaling pathway, leading to elevated cytosolic Ca. We aimed to determine the Syk-mediated thrombogenic activity of several collagen peptides and (fibrillar) type I and III collagens. High-shear perfusion of blood over microspots of these substances resulted in thrombus formation, which was assessed by eight parameters and was indicative of platelet adhesion, activation, aggregation, and contraction, which were affected by the Syk inhibitor PRT-060318. In platelet suspensions, only collagen peptides containing the consensus GPVI-activating sequence (GPO) and Horm-type collagen evoked Syk-dependent Ca rises. In whole blood under flow, Syk inhibition suppressed platelet activation and aggregation parameters for the collagen peptides with or without a (GPO) sequence and for all of the collagens. Prediction models based on a regression analysis indicated a mixed role of GPVI in thrombus formation on fibrillar collagens, which was abolished by Syk inhibition. Together, these findings indicate that GPVI-dependent signaling through Syk supports platelet activation in thrombus formation on collagen-like structures regardless of the presence of a (GPO) sequence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20112788DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6600290PMC
June 2019
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