Publications by authors named "Isaac Olushola Ogunkola"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dealing with two 'SARS' outbreaks in Nigeria: The public health implications.

Public Health Pract (Oxf) 2021 Nov 13;2:100054. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhip.2020.100054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8411837PMC
November 2021

The use of antibiotics in COVID-19 management: a rapid review of national treatment guidelines in 10 African countries.

Trop Med Health 2021 Jun 23;49(1):51. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Antimicrobial resistance is a hidden threat lurking behind the COVID-19 pandemic which has claimed thousands of lives prior to the emergence of the global outbreak. With a pandemic on the scale of COVID-19, antimicrobial resistance has the potential to become a double-edged sword with the overuse of antibiotics having the potential of taking us back to the pre-antibiotic era. Antimicrobial resistance is majorly attributed to widespread and unnecessary use of antibiotics, among other causes, which has facilitated the emergence and spread of resistant pathogens. Our study aimed to conduct a rapid review of national treatment guidelines for COVID-19 in 10 African countries (Ghana, Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Liberia, Ethiopia, and Rwanda) and examined its implication for antimicrobial resistance response on the continent. Our findings revealed that various antibiotics, such as azithromycin, doxycycline, clarithromycin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, gentamicin, benzylpenicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, cefepime, vancomycin, meropenem, and cefuroxime among others, were recommended for use in the management of COVID-19. This is worrisome in that COVID-19 is a viral disease and only a few COVID-19 patients would have bacterial co-infection. Our study highlighted the need to emphasize prudent and judicious use of antibiotics in the management of COVID-19 in Africa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41182-021-00344-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8220112PMC
June 2021

Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on antenatal healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Public Health Pract (Oxf) 2021 Nov 11;2:100076. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.

Many Sub-Saharan African countries have been known to suffer various challenges which threaten the quality of health services that are offered to the population. With the emergence of COVID-19 outbreak, it is not impossible that access to quality antenatal care services would be further threatened in the region due to the competition for limited health care resources. This paper seeks to highlight the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on antenatal healthcare services in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is imperative for all African countries to put up measures to ensure antenatal care services, which are just as important and needed, are not disrupted due to the urgent need to shift limited resources to contain the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhip.2021.100076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8204802PMC
November 2021

COVID-19 pandemic: impacts on the achievements of Sustainable Development Goals in Africa.

Pan Afr Med J 2021 11;38:251. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Since the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, Africa has made some progress towards its achievements, particularly in the area of gender equality- SDG 5, climate change -SDG 13 and preserving life on land- SDG 15. Although, some African countries have made tangible impact on the other goals such as health, food production and economic growth; these efforts experienced some setbacks with attention shifting to curbing the spread of the novel coronavirus. As much as mitigating the spread of the spread of COVID-19 is important, so is ensuring efforts made on other goals are not lost, as the SDGs are much interconnected, and failure in one impacts others. For the African continent to achieve sustainable development beyond COVID-19, strategic actions which will involve innovations, evaluations and strong political will towards implementations must be taken by relevant stakeholders, so the continent is not left behind in the global goals achievement by 2030.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2021.38.251.27065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8164424PMC
June 2021

While flattening the curve and raising the line, Africa should not forget street vending practices.

Health Promot Perspect 2021 7;11(1):32-35. Epub 2021 Feb 7.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Street vending practices are common in Africa and cater to a large portion of the continent's population. Since the identification of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Africa, various governments have implemented measures to control the spread of infection. These measures may have an adverse effect on street vending practices. This paper demonstrates the extent to which COVID-19 measures of control and prevention affects street vending practices in Africa and how it can be remedied. There has been reduced economic growth and increased hunger among individuals involved in street vending practices due to the prohibitions put in place by governments. Measures directed at curbing the spread of the virus inadvertently affect street vending practices and vendors. Current and future pandemic response plans should reflect the integration of measures directed at reducing potential hardship and a further economic set back for individuals involved in street vending practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/hpp.2021.05DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967131PMC
February 2021

Who Will Pay for the COVID-19 Vaccines for Africa?

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2021 Jan 7. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Africa's health systems are strained by the COVID-19 pandemic. There are global efforts toward the development and trial of COVID-19 vaccines. However, considering the challenges and economic conditions of African nations, there could be limited access and availability of the vaccines on the continent. This will be the result of high cost and technical requirements to acquire the vaccines. There are indications that possible donor funding for COVID-19 vaccines from rich countries maybe put off considering the various challenges they face currently and the moves they are making in response to the disease. The issue of justice in health for protecting the vulnerable populations and regions also supports the need for COVID-19 vaccine availability on the African continent. Means to achieve uniform control of the disease burden across the globe should be adopted. Governments of African nations should also scale up their efforts toward COVID-19 vaccine acquisition and utilization through viable efforts. It is therefore important to assist the African continent in acquiring the COVID-19 vaccines by leveling all power dynamics that will affect access and distribution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-1506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7941795PMC
January 2021

COVID-19 Misinformation and Infodemic in Rural Africa.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2020 Dec 30. Epub 2020 Dec 30.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

The world has witnessed rapid advancement and changes since the COVID-19 pandemic emerged in Wuhan, China. The significant changes experienced during these times remain unprecedented. The African continent has initiated significant responses to curb the spread of the pandemic. However, there is an increasing concern that rural Africa is facing serious challenges in their responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is due to the uncertainty if the populations are detached from or in synch with information on COVID-19. The findings reported here suggest that rural Africa is burdened with misinformation and infodemic regarding COVID-19 due to widespread misconceptions and anecdotal reports. It is, therefore, necessary to engage with community leaders to provide awareness campaigns in rural communities to ensure access to reliable information issued by local and international health authorities. It is pertinent to set up avenues that improve health literacy in communities in rural Africa as it is a major determinant of information assimilation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-1488DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7866344PMC
December 2020

Impact of COVID-19 on access to healthcare in low- and middle-income countries: Current evidence and future recommendations.

Int J Health Plann Manage 2021 Jan 28;36(1):13-17. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a major public health threat globally and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are not an exception. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is far-reaching on many areas including but not limited to global health security, economic and healthcare delivery with a potential impact on access to healthcare in LMICs. We evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on access to healthcare in LMICs, as well as plausible strategies that can be put in place to ensure that the delivery of healthcare is not halted. In order to mitigate the devastating effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the already weak health systems in LMICs, it is much necessary to reinforce and scale up interventions and proactive measures that will ensure that access to healthcare is not disrupted even in course of the pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3067DOI Listing
January 2021

Rural communities in Africa should not be forgotten in responses to COVID-19.

Int J Health Plann Manage 2020 Nov 13;35(6):1302-1305. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.

Rural areas in Africa make up a large proportion of the continent. Since the emergence of COVID-19 on the continent, major attention and responses have been placed on urban areas. Rural areas are typified by certain challenges which may serve as limitations to the provision of resources and tools for COVID-19 responses in these areas. These major challenges include limited access to these areas due to poor road networks which may hamper the possibility of conveying resources and manpower. Shortage of healthcare workforce in these areas, poor health facilities/structures and limited access to COVID-19 diagnostics services may also make containment challenging. It is therefore important that investment should be made in these areas towards providing the necessary tools, resources, and manpower to ensure effective containment of COVID-19 and to alleviate the plight caused by the pandemic in rural Africa. Rural communities in Africa should not be left behind in COVID-19 responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7436649PMC
November 2020

SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing in Africa: needs and challenges.

Pan Afr Med J 2020 14;35(Suppl 2). Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2020.35.4.22703DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7266476PMC
June 2020
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