Publications by authors named "Ineke A van Rossum"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Novel Methods for Quantification of Vasodepression and Cardioinhibition During Tilt-Induced Vasovagal Syncope.

Circ Res 2020 08 28;127(5):e126-e138. Epub 2020 May 28.

Cardiovascular Division, Arrhythmia Center, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (D.G.B.).

Rationale: Assessing the relative contributions of cardioinhibition and vasodepression to the blood pressure (BP) decrease in tilt-induced vasovagal syncope requires methods that reflect BP physiology accurately.

Objective: To assess the relative contributions of cardioinhibition and vasodepression to tilt-induced vasovagal syncope using novel methods.

Methods And Results: We studied the parameters determining BP, that is, stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), and total peripheral resistance (TPR), in 163 patients with tilt-induced vasovagal syncope documented by continuous ECG and video EEG monitoring. We defined the beginning of cardioinhibition as the start of an HR decrease (HR) before syncope and used logarithms of SV, HR, and TPR ratios to quantify the multiplicative relation BP=SV·HR·TPR. We defined 3 stages before syncope and 2 after it based on direction changes of these parameters. The earliest BP decrease occurred 9 minutes before syncope. Cardioinhibition was observed in 91% of patients at a median time of 58 seconds before syncope. At that time, SV had a strong negative effect on BP, TPR a lesser negative effect, while HR had increased (all <0.001). At the onset of cardioinhibition, the median HR was at 98 bpm higher than baseline. Cardioinhibition thus initially only represented a reduction of the corrective HR increase but was nonetheless accompanied by an immediate acceleration of the ongoing BP decrease. At syncope, SV and HR contributed similarly to the BP decrease (<0.001), while TPR did not affect BP.

Conclusions: The novel methods allowed the relative effects of SV, HR, and TPR on BP to be assessed separately, although all act together. The 2 major factors lowering BP in tilt-induced vasovagal syncope were reduced SV and cardioinhibition. We suggest that the term vasodepression in reflex syncope should not be limited to reduced arterial vasoconstriction, reflected in TPR, but should also encompass venous pooling, reflected in SV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.120.316662DOI Listing
August 2020

Timing of Circulatory and Neurological Events in Syncope.

Front Cardiovasc Med 2020 13;7:36. Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, Netherlands.

Syncope usually lasts less than a minute, in which short time arterial blood pressure temporarily falls enough to decrease brain perfusion so much that loss of consciousness ensues. Blood pressure decreases quickest when the heart suddenly stops pumping, which happens in arrhythmia and in severe cardioinhibitory reflex syncope. Loss of consciousness starts about 8 s after the last heart beat and circulatory standstill occurs after 10-15 s. A much slower blood pressure decrease can occur in syncope due to orthostatic hypotension Standing blood pressure can then stabilize at low values often causing more subtle signs (i.e., inability to act) but often not low enough to cause loss of consciousness. Cerebral autoregulation attempts to keep cerebral blood flow constant when blood pressure decreases. In reflex syncope both the quick blood pressure decrease and its low absolute value mean that cerebral autoregulation cannot prevent syncope. It has more protective value in orthostatic hypotension. Neurological signs are related to the severity and timing of cerebral hypoperfusion. Several unanswered pathophysiological questions with possible clinical implications are identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2020.00036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082775PMC
March 2020

Measurements of medial temporal lobe atrophy for prediction of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

Neurobiol Aging 2013 Aug 27;34(8):2003-13. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Center Limburg, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Our aim was to compare the predictive accuracy of 4 different medial temporal lobe measurements for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Manual hippocampal measurement, automated atlas-based hippocampal measurement, a visual rating scale (MTA-score), and lateral ventricle measurement were compared. Predictive accuracy for AD 2 years after baseline was assessed by receiver operating characteristics analyses with area under the curve as outcome. Annual cognitive decline was assessed by slope analyses up to 5 years after baseline. Correlations with biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated. Subjects with MCI were selected from the Development of Screening Guidelines and Clinical Criteria for Predementia AD (DESCRIPA) multicenter study (n = 156) and the single-center VU medical center (n = 172). At follow-up, area under the curve was highest for automated atlas-based hippocampal measurement (0.71) and manual hippocampal measurement (0.71), and lower for MTA-score (0.65) and lateral ventricle (0.60). Slope analysis yielded similar results. Hippocampal measurements correlated with CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau, not with beta-amyloid 1-42. MTA-score and lateral ventricle volume correlated with CSF beta-amyloid 1-42. We can conclude that volumetric hippocampal measurements are the best predictors of AD conversion in subjects with MCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.02.002DOI Listing
August 2013

Prediction of Alzheimer disease in subjects with amnestic and nonamnestic MCI.

Neurology 2013 Mar 27;80(12):1124-32. Epub 2013 Feb 27.

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Center Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Objective: To compare the predictive accuracy of β-amyloid (Aβ)1-42 and total tau in CSF, hippocampal volume (HCV), and APOE genotype for Alzheimer disease (AD)-type dementia in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment (naMCI).

Methods: We selected 399 subjects with aMCI and 226 subjects with naMCI from a multicenter memory clinic-based cohort. We measured CSF Aβ1-42 and tau by ELISA (n = 231), HCV on MRI (n = 388), and APOE ε4 (n = 523). Follow-up was performed annually up to 5 years. Outcome measures were progression to AD-type dementia and cognitive decline.

Results: At least 1 follow-up was available for 538 subjects (86%). One hundred thirty-two subjects with aMCI (38%) and 39 subjects with naMCI (20%) progressed to AD-type dementia after an average follow-up of 2.5 years. CSF Aβ1-42, tau, Aβ1-42/tau ratio, HCV, and APOE ε4 predicted AD-type dementia in each MCI subgroup with the same overall diagnostic accuracy. However, CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was higher and hippocampal atrophy less severe in subjects with naMCI compared with aMCI. This reduced the sensitivity but increased the specificity of these markers for AD-type dementia in subjects with naMCI.

Conclusions: AD biomarkers are useful to predict AD-type dementia in subjects with aMCI and naMCI. However, biomarkers might not be as sensitive for early diagnosis of AD in naMCI compared with aMCI. This may have implications for clinical implementation of the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association criteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318288690cDOI Listing
March 2013

Injury markers predict time to dementia in subjects with MCI and amyloid pathology.

Neurology 2012 Oct 26;79(17):1809-16. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Objectives: Alzheimer disease (AD) can now be diagnosed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using biomarkers. However, little is known about the rate of decline in those subjects. In this cohort study, we aimed to assess the conversion rate to dementia and identify prognostic markers in subjects with MCI and evidence of amyloid pathology.

Methods: We pooled subjects from the VU University Medical Center Alzheimer Center and the Development of Screening Guidelines and Criteria for Predementia Alzheimer's Disease (DESCRIPA) study. We included subjects with MCI, an abnormal level of β-amyloid(1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) in the CSF, and at least one diagnostic follow-up visit. We assessed the effect of APOE genotype, CSF total tau (t-tau) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) and hippocampal volume on time to AD-type dementia using Cox proportional hazards models and on decline on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) using linear mixed models.

Results: We included 110 subjects with MCI with abnormal CSF Aβ(1-42) and a mean MMSE score of 26.3 ± 2.8. During a mean follow-up of 2.2 ± 1.0 (range 0.4-5.0) years, 63 subjects (57%) progressed to AD-type dementia. Abnormal CSF t-tau (hazard ratio [HR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.6, p = 0.03) and CSF p-tau (HR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-9.2, p = 0.01) concentration and hippocampal atrophy (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.6, p = 0.02) predicted time to dementia. For subjects with both abnormal t-tau concentration and hippocampal atrophy, HR was 7.3 (95% CI 1.0-55.9, p = 0.06). Furthermore, abnormal CSF t-tau and p-tau concentrations and hippocampal atrophy predicted decline in MMSE score.

Conclusions: In subjects with MCI and evidence of amyloid pathology, the injury markers CSF t-tau and p-tau and hippocampal atrophy can predict further cognitive decline.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182704056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3475623PMC
October 2012

Injury markers but not amyloid markers are associated with rapid progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

J Alzheimers Dis 2012 ;29(2):319-27

Department of Neurology/Alzheimer Center, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common cause of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the time between the diagnosis of MCI and the diagnosis of dementia is highly variable. In this study we investigated which known risk factors and biomarkers of AD pathology were associated with rapid progression from MCI to dementia. Of the 203 subjects with MCI, 91 progressed to AD-type dementia and were considered to have MCI-AD at baseline. Subjects with MCI-AD were older, more frequently female and carrier of the APOE-ε4 allele, had lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), more medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and lower levels of Aβ1-42 and increased levels of t-tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to subjects without AD-type dementia at follow up. Of the 91 subjects with MCI-AD, we had data available of CSF (n = 56), MTA (n = 76), and APOE-genotype (n = 63). Among the subjects with MCI-AD, MTA (hazard ratio (HR) 2.2, p = 0.004) and low MMSE score (HR 2.0 p = 0.007) were associated with rapid progression to dementia. High CSF t-tau (HR 1.7, p = 0.07) and p-tau (1.7, p = 0.08) tended to be associated with rapid progression to dementia. CSF Aβ1-42, APOE status, age, gender, and educational level were not associated with time to dementia. Our findings implicate a different role for biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis of MCI-AD. While amyloid markers can be used to identify MCI-AD, injury markers may predict rapid progression to dementia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2011-111694DOI Listing
July 2012

[Unexceptional symptoms as expression of MELAS].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2010 ;154:A2168

Medisch Centrum Alkmaar, Afd. Neurologie, The Netherlands.

An 11-year-old girl and a 25-year-old woman were both initially referred to a neurologist with 'common' neurological problems: The girl suffered from tics, and later epilepsy, and her serum lactate concentration was elevated. She had unilateral hyperintensity of the left cerebral cortex and later developed diabetes mellitus. The woman had muscle weakness, diabetes mellitus and ptosis. In both patients, the problems turned out to be an expression of MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). The first patient died at 18 years of age during an epileptic seizure with severe metabolic disturbances. The second patient developed bilateral perceptive hearing loss, epilepsy and cardiomyopathy and she was repeatedly admitted to hospital with stroke-like episodes. She died at 46 years of age. Both patients had the MELAS A3243G point mutation. MELAS is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder. The age of onset and symptoms are highly variable, even within one family. To date there are no curative treatment options for the disease. Diagnosing MELAS is important though, for optimising the treatment of the individual symptoms and genetic counselling.
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December 2010

Biomarkers as predictors for conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer-type dementia: implications for trial design.

J Alzheimers Dis 2010 ;20(3):881-91

Alzheimer Centre, Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are likely to be most effective when given in non-demented subjects. In this review we summarized biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood that can predict AD-type dementia in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, we investigated whether these markers could reduce sample size and costs if used to select subjects for trials on the prevention of AD in subjects with MCI. A meta-analysis of markers that had been investigated in multiple studies showed that the combination of amyloid-beta (Abeta1-42 and tau in CSF had the best predictive accuracy for AD (odds ratio (OR) 18.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.6-32.4). Abeta1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau in CSF also predicted conversion, but with lower accuracy (OR 7.5 to 8.1). Plasma levels of Abeta1-40, Abeta1-42, the ratio Abeta1-42/Abeta1-40 and homocysteine did not predict outcome. In a fictive trial design, the use of the combination of Abeta1-42 and tau in CSF in the selection of subjects could reduce sample size by 67% and trial costs by 60% compared to a trial in which unselected subjects with MCI would be enrolled. In conclusion, the combination of Abeta1-42 and tau in CSF is useful to select subjects for trials that aim to slow down the progression from MCI to AD-type dementia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2010-091606DOI Listing
September 2010
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