Publications by authors named "Indre Petraitiene"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sex Hormones, Gonad Size, and Metabolic Profile in Adolescent Girls Born Small for Gestational Age with Catch-up Growth.

J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol 2020 Apr 7;33(2):125-132. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Department of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania; Institute of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Study Objective: To characterize and compare sex hormone concentrations, and uterine and ovarian volumes in adolescent girls born small for gestational age (SGA) who had experienced catch-up growth and girls born at a size appropriate for gestational age (AGA), and to investigate the association between these parameters and glucose metabolism, perinatal factors, and early growth.

Design: A prospective, longitudinal, observational study from birth until adolescence.

Setting: Mean age at final assessment was 12.7 ± 0.1 years.

Participants: We followed 55 girls (20 SGA, 35 AGA).

Interventions And Main Outcome Measures: Sex hormone concentrations (gonadotropins, estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin) were analyzed, and the oral glucose tolerance test conducted. Uterine and ovarian sizes were assessed using pelvic ultrasound.

Results: Uterine and ovarian volumes were smaller in SGA-born compared with AGA-born girls (P = .013 and P = .039, respectively). SGA girls had lower sex hormone binding globulin levels (P = .039) and higher testosterone levels (P = .003), free androgen index (P < .001), and glycemia 2 hours post glucose load (P = .005) compared with AGA-born girls. Birth weight and early infancy height velocity explained 37.4% of variation in ovarian volume (P = .004), and body mass index at birth, increase in peripheral skinfold thickness during second year of life, and early childhood height velocity explained 43.2% of variation in testosterone levels in adolescence (P = .006).

Conclusion: SGA-born girls who experienced catch-up growth remain at risk of biochemical hyperandrogenism in adolescence, and have reduced uterine and ovarian volumes, which might influence future reproductive function. Ovarian size and androgen levels in adolescence might be influenced by early growth and subcutaneous fat deposition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpag.2019.11.001DOI Listing
April 2020

Adrenal Function in Adolescence is Related to Intrauterine and Postnatal Growth.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2019 May 20;55(5). Epub 2019 May 20.

Department of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania.

Intrauterine growth restriction is thought to be implicated in long-term programming of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. We investigated adrenal function in adolescents born small for gestational age (SGA) in relation to their postnatal growth and cardiovascular parameters. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, heart rate, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and cortisol levels were assessed in 102 adolescents aged 11-14 years followed from birth (47 SGA and 55 born appropriate for gestational age (AGA)). Mean DHEAS levels were higher in SGA adolescents with catch-up growth (SGA), compared with AGA. Second-year height velocity and body mass index (BMI) gain during preschool years were positively related to DHEAS levels. Morning cortisol levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were higher in SGA adolescents without catch-up growth (SGA) compared with AGA. Second-year BMI gain was inversely, and 2-12 years increase in subscapular skinfold thickness was directly associated with cortisol levels. Size at birth and postnatal growth explained 47.8% and 38.2% of variation in DHEAS and cortisol levels, respectively. Adrenal function in adolescence is affected by prenatal and postnatal growth: small size at birth with postnatal catch-up growth is related to higher DHEAS secretion, whereas increased cortisol levels and blood pressure are higher in short SGA adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina55050167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6571974PMC
May 2019

Congenital hyperinsulinism.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2014 13;50(3):190-5. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Institute of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Hyperinsulinism is the most common cause of hypoglycemia in infants. In many cases conservative treatment is not effective and surgical intervention is required. Differentiation between diffuse and focal forms and localization of focal lesions are the most important issues in preoperative management. We present a case of persistent infancy hyperinsulinism. Clinical presentation, conservative treatment modalities, diagnostic possibilities of focal and diffuse forms, and surgical treatment, which led to total recovery, are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.medici.2014.08.006DOI Listing
August 2016

Puberty in children born small for gestational age.

Horm Res Paediatr 2013 26;80(2):69-77. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

Institute of Endocrinology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Small for gestational age (SGA) children are more prone to have precocious pubarche and exaggerated precocious adrenarche, an earlier onset of pubertal development and menarche, and faster progression of puberty than children born of appropriate for gestational age (AGA) size. The majority of studies investigating the onset of puberty in children born SGA and AGA established that, although puberty begins at an appropriate time (based on chronological age and actual height) in SGA children, onset is earlier relative to AGA children. Evaluating pubertal growth in SGA children, a more modest bone age delay from chronological age at the onset of puberty and more rapid bone maturation during puberty compared to AGA children were reported. Peak height velocity in adolescence is reached at an earlier pubertal stage and lasts for a shorter period in children born SGA than in those born AGA. These differences lead to an earlier fusion of the growth plates and a shorter adult height. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the unique pubertal growth pattern of children born SGA remains unclear. However, it seems that this is not only related to birth weight, gestational age, adiposity or obesity, but that there may also be an influence of rapid weight gain in early childhood on pubertal onset: excess weight gain in childhood may be related to central adiposity, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased IGF-I levels and might thus predispose to precocious pubarche.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000353759DOI Listing
March 2014
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