Publications by authors named "Ines Martin"

10 Publications

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Natural history collections recapitulate 200 years of faunal change.

R Soc Open Sci 2021 Apr 14;8(4):201983. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Zoologisches Museum, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Hegewischstraße 3, 24105 Kiel, Germany.

Changing species assemblages represent major challenges to ecosystems around the world. Retracing these changes is limited by our knowledge of past biodiversity. Natural history collections represent archives of biodiversity and are therefore an unparalleled source to study biodiversity changes. In the present study, we tested the value of natural history collections for reconstructing changes in the abundance and presence of species over time. In total, we scrutinized 17 080 quality-checked records for 242 epibenthic invertebrate species from the North and Baltic Seas collected throughout the last 200 years. Our approaches identified eight previously reported species introductions, 10 range expansions, six of which are new to science, as well as the long-term decline of 51 marine invertebrate species. The cross-validation of our results with published accounts of endangered species and neozoa of the area confirmed the results for two of the approaches for 49 to 55% of the identified species, and contradicted our results for 9 to 10%. The results based on relative record trends were less validated. We conclude that, with the proper approaches, natural history collections are an unmatched resource for recovering early species introductions and declines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.201983DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059531PMC
April 2021

Follow-up of functional exercise capacity in patients with COVID-19: It is improved by telerehabilitation.

Respir Med 2021 07 30;183:106438. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Service de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium; Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique (IREC), Pôle de Pneumologie, ORL & Dermatologie, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; Secteur de Kinésithérapie et Ergothérapie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address:

Background: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on functional exercise capacity seemed quickly clinically evident. The objective of this study was to assess the functional exercise capacity of patients with severe COVID-19 and to evaluate the effect of a telerehabilitation program in the specific context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Method: Patients hospitalized for severe or critical COVID-19 were recruited. The functional exercise capacity (1-min sit-to-stand test (STST)) was prospectively quantified at discharge. A telerehabilitation program was then proposed. A control group was composed with the patients refusing the program.

Results: At discharge, none of the 48 recruited patients had a STST higher than the 50th percentile and 77% of them were below the 2.5th percentile. SpO2 was 92.6 ± 3.0% after STST and 15 patients had oxygen desaturation. After 3-months of follow-up, the number of repetitions during STST significantly increased either in telerehabilitation (n = 14) (p < 0.001) or in control groups (n = 13) (p = 0.002) but only one patient had a result higher than the 50th percentile (in Telerehabilitation group) and 37% of them were still under the 2.5th percentile for this result. The improvement was significantly and clinically greater after the telerehabilitation program (p = 0.005). No adverse events were reported by the patients during the program.

Conclusions: Patients hospitalized for COVID-19 have a low functional exercise capacity at discharge and the recovery after three months is poor. The feasibility and the effect of a simple telerehabilitation program were verified, this program being able to substantially improve the functional recovery after three months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2021.106438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084600PMC
July 2021

Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Seed Oil for Treating Menopausal Symptoms: An Individually Controlled Cohort Study.

Altern Ther Health Med 2017 Mar;23(2):28-34

Context • In the folk medicine of Mediterranean countries and in ancient Ayurveda, Punica granatum seeds (ie, pomegranate seeds) have been used for treatment of various disorders, including those that nowadays are classified as menopausal symptoms (MSs). Pomegranate seed oil (PSO) from those seeds mainly contains unsaturated fatty acids such as γ-linoleic acid and linolenic acid, but it also includes phytoestrogens. It is, therefore, regarded as a promising option for treating MSs today. Objectives • The study intended to investigate the safety and effectiveness of PSO as a defined P granatum seed oil for patients with MSs. Design • The research team designed an individually controlled, investigator-initiated cohort study. Setting • The treatments were performed at 2 institutions: (1) the Center for Complementary Medicine at the University Medical Center Freiburg (Freiburg, Germany); and (2) in the medical practice of H. Fischer (Freiburg, Germany). Participants • Seventy-eight patients, who had a mean duration of MSs of 46 mo, participated in the study. Intervention • After 4 wk without treatment, which functioned as a period providing an individual control, each participant took 1000 mg of PSO daily in 2 capsules for 8 wk. Outcome Measures • The symptom severity was scored on the German version of the menopausal rating scale (MRS) at baseline, after 4 wk without treatment, after 4 wk of treatment, and postintervention, with 0 = absence of symptoms and 4 = very strong symptoms. The efficacy and tolerability were estimated on scales from 0-4. Each participant's 17ß estradiol was determined at baseline and after postintervention using the patient's sera. The content of the β-sitosterol was determined in the PSO preparations by gas chromatography. Results • The content of β-sitosterol in the PSO used in the study was 6.3 mg/1000 mg. In the intention to treat analysis, most MRS symptoms were significantly and relevantly reduced (eg, hot flushes changed from 2.32 ± 1.04 to 1.41 ± 1.07, P < .001). Remarkably, urogenital tract symptoms (ie, a dry vagina) also significantly improved, moving from 1.32 ± 1.43 to 0.85 ± 1.19, P < .001. Few patients reported gastrointestinal symptoms. The tolerability was excellent at 3.69 ± 0.71 after 4 wk of treatment and 3.71 ± 0.65 after 8 wk of treatment. The 17ß estradiol was unchanged. Conclusions • Participants showed significant improvements in all domains of the MRS, remarkably including the difficult-to-treat urogenital symptoms. No changes occurred in the 17ß-estradiol in patients' sera after the PSO treatment. The results are promising and encourage the investigation of PSO rich in β-sitosterol for treatment of MSs in placebo-controlled studies.
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March 2017

Active multi-point microrheology of cytoskeletal networks.

Beilstein J Nanotechnol 2016 24;7:484-91. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

Institute of Experimental Physics, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

Active microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. Observing the response of the beads to the excitation of a reference leads to dynamic and morphological information of the material. In this work we present an expansion of the well-known active two-point microrheology. By measuring the response of multiple particles in a viscoelastic medium in response to the excitation of a reference particle, we are able to determine the force propagation in the polymer network. For this purpose a lock-in technique is established that allows for extraction of the periodical motion of embedded beads. To exert a sinusoidal motion onto the reference bead an optical tweezers setup in combination with a microscope is used to investigate the motion of the response beads. From the lock-in data the so called transfer tensor can be calculated, which is a direct measure for the ability of the network to transmit mechanical forces. We also take a closer look at the influence of noise on lock-in measurements and state some simple rules for improving the signal-to-noise ratio.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3762/bjnano.7.42DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4901545PMC
June 2016

Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

J Struct Biol 2016 06 31;194(3):415-22. Epub 2016 Mar 31.

Institute of General Physiology, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2016.03.023DOI Listing
June 2016

Prevalence of Stable Angina in Spain. Results of the OFRECE Study.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2015 Aug 17;68(8):691-9. Epub 2015 Feb 17.

Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.

Introduction And Objectives: The objective of the OFRECE study was to estimate the prevalence of stable angina in Spain. This prevalence is currently unknown, due to a lack of recent studies and to changes in the epidemiology and treatment of ischemic heart disease.

Methods: This cross-sectional study involved a representative sample of the Spanish population aged 40 years or older, obtained via 2-stage random sampling: in the first stage, primary care physicians were randomly selected from each Spanish province, whereas in the second stage 20 people were selected from the population assigned to each physician. The prevalence was weighted by age, sex, and geographical area. Participants were classified as having angina if they met the "definite angina" criteria of the Rose questionnaire and as having confirmed angina if the angina was confirmed by a cardiologist or if they had a history of acute ischemic heart disease or revascularization.

Results: Of the 11 831 people invited to participate, 8378 (71%) were analyzed (mean age, 59.2 years). The weighted prevalence of definite angina (Rose) was 2.6% (95% confidence interval, 2.1%-3.1%) and was higher in women (2.9%) than in men (2.2%), whereas that of confirmed angina was 1.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.0%-1.8%), without differences between men (1.5%) and women (1.3%). The prevalence of definite angina (Rose) increased with age (0.7% in patients aged 40 to 49 years and 7.1% in those aged 70 years or older), history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors, except smoking.

Conclusions: The prevalence of definite angina (Rose) in the Spanish population aged 40 years or older was 2.6%, whereas that of confirmed angina was 1.4%. Both prevalences increased with age, cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiovascular history.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2014.09.020DOI Listing
August 2015

Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in Spain. OFRECE study results.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2014 Apr 25;67(4):259-69. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.

Introduction And Objectives: Atrial fibrillation is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and both its incidence and prevalence are high. Nevertheless, comprehensive data on this condition in Spain are lacking. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in Spain.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the general Spanish population older than 40 years. Two-stage random sampling was used, in which first-stage units were primary care physicians randomly selected in every Spanish province and second-stage units were 20 randomly selected persons drawn from each participating physician's assigned population. The reported prevalence was standardized for the age and sex distribution of the Spanish population. The electrocardiogram recordings were read centrally.

Results: Overall, 8343 individuals were evaluated. The mean age was 59.2 years (95% confidence interval, 58.6-59.8 years), and 52.4% of the participants were female. The overall age-adjusted prevalence of atrial fibrillation was 4.4% (95% confidence interval, 3.8-5.1). Prevalence was similar in both sexes, men 4.4% (3.6-5.2) and women 4.5% (3.6-5.3), rising with increasing age older than 60 years. In patients older than 80 years, the prevalence was 17.7% (14.1-21.3). In 10% of patients an unknown atrial fibrillation was diagnosed.

Conclusions: The prevalence of atrial fibrillation in the general Spanish population older than 40 years is high, at 4.4%. The prevalence is similar in both sexes and rises steeply above 60 years of age. It is estimated that there are over 1 million patients with atrial fibrillation in the Spanish population, of whom over 90,000 are undiagnosed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2013.07.014DOI Listing
April 2014

Use of a laparoscopic retrieval device for urolith removal through a perineal urethrotomy.

Vet Surg 2012 Jul 1;41(5):629-33. Epub 2012 Mar 1.

Servicio de Cirugía Equina Hospital Clínico Veterinario Universidad Alfonso X el Sabio Avenida de la Universidad N°1 CP: 28691, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid, Spain.

Objective: To report the use of a laparoscopic retrieval device for removal of uroliths via a perineal urethrotomy.

Study Design: Case report.

Animals: A 12-year-old Konenklijk Warmbloed Paardenstamboek Nederland (KWPN) gelding and a 15-year-old Holsteiner gelding.

Methods: Perineal urethrotomy was performed on 2 standing sedated geldings and the urolith was removed using a laparoscopic retrieval device.

Results: In both cases, uroliths were removed successfully with no short- or long-term complications. The larger of the 2 uroliths measured 6 cm in length and 4.6 cm in width.

Conclusions: Removal of a urolith via a perineal urethrotomy using a laparoscopic retrieval device was an expedient and minimally traumatic method that obviated the need for fragmentation before removal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.00967.xDOI Listing
July 2012

Glucocerebrosidase mutations confer a greater risk of dementia during Parkinson's disease course.

Mov Disord 2012 Mar 15;27(3):393-9. Epub 2011 Dec 15.

Neurology Department. Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene are associated with Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia. However, whether these alterations have any effect on the clinical course of Parkinson's disease is not clear. The glucocerebrosidase coding region was fully sequenced in 225 Parkinson's disease patients, 17 pathologically confirmed Lewy body dementia patients, and 186 controls from Spain. Twenty-two Parkinson's disease patients (9.8%) and 2 Lewy body dementia patients (11.8%) carried mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene, compared with only 1 control (0.5%); P = .016 and P = .021 for Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia, respectively. The N370S and the L444P mutations represented 50% of the alterations. Two novel variants, L144V and S488T, and 7 previously described alterations were also found. Alterations in glucocerebrosidase were associated with a significant risk of dementia during the clinical course of Parkinson's disease (age at onset, years of evolution, and sex-adjusted odds ratio, 5.8; P = .001). Mutation carriers did not show worse motor symptoms, had good response to L-dopa, and tended to present the intermediate parkinsonian phenotype. Our findings suggest that mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene not only increase the risk of both Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia but also strongly influence the course of Parkinson's disease with respect to the appearance of dementia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.24045DOI Listing
March 2012

Purification and characterization of a cysteine endopeptidase from Vasconcellea quercifolia A. St.-Hil. latex displaying high substrate specificity.

J Agric Food Chem 2010 Oct 28;58(20):11027-35. Epub 2010 Sep 28.

Laboratorio de Investigación de Proteínas Vegetales (LIPROVE), Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 711, B1900AVW, La Plata, Argentina.

A new proteolytic preparation from Vasconcellea quercifolia ("oak leaved papaya") latex containing several cysteine endopeptidases with high proteolytic activity has been obtained. The specific activity of the new enzymatic preparation (VQ) was higher than that of Carica papaya latex. VQ was able to coagulate milk and to hydrolyze caseins and then could be used to produce cheeses and/or casein hydrolysates. Ion exchange chromatography of VQ allowed the isolation of a new protease, named quercifoliain I, homogeneous when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, IEF and MALDI-TOF-MS. Molecular mass was 24195 Da, and its isoelectric point was >9.3. The N-terminal sequence was determined (YPESVDWRQ). Insulin B-chain cleavage showed higher specificity than that of papain and was restricted to glycyl and alanyl residues at P1' position. The tryptic peptide mass fingerprint of quercifoliain I analyzed with the MASCOT search tool did not find a match with papain or any other plant cysteine proteases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf904295xDOI Listing
October 2010