Publications by authors named "Irini Fragkiadoulaki"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Contrast-induced nephropathy: Basic concepts, pathophysiological implications and prevention strategies.

Pharmacol Ther 2017 Dec 19;180:99-112. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003, Greece.

Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is reversible acute renal failure observed following administration of iodinated contrast media (CM) during angiographic or other medical procedures such as urography. There are various mechanisms through which CM develop their nephrotoxic effects, including oxidative stress and apoptosis. CIN is a real-life, albeit not very rare, entity. Exact pathophysiology remains obscure and no standard diagnostic criteria apply. The Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria was recently employed but its incidence/clinical significance warrants further clarification based on recent methodological advancements, because most published studies to date were contaminated by bias. The current study is a comprehensive review conducted to provide an overview of the basic concepts of CIN and summarize recent knowledge on its pathophysiology and the evidence supporting potential prevention strategies. CIN is expected to increase morbidity, hospital stay and mortality, while all patients scheduled to receive CM should undergo risk assessment for CIN and high-risk patients may be considered candidates for prevention strategies. The value of using compounds with antioxidant properties other than sodium bicarbonate, remains controversial, warranting further clinical investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pharmthera.2017.06.009DOI Listing
December 2017

Telomerase activity in pregnancy complications (Review).

Mol Med Rep 2016 Jul 9;14(1):16-21. Epub 2016 May 9.

Center of Toxicology Science and Research, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003, Greece.

Telomeres are specific DNA regions positioned at the ends of chromosomes and composed of functional non-coding repeats. Upon cell division, the telomeres decrease in length by a preordained amount. When the telomeres become critically short, cells lose the ability to divide and enter a specific functioning mode designated as 'cellular senescence'. However, human tissues express an enzyme that deters the shrinking of the telomeres, the telomerase. Due to its ability to maintain telomere length, the telomerase slows down and possibly suspends the aging of the cells. In regard to this, solid evidence demonstrates that female human fertility decreases with increased maternal age and that various adverse factors, including alterations in telomerase activity, can contribute to age-associated infertility in women. The fact that telomerase activity is regulated in a time- and location-dependent manner in both embryo and placental tissues, highlights it potential importance to the successful completion of pregnancy. Since maternal age is a crucial determining factor for the success of in vitro and in vivo fertilization, numerous studies have focused on telomerase activity and its correlation with mammalian fertilization, as well as the following cleavage and pre-implantation developmental processes. Associations between telomerase activity and pregnancy complications have been previously observed. Our aim in this review was to summarize and critically discuss evidence correlating telomerase activity with pregnancy complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2016.5231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4918539PMC
July 2016