Publications by authors named "Irene Teichert-von Luettichau"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Children and Adults with Refractory Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Respond to Treatment with the Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Preparation "MSC-FFM"-Outcome Report of 92 Patients.

Cells 2019 12 5;8(12). Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Department for Children and Adolescents, Division for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany.

(1) Background: Refractory acute graft-versus-host disease (R-aGvHD) remains a leading cause of death after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Survival rates of 15% after four years are currently achieved; deaths are only in part due to aGvHD itself, but mostly due to adverse effects of R-aGvHD treatment with immunosuppressive agents as these predispose patients to opportunistic infections and loss of graft-versus-leukemia surveillance resulting in relapse. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from different tissues and those generated by various protocols have been proposed as a remedy for R-aGvHD but the enthusiasm raised by initial reports has not been ubiquitously reproduced. (2) Methods: We previously reported on a unique MSC product, which was generated from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of multiple third-party donors. The products showed dose-to-dose equipotency and greater immunosuppressive capacity than individually expanded MSCs from the same donors. This product, MSC-FFM, has entered clinical routine in Germany where it is licensed with a national hospital exemption authorization. We previously reported satisfying initial clinical outcomes, which we are now updating. The data were collected in our post-approval pharmacovigilance program, i.e., this is not a clinical study and the data is high-level and non-monitored. (3) Results: Follow-up for 92 recipients of MSC-FFM was reported, 88 with GvHD ≥°III, one-third only steroid-refractory and two-thirds therapy resistant (refractory to steroids plus ≥2 additional lines of treatment). A median of three doses of MSC-FFM was administered without apparent toxicity. Overall response rates were 82% and 81% at the first and last evaluation, respectively. At six months, the estimated overall survival was 64%, while the cumulative incidence of death from underlying disease was 3%. (4) Conclusions: MSC-FFM promises to be a safe and efficient treatment for severe R-aGvHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells8121577DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952775PMC
December 2019

Low incidence of symptomatic osteonecrosis after allogeneic HSCT in children with high-risk or relapsed ALL - results of the ALL-SCT 2003 trial.

Br J Haematol 2018 10 20;183(1):104-109. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Children's Cancer Research Institute (CCRI), St. Anna Kinderkrebsforschung, Vienna, Austria.

Osteonecrosis (ON) was prospectively assessed in 557 children and adolescents in the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Stem Cell Transplantation in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 2003 trial. Median age at haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was 10·3 years (range 0·5-26). Cumulative incidence of symptomatic ON (sON) was 9% at 5 years (standard deviation 1%), median time from HSCT to diagnosis of sON was 12·4 months (range 1-126). Multivariate analysis identified age at HSCT [10-15 years vs. <10 years: hazard ratio (HR) 3·73, P = 0·009; >15 years vs. <10 years: HR 5·46, P = 0·001], diagnosis of sON prior to HSCT and chronic graft-versus-host disease (yes versus no: HR 2·696, P = 0·015) as significant independent risk factors for the development of sON.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15511DOI Listing
October 2018

Transcriptome based individualized therapy of refractory pediatric sarcomas: feasibility, tolerability and efficacy.

Oncotarget 2018 Apr 17;9(29):20747-20760. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Pediatrics and Children's Cancer Research Center, Kinderklinik München Schwabing, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Fakultät für Medizin, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.

Survival rates of pediatric sarcoma patients stagnated during the last two decades, especially in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Targeted therapies offer new options in refractory cases. Gene expression profiling provides a robust method to characterize the transcriptome of each patient's tumor and guide the choice of therapy. Twenty patients with refractory pediatric sarcomas (age 8-35 years) were assessed with array profiling: ten had Ewing sarcoma, five osteosarcoma, and five soft tissue sarcoma. Overexpressed genes and deregulated pathways were identified as actionable targets and an individualized combination of targeted therapies was recommended. Disease status, survival, adverse events (AEs), and quality of life (QOL) were assessed in patients receiving targeted therapy (TT) and compared to patients without targeted therapy (non TT). Actionable targets were identified in all analyzed biopsies. Targeted therapy was administered in nine patients, while eleven received no targeted therapy. No significant difference in risk factors between these two groups was detected. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were significantly higher in the TT group (OS: P=0.0014, PFS: P=0.0011). Median OS was 8.83 versus 4.93 months and median PFS was 6.17 versus 1.6 months in TT versus non TT group, respectively. QOL did not differ at baseline as well as at four week intervals between the two groups. TT patients had less grade 1 AEs (P=0.009). The frequency of grade 2-4 AEs did not differ. Overall, expression based targeted therapy is a feasible and likely beneficial approach in patients with refractory pediatric sarcomas that warrants further study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.25087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945512PMC
April 2018

Improved 6-year overall survival in AT/RT - results of the registry study Rhabdoid 2007.

Cancer Med 2016 08 26;5(8):1765-75. Epub 2016 May 26.

Children's Hospital Augsburg, Swabian Children's Cancer Center, Stenglinstr. 2, 86156, Augsburg, Germany.

Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are characterized by mutations and subsequent inactivation of SMARCB1 (INI1, hSNF5), a predilection for very young children and an unfavorable outcome. The European Registry for rhabdoid tumors (EU-RHAB) was established to generate a common European database and to establish a standardized treatment regimen as the basis for phase I/II trials. Thus, genetic analyses, neuropathologic and radiologic diagnoses, and a consensus treatment regimen were prospectively evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, 31 patients with AT/RT from four countries were recruited into the registry study Rhabdoid 2007 and treated with systemic and intraventricular chemotherapy. Eight patients received high-dose chemotherapy, 23 radiotherapy, and 17 maintenance therapy. Reference evaluations were performed in 64% (genetic analyses, FISH, MLPA, sequencing) up to 97% (neuropathology, INI1 stain). Germ-line mutations (GLM) were detected in 6/21 patients. Prolonged overall survival was associated with age above 3 years, radiotherapy and achievement of a complete remission. 6-year overall and event-free survival rates were 46% (±0.10) and 45% (±0.09), respectively. Serious adverse events and one treatment-related death due to insufficiency of a ventriculo peritoneal shunt (VP-shunt) and consecutive herniation were noted. Acquisition of standardized data including reference diagnosis and a standard treatment schedule improved data quality along with a survival benefit. Treatment was feasible with significant but manageable toxicity. Although our analysis is biased due to heterogeneous adherence to therapy, EU-RHAB provides the best available basis for phase I/II clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.741DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4884635PMC
August 2016