Publications by authors named "Ira L Savetsky"

52 Publications

The Alar Equalization Suture for Nasal Tip Refinement.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2022 Jun 28. Epub 2022 Jun 28.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000009459DOI Listing
June 2022

Subcutaneous Lateral Temporal Lift.

Clin Plast Surg 2022 Jul 13;49(3):365-375. Epub 2022 May 13.

Northwell Health System/Hofstra University, Zucker School of Medicine, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 1009 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10028, USA. Electronic address:

Over the past decades, the understanding of the nuances of forehead anatomy and facial aging has grown immensely. Safe and reliable options for forehead rejuvenation followed. Although noninvasive techniques are an important adjunct in forehead rejuvenation, the mainstay of treatment of the eyebrow is operative intervention. The senior author's technique has developed over many years, first focusing on the open coronal and anterior hairline approach to the forehead lift, then the endoscopic brow lift, and most recently, the lateral subcutaneous temporal lift. This technique allows for reliable and safe elevation of the lateral brow with minimal complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cps.2022.02.001DOI Listing
July 2022

TGF-β1 mediates pathologic changes of secondary lymphedema by promoting fibrosis and inflammation.

Clin Transl Med 2022 Jun;12(6):e758

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Background: Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment, and previous studies have shown that the expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), a pro-fibrotic and anti-lymphangiogenic growth factor, is increased in this disease. Inhibition of TGF-β1 decreases the severity of the disease in mouse models; however, the mechanisms that regulate this improvement remain unknown.

Methods: Expression of TGF-β1 and extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) was assessed in biopsy specimens from patients with unilateral breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). The effects of TGF-β1 inhibition using neutralizing antibodies or a topical formulation of pirfenidone (PFD) were analyzed in mouse models of lymphedema. We also assessed the direct effects of TGF-β1 on lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) using transgenic mice that expressed a dominant-negative TGF-β receptor selectively on LECs (LEC ).

Results: The expression of TGF-β1 and ECM molecules is significantly increased in BCRL skin biopsies. Inhibition of TGF-β1 in mouse models of lymphedema using neutralizing antibodies or with topical PFD decreased ECM deposition, increased the formation of collateral lymphatics, and inhibited infiltration of T cells. In vitro studies showed that TGF-β1 in lymphedematous tissues increases fibroblast, lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC), and lymphatic smooth muscle cell stiffness. Knockdown of TGF-β1 responsiveness in LEC resulted in increased lymphangiogenesis and collateral lymphatic formation; however, ECM deposition and fibrosis persisted, and the severity of lymphedema was indistinguishable from controls.

Conclusions: Our results show that TGF-β1 is an essential regulator of ECM deposition in secondary lymphedema and that inhibition of this response is a promising means of treating lymphedema.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ctm2.758DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9160979PMC
June 2022

A Novel Algorithm for Defining the Mandibular Border.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2022 Mar;149(3):429e-432e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine.

Summary: Techniques for defining the mandibular angle are a particular focus for patients around the world. Developing the desirable sharp contours is a combination of reducing bulkiness around the mandible while augmenting the border. Invasive techniques (e.g., face lifts and chin augmentation) can help define the mandible; however, younger patients are demanding more affordable and less invasive procedures. The "Nefertiti lift," masseter neurotoxin, buccal fat excision, mandibular border augmentation with filler, and liposuction of the neck can all be done in the office and will produce excellent results. If the loss of definition is due to superior soft tissue, the next step is to determine if this is based on anterior or posterior soft-tissue excess. Posteriorly, it is caused by masseter hypertrophy, and anteriorly, it may be because of an enlarged or full buccal fat pad in the lower cheek area. If the loss of definition is inferior, the next step is to again define if it is anterior or posterior. Anterior excess tissue can be corrected with liposuction of the neck along with energy-based skin tightening technology. Posteriorly, the inferior pull of the platysma can be blunted with neurotoxin. Finally, once the soft tissues are adequate, the mandibular border can be augmented with filler. In this article, the authors propose an algorithm for when to utilize each of these procedures while reviewing proper technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008881DOI Listing
March 2022

The Five-Step Rhinoplasty Dead Space Closure Technique.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2022 Apr;149(4):679e-680e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: The creation of dead space in rhinoplasty creates a welcoming environment for erratic soft -tissue contraction. If rhinoplasty surgeons can control and reliably predict skin contraction and wound healing, rhinoplasty results will undoubtedly improve. Obliteration of dead space is a key component in rhinoplasty as it minimizes soft-tissue contraction, resulting in a more predictable outcome. In this article, the authors present a systematic five-step dead space closure surgical plan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008971DOI Listing
April 2022

An Update on the Surgical Management of the Bulbous and Boxy Tip.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2022 Jan;149(1):25e-27e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: The bulbous and box tips are two common morphologies encountered in rhinoplasty. Nasal tip reshaping is a challenging aspect of rhinoplasty. Understanding the classifications of nasal tip morphologies aids when performing a nasal-facial analysis. The management algorithm for both tip morphologies shares various techniques. These techniques include but are not limited to cephalic trim, transdomal sutures, and interdomal sutures. A graduated approach to managing the variations in bulbous and boxy tips will help in achieving consistent results. New concepts applied to the management include supporting alar rims with alar contour grafts, closing dead space through a series of techniques, and managing the soft-tissue envelope, which is often in excess.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008677DOI Listing
January 2022

Nasal Tip Shaping Finesse in Rhinoplasty.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Dec;148(6):1278-1279

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and Baylor College of Medicine.

Summary: Anatomic subtleties of the nasal tip have a dramatic impact on the overall appearance of the nose. Mastery of normal nasal aesthetics and anatomy is a critical prerequisite to adeptly performing nasal tip refinement during open rhinoplasty. This article and series of videos aim to provide a focused review of nasal tip analysis, anatomy, and surgical technique, with particular emphasis on pertinent tip sutures and cartilage grafts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008594DOI Listing
December 2021

Why Primary Rhinoplasty Fails.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Nov;148(5):1021-1027

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: Rhinoplasty remains one of the most challenging operations performed by plastic surgeons. The complexity lies in the ability to have a consistent and predictable aesthetic result. The unpredictability is mainly attributable to the interplay of manipulated internal structures and wound healing dynamics. In addition, setting realistic expectations with the patient is essential for achieving high postoperative patient satisfaction. An open rhinoplasty approach enables an accurate and in-depth evaluation and intervention. The authors provide a detailed analysis and discussion on why primary rhinoplasty fails, along with the surgical approach for preventing these failures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008494DOI Listing
November 2021

Evidence-Based Medicine in Plastic Surgery: From Then to Now.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Oct;148(4):645e-649e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; Baylor College of Medicine; Hansjorg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Health; and Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School.

Summary: Evidence-based medicine, as described by Dr. Sackett, is defined as the "conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence, combined with individual clinical expertise and patient preferences and values, in making decisions about the care of individual patients." In the late 2000s, seminal articles in Clinics in Plastic Surgery and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery introduced evidence-based medicine's role in plastic surgery and redefined varying levels of evidence. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons sponsored the Colorado Springs Evidence-Based Medicine Summit that set forth a consensus statement and action plan regarding the increased incorporation of evidence-based medicine into the field; this key meeting ushered a new era among plastic surgeons worldwide. Over the past decade, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery has incorporated evidence-based medicine into the Journal through an increase in articles with level I and II evidence, new sections of the Journal, and the introduction of validated tools to help authors perform prospective and randomized studies that ultimately  led to best practices used today. Plastic surgery is a specialty built on problem-solving and innovation, values starkly in-line with evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is becoming more ingrained in our everyday practice and plastic surgery culture; however, we must work actively to ensure that we continue this trend. In the next decade, we will possibly see that level I and II evidence articles start to inhabit many of our journal issues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008368DOI Listing
October 2021

Social Media Guidelines for Young Plastic Surgeons and Plastic Surgery Training Programs.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Aug;148(2):459-465

From private practice; the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine.

Summary: Social media are a powerful tool that creates a unique opportunity for the young plastic surgeon and trainee to share content, brand oneself, educate the public, and develop one's own professional voice early. The majority of all plastic surgery programs and particularly those that are highly ranked have social media opportunities for their residents, yet clear rules to guide implementation of social media programming in residency have remained unspecified. These guidelines and pitfalls can be used to inform a productive and professional entry into plastic surgery social media use for the resident and young plastic surgeon. Details regarding specific platform use to maximize exposure are provided. The core principles of patient safety and privacy, authentic photography, plastic surgery education and advocacy, and professionalism inform these guidelines. Pitfalls include establishment of an online physician-patient relationship, engaging in debate by means of online reviews, providing medical entertainment, and engaging in non-plastic surgery politics. Use of these guidelines will allow the young plastic surgeon and trainee to succeed by means of social media platforms in an ethical and professional manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008170DOI Listing
August 2021

The Role of the Buccal Fat Pad in Facial Aesthetic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Aug;148(2):334-338

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; the Institute of Aesthetic Medicine; the Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of General Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine; and Pontificia Universidad Javeriana.

Summary: Social media have triggered a buccal fat pad excision frenzy. Not surprisingly, there is tremendous appeal of having a slimmer lower face and more defined jawline after undergoing a small intraoral procedure under local anesthesia. Although this procedure is great for social media and seemingly beneficial for jawline aesthetics, the evidence remains limited as to whether or not this is an effective long-term solution. How much the buccal fat pad persists or diminishes as we age is an area of debate. However, the possibility of causing premature aging and midface distortion in the long run is disconcerting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008230DOI Listing
August 2021

Revisiting Primary Otoplasty: Surgical Approach to the Prominent Ear.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jul;148(1):28e-31e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute and the Hansjorg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Health.

Summary: Prominent ears and other ear deformities are some of the most common congenital deformities of the head, affecting over 10 percent of the general population. In 2018, more than 10,000 otoplasties were performed in the United States, with over one-third performed on men. The goal of primary otoplasty is creation of a normal-appearing ear without evidence of surgical intervention. This article and video detail the authors' preferred technique for the treatment of prominent ears. This novel method allows for reduction of a hypertrophic concha and obtuse conchoscaphal angle, as well as creation of an adequate antihelical fold.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008105DOI Listing
July 2021

Secondary Rhinoplasty for Unilateral Cleft Nasal Deformity.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jul;148(1):133-143

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute and private practice.

Background: Secondary cleft rhinoplasty presents some of the most challenging cases of both cosmetic and functional nasal deformities. Understanding the anatomy and growth abnormality seen with the cleft nasal deformity helps to tailor surgical management. This article seeks to expand on the application of current concepts in secondary rhinoplasty for unilateral cleft lip nasal deformity.

Methods: The authors review nasal analysis in the cleft rhinoplasty patient and provide the surgical management for each aspect in the secondary cleft rhinoplasty.

Results: The secondary rhinoplasty was divided into seven areas: piriform hypoplasia, septal reconstruction, dorsal reshaping, tip reshaping, tip projection, alar reshaping, and alar repositioning. Surgical management for each is provided.

Conclusion: Secondary cleft rhinoplasty requires an understanding of the structural dysmorphology, and the use of cosmetic, functional, and secondary rhinoplasty techniques for its successful management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008124DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8238436PMC
July 2021

Perioperative Approach to Reducing Hematoma during Rhytidectomy: What Does the Evidence Show?

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jun;147(6):1297-1309

From the Duke University Medical Center; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Background: Postoperative hematoma remains the most common complication in rhytidectomy, prompting surgeons to use a multitude of adjunctive measures to prevent its occurrence. The goal of this systematic review was to determine which of these measures are supported by strong evidence, and to highlight those that remain unsubstantiated and require further investigation.

Methods: A systematic search was performed of the PubMed and Embase databases for English literature from 1975 to March of 2020 containing designated keywords, and focusing specifically on adjunctive measures aimed at preventing hematoma in rhytidectomy. The resultant articles were then systematically screened according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria to determine eligibility for inclusion in the study.

Results: The keyword search yielded a total of 2391 articles. Title and abstract screening resulted in 103 articles that were eligible for full-text review. Ultimately, 48 articles met final inclusion criteria. The articles were categorized into their particular mode of intervention: fibrin tissue sealants, perioperative medications (anesthetics, antihypertensives, miscellaneous medications), and intraoperative maneuvers (hemostatic agents, preinfiltration, intraoperative maneuvers, and drains). Nine studies were indexed as evidence Level II and 24 as evidence Level III. The remainder of studies constituted Level IV evidence.

Conclusions: Adjunctive interventions have been borne out of necessity in efforts to reduce postoperative hematoma after rhytidectomy. Although many of these interventions have promising results, the current literature supports the senior author's (R.J.R.) experience that an evidence-based, multimodal approach is ideal to minimize the rates of hematoma after rhytidectomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007943DOI Listing
June 2021

Management of Patients with Textured Surface Breast Implants.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 04;147(4):607e-612e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center.

Summary: The purpose of this special topic article is to present an evidence-based approach and provide recommendations for the management of both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with textured surface breast implants. There are currently no scientific data to support complete removal of a benign capsule. When unnecessary capsulectomies are performed, the patient is at higher risk for developing postoperative complications. Ultimately, the decision to keep, exchange, or remove breast implants is the patient's decision and the procedure should be performed only by a qualified surgeon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007750DOI Listing
April 2021

SMAS Advancement with Fat Enhancement (SAFE) Lift.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2021 Feb 1;9(2):e3364. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929536PMC
February 2021

Evidence-Based Innovations Driving the Future of Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1):258-261

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Duke University Medical Center.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007502DOI Listing
January 2021

Prediction of Facial Aging Using the Facial Fat Compartments.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1S-2):38S-42S

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: Facial aging is a multifactorial process governed by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impart a change to each component of the facial anatomy. Our understanding of the science of aging has evolved over the years. A recent and valuable addition to our understanding is the knowledge of both the superficial and deep facial fat compartments. The deep compartments provide structural support to the midface and the superficial fat compartments. Understanding the anatomy and the spectrum of their changes helps to tailor management options for facial rejuvenation. The authors present a review on facial aging as it relates to these fat compartments and provide a management algorithm based on the longitudinal changes seen during aging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007624DOI Listing
January 2021

Systematic Surgical Approach to Alar Base Surgery in Rhinoplasty.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 12;146(6):1259-1267

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern.

In an era with smartphone photography and social media (specifically, "selfies"), basal view aesthetics is becoming increasingly important. Achieving balance between the nasal base and the remainder of the nose and face while preserving or restoring external valve function are essential to a successful rhinoplasty. Without a systematic approach to the nasal base, it is more difficult to achieve an ideal outcome from both aesthetic and functional standpoints. This article outlines an organized and systematic approach to the nasal base, beginning with comprehensive nasofacial analysis. The authors continue by describing idealized basal view aesthetics and provide a treatment algorithm for common deformities that include alar flaring and a wide nasal base. The authors attempt to provide a comprehensive approach to the treatment of the nasal base by discussing the implications of treating columellar deformities, tip positioning, or alar-columellar discrepancies on the overall aesthetics of the lower third of the nose. Furthermore, technical considerations are given for common surgical maneuvers addressing the alar base to help guide treatment and prevent complications such as poor scarring, notching, nostril asymmetry or stenosis (external valve obstruction), and alar deformities ("parenthesis" or "bowling pin"), to name a few.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007385DOI Listing
December 2020

Surgical Management of the Explant Patient: An Update on Options for Breast Contouring and Volume Restoration.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 11;146(5):978-985

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center.

Background: Breast implant removal is becoming a common procedure in light of the current events and controversies with silicone breast implants. The authors believe strongly in informing patients about the indications and options regarding both explantation and the management of the secondary breast deformity.

Methods: Relevant literature regarding the management of the explant patient was reviewed and organized to provide an update on prior publications addressing the explant patient population.

Results: Surgical management options after implant removal include breast contouring and volume restoration. Fat augmentation has been used in both aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery.

Conclusions: The authors review the surgical management for explantation, breast contouring, and autologous fat grafting for volume restoration. In the explant patient, autologous fat grafting serves as a reliable option for volume restoration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007288DOI Listing
November 2020

The Role of the Septal Extension Graft.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 May 26;8(5):e2710. Epub 2020 May 26.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002710DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7572184PMC
May 2020

The Left-handed Plastic Surgery Trainee: Perspectives and Recommendations.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 May 21;8(5):e2686. Epub 2020 May 21.

Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Health, New York, N.Y.

Left-handed surgeons experience difficulty with tools designed for use in the right hand. The purpose of this study was to examine instrument laterality and to survey the experiences of left-handed plastic surgery trainees.

Methods: Count sheets for plastic surgery trays (reconstructive, microsurgery, rhinoplasty, craniofacial) were acquired from Tisch Hospital, NYU Langone Health. Instruments with right-handed laterality were tallied. A survey was also distributed to plastic surgery residents and fellows to determine hand preference for surgical tasks, and those who identified as left-handed described how handedness impacted their training.

Results: Right-handed laterality was seen in 15 (31.3%) of the 48 reconstructive instruments, 17 (22.7%) of the 75 rhinoplasty instruments, and 22 (31.0%) of the 71 craniofacial instruments. One-hundred percent of the 25 microsurgery instruments were ambidextrous. There were 97 survey responses. Trainees (17.5%) were identified as left-handed and were more likely than right-handed trainees to report operating with both hands equally or with the opposite hand (47.1% versus 1.3%; < 0.001). Left-handed trainees were significantly more likely than right-handed trainees to use their nondominant hand with scissors ( < 0.001), electrocautery ( = 0.03), and needle drivers ( < 0.001) and when performing tissue dissection ( < 0.001) and microsurgery ( = 0.008). There was no difference in use of the nondominant hand between right and left-handed trainees for knot tying ( = 0.83) and in use of the scalpel ( = 0.41).

Conclusions: Left-handed plastic surgery trainees frequently encounter instruments designed for the nondominant hand, with which they adaptively perform several surgical tasks. Mentoring may help trainees overcome the laterality-related challenges of residency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7572112PMC
May 2020

Assessing Cosmetic Surgery Safety: The Evolving Data.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 May 13;8(5):e2643. Epub 2020 May 13.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002643DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7572219PMC
May 2020

Safety in the Use of Fillers in Nasal Augmentation-the Liquid Rhinoplasty.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Aug 18;8(8):e2820. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002820DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7489605PMC
August 2020

Our Collective Responsibility in Battling the Opioid Crisis.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 09;146(3):713-715

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007082DOI Listing
September 2020

The Five-step Lower Blepharoplasty Technique Refined.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Jul 14;8(7):e2717. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002717DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7413805PMC
July 2020

Effective Treatment of Platysma Bands with Neurotoxin.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Jun 23;8(6):e2812. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002812DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7339338PMC
June 2020

A Safe, Modern Treatment of Rhinophyma: The 5-Step Technique.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Jun 23;8(6):e2620. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002620DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7339328PMC
June 2020

Laser Resurfacing: Safety and Technique.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Apr 29;8(4):e2796. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000002796DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7209842PMC
April 2020

Cosmetic Surgery Safety: Putting the Scientific Data into Perspective.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 08;146(2):295-299

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Optimizing patient safety and outcomes remains at the forefront of cosmetic surgery today. The five most commonly performed procedures are breast augmentation, liposuction, rhinoplasty, blepharoplasty, and abdominoplasty. Safety of all cosmetic surgery is a necessity for its successful, continued practice. This article seeks to elucidate the current literature detailing the major and minor complication profiles of the five most practiced areas in cosmetic surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000006980DOI Listing
August 2020
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