Publications by authors named "Isaac Boateng"

10 Publications

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Osmotic, osmovacuum, sonication, and osmosonication pretreatment on the infrared drying of Ginkgo seed slices: Mass transfer, mathematical modeling, drying, and rehydration kinetics and energy consumption.

J Food Sci 2021 Sep 21. Epub 2021 Sep 21.

School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, P. R. China.

This study evaluated the mass transfer, drying, and rehydration kinetics (drying and rehydration curve, moisture diffusivity [D ]), energy consumption (specific energy consumption [SEC], moisture extraction rate (MER), and specific moisture extraction rate [SMER]), and mathematical modeling of infrared dried Ginkgo biloba seed (GBS) using the various nonthermal pretreatments namely: osmotic (OS), osmovacuum (V + OS), ultrasound (US, ginkgo seed immersed in a distilled water with US), and osmosonication (US + OS, ginkgo seeds immersed in an OS solution with US). Results showed that various pretreatments affected mass transfer, drying, and rehydration characteristics, and energy consumption, which was confirmed by principal component analysis. In terms of mass transfer, US pretreatment recorded the highest weight loss while the osmosonication pretreatment registered the highest solid gain. The entire drying process occurred in the falling-rate period. The D values were within the normal range of agroproducts (10 to 10 m /s). The modified Page-I and Weibull model best fitted the drying and rehydration kinetics, respectively, with the coefficient of determination (R ) > 0.991, root mean square error, residual sum of squares, and reduced chi-square closer to zero, compared with the other models. The untreated GBS (control) had the lowest energy efficiency (lowest SMER and MER) and the highest SEC than the pretreated GBS. Among the various pretreatments, the US pretreatment of GBS was superior, with the highest D , MER, SMER, and drying rate, and lowest drying time and SEC. Based on the findings, sequential US pretreatment and infrared drying is a feasible drying technique for GBS that could be used commercially. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Ginkgo tree cultivation in China has exceeded market needs with 60,000 tons per annum of GBS produced. Hence, there is a compelling need to explore new chances to use GBS availability irrespective of the seasonality and address the problem where GBS utilization is limited to the early phases of home-cooked dishes. Although drying increases the shelf life of ginkgo seeds, there is a higher operation cost. Thus, pretreatment can reduce energy consumption and augment the product quality is ideal. This research reported the impact of nonthermal pretreatments on ginkgo seeds' mass transfer, drying, and rehydration characteristics. The present results will provide a comprehensive understanding of the engineering application of ginkgo seed pretreatment, allowing for the best technique to be selected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.15916DOI Listing
September 2021

Predicting factors that determine patients' satisfaction with post-operative pain management following abdominal surgeries at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.

PLoS One 2021 25;16(5):e0251979. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of Physiology, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.

Introduction: Poorly controlled postoperative pain has been known to be characterized by longer post-operative care, longer hospital stays with increased readmission rates, and decreased patient satisfaction. Post-operative pain has been continuously addressed in the past three (3) to four (4) decades and has been shown that 20 to 80% of post-operative patients suffer ineffective pain management.

Objective: The study was aimed at assessing the factors that may predict the satisfaction of patients with early postoperative pain management following abdominal surgeries at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi.

Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among patients who had undergone abdominal surgeries between October 2019 and December 2019 at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Structured questionnaires based on the IPO-Q were used to obtain responses from the patients. Descriptive and Inferential statistical analysis were employed in analyzing the data obtained from the respondents of the study.

Results: 138 patients were involved in this study. The mean age of patients in the study was 45.81 (±16.81) years. A higher percentage, 58.7% of the patients were males. 39.1% had completed their tertiary level of education. The majority (50.7%) of the patients had had persistent pain for more than three (3) months. The satisfaction of the patients with the post-operative pain management received was generally high among a significant majority of the patients. Meanwhile, among the factors that influence the satisfaction of the patients with the post-operative pain management received, type of analgesia and pain relief methods (Pearson Coefficient = 0.523, p-value <0.05), patient's ability to request more pain relief, (Pearson Coefficient = 0.29, p-value <0.05), patient's access to information about their pain treatment options from the Nurses (Pearson coefficient = -0.22, p<0.05), were the only predictors of satisfaction in patients.

Conclusion: This study found out that patients were generally satisfied with the post-operative pain management offered by their healthcare providers although the degree of satisfaction depended largely on the type of analgesia and pain relief methods, the ability to request for more pain relief, and access to information on pain treatment.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0251979PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8148314PMC
May 2021

One-time application of biochar influenced crop yield across three cropping cycles on tropical sandy loam soil in Ghana.

Heliyon 2021 Feb 17;7(2):e06267. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture and Natural Science, University of Cape Coast, Ghana.

The preparation and application of biochar by smallholder farmers is labour intensive hence an effective one-time application for multiple cropping seasons would be desirable by farmers and researchers. In this study, one-time biochar application as a soil amendment and its interaction with compost and NPK on yield performances of different crops was investigated across three cropping seasons. Treatments included biochar applied alone or together with compost, inorganic NPK fertilizer or both. Maize, okra and cassava were planted in succession and data was collected on their shoot N, P and K concentrations, yields as well as selected soil parameters (pH, exchangeable acidity, total exchangeable bases, effective cation exchange capacity, total N, total organic carbon, available phosphorus). Data was analyzed with GenSTAT and results were presented in tables and bar graph. Corn cob biochar applied solely did not significantly improve maize and okra yield in the first and second cropping season but increased yield of cassava significantly at the third cropping season. Yield increased in sole NPK, compost and NPK + compost treatments for all cropping cycles, but yields obtained from these treatments in the presence of biochar were greater than their corresponding treatments without biochar. The study also showed that biochar application together with compost, NPK or both, improved total organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, total exchangeable bases, exchangeable acidity, effective cation exchange capacity and pH as well as tissue N, P and K of all crops. Our findings demonstrated that a single application of biochar, particularly in the presence of compost, inorganic NPK fertilizer or both can increase yields across three cropping seasons and improve soil fertility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2021.e06267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902543PMC
February 2021

Effect of different drying methods on product quality, bioactive and toxic components of Ginkgo biloba L. seed.

J Sci Food Agric 2021 Jun 7;101(8):3290-3297. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China.

Background: Ginkgo biloba seeds are used as a functional food across Asia. However, the presence of toxic compounds has limited their application. In this study, freeze drying, infrared drying, hot-air drying and pulsed-vacuum drying were used to dry G. biloba seeds. A comprehensive analysis was performed on their product quality, antioxidant activities, bioactive and toxic components.

Results: Results showed that the drying methods had a significant influence on product quality with freeze drying being superior due to the minimal microstructural damage, followed by infrared drying and pulsed-vacuum drying. Infrared-dried product possessed the strongest antioxidant activities and higher bioactive compound content than hot-air-dried and pulsed-vacuum-dried product. Toxic compounds in fresh G. biloba seeds (ginkgotoxin, ginkgolic acid and cyanide) were reduced markedly by drying. Ginkgotoxin was reduced fourfold, and the contents of acrylamide, ginkgolic acid and cyanide in dried G. biloba seeds were reduced to the scope of safety. Amongst the four drying methods, infrared drying had the shortest drying time, and its product showed higher quality and bioactive compound content, and stronger antioxidant activities.

Conclusions: These findings will offer salient information for selecting a drying method during the processing of ginkgo seeds. Infrared drying could be considered as a multiple-effect drying method in the processing of ginkgo seeds. © 2020 Society of Chemical Industry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.10958DOI Listing
June 2021

Diagnostic capacity, and predictive values of rapid diagnostic tests for accurate diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in febrile children in Asante-Akim, Ghana.

Malar J 2018 Dec 14;17(1):468. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Worldwide Universities Network, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Legon, Accra, Ghana.

Background: This study seeks to compare the performance of HRP2 (First Response) and pLDH/HRP2 (Combo) RDTs for falciparum malaria against microscopy and PCR in acutely ill febrile children at presentation and follow-up.

Methods: This is an interventional study that recruited children < 5 years who reported to health facilities with a history of fever within the past 72 h or a documented axillary temperature of 37.5 °C. Using a longitudinal approach, recruitment and follow-up of participants was done between January and May 2012. Based on results of HRP2-RDT screening, the children were grouped into one of the following three categories: (1) tested positive for malaria using RDT and received anti-malarial treatment (group 1, n = 85); (2) tested negative for malaria using RDT and were given anti-malarial treatment by the admitting physician (group 2, n = 74); or, (3) tested negative for malaria using RDT and did not receive any anti-malarial treatment (group 3, n = 101). Independent microscopy, PCR and Combo-RDT tests were done for each sample on day 0 and all follow-up days.

Results: Mean age of the study participants was 22 months and females accounted for nearly 50%. At the time of diagnosis, the mean body temperature was 37.9 °C (range 35-40.1 °C). Microscopic parasite density ranged between 300 and 99,500 parasites/µL. With microscopy as gold standard, the sensitivity of HRP2 and Combo-RDTs were 95.1 and 96.3%, respectively. The sensitivities, specificities and predictive values for RDTs were relatively higher in microscopy-defined malaria cases than in PCR positive-defined cases. On day 0, participants who initially tested negative for HRP2 were positive by microscopy (n = 2), Combo (n = 1) and PCR (n = 17). On days 1 and 2, five of the children in this group (initially HRP2-negative) tested positive by PCR alone. On day 28, four patients who were originally HRP2-negative tested positive for microscopy (n = 2), Combo (n = 2) and PCR (n = 4).

Conclusion: The HRP2/pLDH RDTs showed comparable diagnostic accuracy in children presenting with an acute febrile illness to health facilities in a hard-to-reach rural area in Ghana. Nevertheless, discordant results recorded on day 0 and follow-up visits using the recommended RDTs means improved malaria diagnostic capability in malaria-endemic regions is necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-018-2613-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295071PMC
December 2018

Targeted community based interventions improved malaria management competencies in rural Ghana.

Glob Health Res Policy 2017 2;2:29. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

Worldwide Universities Network, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Legon, Accra, Ghana.

Background: Malaria is one of the most challenging public health concerns in the developing world. To address its impact in endemic regions, several interventions are implemented by stakeholders. The Affordable Medicine Facility-malaria (AMFm) is an example of such interventions. Its activities include communication interventions to enhance the knowledge of caregivers of children under five years, licensed chemical sellers (LCS) and prescribers on malaria management with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the AMFm activities on malaria among targeted groups in two rural communities in Ghana.

Methods: A communication intervention study was conducted in the Asante-Akim North and South Districts of Ghana. Repeated cross-sectional pre and post surveys were deployed. Relevant malaria messages were designed and used to develop the information, education and communication (IEC) tools for the intervention. With the aid of posters and flipcharts developed by our study, community health workers (CHWs), prescribers, and licenced chemical sellers provided proper counselling to clients on malaria management. Trained CHWs and community based volunteers educated caregivers of children under five years on malaria management at their homes and at public gatherings such as churches, mosques, schools. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were run to determine associations and control for demographic differences respectively.

Results: There was significantly high exposure to malaria/ACT interventions in the intervention district than in the comparison district (OR = 16.02; 95% CI = 7.88-32.55) and same for malaria/ACT-related knowledge (OR = 3.63; 95% CI = 2.52-5.23). The participants in the intervention district were also more knowledgeable about correct administration of dispersible drug for children <5 years than their counterparts in the unexposed district.

Conclusion: Our data show that targeted interventions improve malaria based competences in rural community settings. The availability of subsidized ACTs and the intensity of the communication campaigns contributed to the AMFm-related awareness, improved knowledge on malaria/ACTs and management practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41256-017-0048-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5683319PMC
October 2017

Rapid outbreak sequencing of Ebola virus in Sierra Leone identifies transmission chains linked to sporadic cases.

Virus Evol 2016 Jan 22;2(1):vew016. Epub 2016 Jun 22.

Thermo Fisher Scientific, South San Francisco, CA, USA.

To end the largest known outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa and to prevent new transmissions, rapid epidemiological tracing of cases and contacts was required. The ability to quickly identify unknown sources and chains of transmission is key to ending the EVD epidemic and of even greater importance in the context of recent reports of Ebola virus (EBOV) persistence in survivors. Phylogenetic analysis of complete EBOV genomes can provide important information on the source of any new infection. A local deep sequencing facility was established at the Mateneh Ebola Treatment Centre in central Sierra Leone. The facility included all wetlab and computational resources to rapidly process EBOV diagnostic samples into full genome sequences. We produced 554 EBOV genomes from EVD cases across Sierra Leone. These genomes provided a detailed description of EBOV evolution and facilitated phylogenetic tracking of new EVD cases. Importantly, we show that linked genomic and epidemiological data can not only support contact tracing but also identify unconventional transmission chains involving body fluids, including semen. Rapid EBOV genome sequencing, when linked to epidemiological information and a comprehensive database of virus sequences across the outbreak, provided a powerful tool for public health epidemic control efforts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ve/vew016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5499387PMC
January 2016

A DFT+U investigation of hydrogen adsorption on the LaFeO(010) surface.

Phys Chem Chem Phys 2017 Mar;19(10):7399-7409

Department of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 9, 3584 CC, Utrecht, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ, UK and School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT, UK.

The ABO perovskite lanthanum ferrite (LaFeO) is a technologically important electrode material for nickel-metal hydride batteries, energy storage and catalysis. However, the electrochemical hydrogen adsorption mechanism on LaFeO surfaces remains under debate. In the present study, we have employed spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, with the Hubbard U correction (DFT+U), to unravel the adsorption mechanism of H on the LaFeO(010) surface. We show from our calculated adsorption energies that the preferred site for H adsorption is the Fe-O bridge site, with an adsorption energy of -1.18 eV (including the zero point energy), which resulted in the formation of FeOH and FeH surface species. H adsorption at the surface oxygen resulted in the formation of a water molecule, which leaves the surface to create an oxygen vacancy. The H molecule is found to interact weakly with the Fe and La sites, where it is only physisorbed. The electronic structures of the surface-adsorption systems are discussed via projected density of state and Löwdin population analyses. The implications of the calculated adsorption strengths and structures are discussed in terms of the improved design of nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery prototypes based on LaFeO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cp08698eDOI Listing
March 2017

Insights into the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria in Ghana: the role of caregivers and licensed chemical sellers in four regions.

Malar J 2016 05 10;15(1):263. Epub 2016 May 10.

Department of Biological, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 13, Legon, Accra, Ghana.

Background: The Affordable Medicine Facility-malaria (AMFm) was an innovative global financing mechanism for the provision of quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) across both the private and public health sectors in eight countries in sub-Saharan Africa. This study evaluated the effectiveness of AMFm subsidies in increasing access to ACT in Ghana and documented malaria management practices at the household and community levels during the implementation of the AMFm.

Methods: This study, conducted in four regions in Ghana between January, 2011 to December, 2012, employed cross-sectional mixed-methods design that included qualitative and quantitative elements, specifically household surveys, focus group discussions (FGD) and in-depth interviews.

Results: The study indicated high ACT availability, adequate provider knowledge and reasonably low quality-assured ACT use in the study areas, all of which are a reflection of a high market share of ACT in these hard-to-reach areas of the country. Adequate recognition of childhood malaria symptoms by licensed chemical seller (LCS) attendants was observed. A preference by caregivers for LCS over health facilities for seeking treatment solutions to childhood malaria was found.

Conclusions: Artemisinin-based combination therapy with the AMFm logo was accessible and affordable for most people seeking treatment from health facilities and LCS shops in rural areas. Caregivers and LCS were seen to play key roles in the health of the community especially with children under 5 years of age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1307-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862058PMC
May 2016

Notes from the Field: Ebola Virus Disease Response Activities During a Mass Displacement Event After Flooding--Freetown, Sierra Leone, September-November, 2015.

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016 Feb 26;65(7):188-9. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Since the start of the Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa, Sierra Leone has reported 8,706 confirmed Ebola cases and 3,956 deaths. During September 15-16, 2015, heavy rains flooded the capital, Freetown, resulting in eight deaths, home and property destruction, and thousands of persons in need of assistance. By September 27, approximately 13,000 flood-affected persons registered for flood relief services from the government. On September 17, two stadiums in Freetown were opened to provide shelter and assistance to flood-affected residents; a total of approximately 3,000 persons stayed overnight in both stadiums (Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation, personal communication, September 2015). On the same day the stadiums were opened to flood-affected persons, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MoHS) and Western Area Ebola Response Center (WAERC) staff members from CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), and the African Union evaluated the layout, logistics, and services at both stadiums and identified an immediate need to establish Ebola response activities. The patient in the last Ebola case in the Western Area, which includes Freetown, had died 37 days earlier, on August 11; however, transmission elsewhere in Sierra Leone was ongoing, and movement of persons throughout the country was common.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6507a4DOI Listing
February 2016
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