Publications by authors named "Ingrid Hums"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Regulation of two motor patterns enables the gradual adjustment of locomotion strategy in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Elife 2016 05 25;5. Epub 2016 May 25.

Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna Biocenter VBC, Vienna, Austria.

In animal locomotion a tradeoff exists between stereotypy and flexibility: fast long-distance travelling (LDT) requires coherent regular motions, while local sampling and area-restricted search (ARS) rely on flexible movements. We report here on a posture control system in C. elegans that coordinates these needs. Using quantitative posture analysis we explain worm locomotion as a composite of two modes: regular undulations versus flexible turning. Graded reciprocal regulation of both modes allows animals to flexibly adapt their locomotion strategy under sensory stimulation along a spectrum ranging from LDT to ARS. Using genetics and functional imaging of neural activity we characterize the counteracting interneurons AVK and DVA that utilize FLP-1 and NLP-12 neuropeptides to control both motor modes. Gradual regulation of behaviors via this system is required for spatial navigation during chemotaxis. This work shows how a nervous system controls simple elementary features of posture to generate complex movements for goal-directed locomotion strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880447PMC
May 2016

EGL-13/SoxD specifies distinct O2 and CO2 sensory neuron fates in Caenorhabditis elegans.

PLoS Genet 2013 May 9;9(5):e1003511. Epub 2013 May 9.

Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Animals harbor specialized neuronal systems that are used for sensing and coordinating responses to changes in oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In Caenorhabditis elegans, the O2/CO2 sensory system comprises functionally and morphologically distinct sensory neurons that mediate rapid behavioral responses to exquisite changes in O2 or CO2 levels via different sensory receptors. How the diversification of the O2- and CO2-sensing neurons is established is poorly understood. We show here that the molecular identity of both the BAG (O2/CO2-sensing) and the URX (O2-sensing) neurons is controlled by the phylogenetically conserved SoxD transcription factor homolog EGL-13. egl-13 mutant animals fail to fully express the distinct terminal gene batteries of the BAG and URX neurons and, as such, are unable to mount behavioral responses to changes in O2 and CO2. We found that the expression of egl-13 is regulated in the BAG and URX neurons by two conserved transcription factors-ETS-5(Ets factor) in the BAG neurons and AHR-1(bHLH factor) in the URX neurons. In addition, we found that EGL-13 acts in partially parallel pathways with both ETS-5 and AHR-1 to direct BAG and URX neuronal fate respectively. Finally, we found that EGL-13 is sufficient to induce O2- and CO2-sensing cell fates in some cellular contexts. Thus, the same core regulatory factor, egl-13, is required and sufficient to specify the distinct fates of O2- and CO2-sensing neurons in C. elegans. These findings extend our understanding of mechanisms of neuronal diversification and the regulation of molecular factors that may be conserved in higher organisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003511DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3650002PMC
May 2013
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