Publications by authors named "In-Su Choi"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The complete plastid genome sequence of (Fagaceae), an evergreen broad-leaved oak endemic to East Asia.

Mitochondrial DNA B Resour 2021 Feb 3;6(2):320-322. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Department of Biology Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

We are reporting the complete plastid genome (plastome) of , an evergreen broad-leaved oak endemic to East Asia. This species is important for maintaining the warm-temperate evergreen forest biome in East Asia. The plastome is 160,522 base pairs (bp) long, with two inverted repeat (IR) regions (25,839 bp each) that separate a large single copy (LSC) region (90,199 bp) and a small single copy (SSC) region (18,645 bp). The phylogenetic tree shows that is closely related to with strong bootstrap support.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23802359.2020.1866449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7872549PMC
February 2021

Caught in the Act: Variation in plastid genome inverted repeat expansion within and between populations of .

Ecol Evol 2020 Nov 29;10(21):12129-12137. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Integrative Biology The University of Texas at Austin Austin Texas USA.

The inverted repeat (IR) lacking clade (IRLC) is a monophyletic group within the Papilionoideae subfamily of Fabaceae where plastid genomes (plastomes) do not contain the large IR typical of land plants. Recently, an IRLC legume, , was found to have regrown a ~9 kb IR that contained a number of canonical IR genes, and closely related contained an incomplete IR of ~425 bp. Complete plastomes were generated for seven additional species, putative members of the clade. Polymerase chain reaction was employed to investigate the presence of the IR across and including individuals of nine and eight Eurasian and North African accessions and 15 and 14 Texas populations, respectively. While no sequence similar to the ~9 kb IR was detected among the seven newly sequenced plastomes, all Eurasian and North African accessions of contained the IR. Variation in IR extent was detected within and between the Texas populations. Expansions of 13 bp and 11 bp occurred at the boundaries of both IR/small single-copy regions, and populations had one or the other expansion, but not both. Expansion of the IR was not detected in the accessions from Eurasia and North Africa suggesting recent mutations yielded at least two additional plastid haplotypes in .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.6839DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7663068PMC
November 2020

A Disjunctive Marginal Edge of Evergreen Broad-Leaved Oak () in East Asia: The High Genetic Distinctiveness and Unusual Diversity of Jeju Island Populations and Insight into a Massive, Independent Postglacial Colonization.

Genes (Basel) 2020 Sep 23;11(10). Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Department of Biology Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.

Jeju Island is located at a marginal edge of the distributional range of East Asian evergreen broad-leaved forests. The low genetic diversity of such edge populations is predicted to have resulted from genetic drift and reduced gene flow when compared to core populations. To test this hypothesis, we examined the levels of genetic diversity of marginal-edge populations of , restricted to a few habitats on Jeju Island, and compared them with the southern Kyushu populations. We also evaluated their evolutionary potential and conservation value. The genetic diversity and structure were analyzed using 40 polymorphic microsatellite markers developed in this study. Ecological Niche Modeling (ENM) has been employed to develop our insights, which can be inferred from historical distribution changes. Contrary to our expectations, we detected a similar level of genetic diversity in the Jeju populations, comparable to that of the southern Kyushu populations, which have been regarded as long-term glacial refugia with a high genetic variability of East Asian evergreen trees. We found no signatures of recent bottlenecks in the Jeju populations. The results of STRUCTURE, neighbor-joining phylogeny, and Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) with a significant barrier clearly demonstrated that the Jeju and Kyushu regions are genetically distinct. However, ENM showed that the probability value for the distribution of the trees on Jeju Island during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) converge was zero. In consideration of these results, we hypothesize that independent massive postglacial colonization from a separate large genetic source, other than Kyushu, could have led to the current genetic diversity of Jeju Island. Therefore, we suggest that the Jeju populations deserve to be separately managed and designated as a level of management unit (MU). These findings improve our understanding of the paleovegetation of East Asian evergreen forests, and the microevolution of oaks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11101114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598624PMC
September 2020

Comparative Mitogenome Analysis of the Genus Reveals Independent Gene Fission of and Intracellular Gene Transfers in Fabaceae.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Mar 13;21(6). Epub 2020 Mar 13.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

The genus is the largest of the tribe Trifolieae in the subfamily Papilionoideae (Fabaceae). The paucity of mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences has hindered comparative analyses among the three genomic compartments of the plant cell (nucleus, mitochondrion and plastid). We assembled four mitogenomes from the two subgenera ( and ) of the genus. The four mitogenomes were compact (294,911-348,724 bp in length) and contained limited repetitive (6.6-8.6%) DNA. Comparison of organelle repeat content highlighted the distinct evolutionary trajectory of plastid genomes in a subset of species. Intracellular gene transfer (IGT) was analyzed among the three genomic compartments revealing functional transfer of mitochondrial to nuclear genome along with other IGT events. Phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial and nuclear sequences revealed that the functional transfer in Trifolieae was independent from the event that occurred in robinioid clade that includes genus . A novel, independent fission event of in was identified, caused by a 59 bp deletion. Fissions of this gene reported previously in land plants were reassessed and compared with .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21061959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7139807PMC
March 2020

Fluctuations in Fabaceae mitochondrial genome size and content are both ancient and recent.

BMC Plant Biol 2019 Oct 25;19(1):448. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712, USA.

Background: Organelle genome studies of Fabaceae, an economically and ecologically important plant family, have been biased towards the plastid genome (plastome). Thus far, less than 15 mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences of Fabaceae have been published, all but four of which belong to the subfamily Papilionoideae, limiting the understanding of size variation and content across the family. To address this, four mitogenomes were sequenced and assembled from three different subfamilies (Cercidoideae, Detarioideae and Caesalpinioideae).

Results: Phylogenetic analysis based on shared mitochondrial protein coding regions produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that was completely congruent with the plastome tree. Comparative analyses suggest that two kinds of mitogenome expansions have occurred in Fabaceae. Size expansion of four genera (Tamarindus, Libidibia, Haematoxylum, and Leucaena) in two subfamilies (Detarioideae and Caesalpinioideae) occurred in relatively deep nodes, and was mainly caused by intercellular gene transfer and/or interspecific horizontal gene transfer (HGT). The second, more recent expansion occurred in the Papilionoideae as a result of duplication of native mitochondrial sequences. Family-wide gene content analysis revealed 11 gene losses, four (rps2, 7, 11 and 13) of which occurred in the ancestor of Fabaceae. Losses of the remaining seven genes (cox2, rpl2, rpl10, rps1, rps19, sdh3, sdh4) were restricted to specific lineages or occurred independently in different clades. Introns of three genes (cox2, ccmFc and rps10) showed extensive lineage-specific length variation due to large sequence insertions and deletions. Shared DNA analysis among Fabaceae mitogenomes demonstrated a substantial decay of intergenic spacers and provided further insight into HGT between the mimosoid clade of Caesalpinioideae and the holoparasitic Lophophytum (Balanophoraceae).

Conclusion: This study represents the most exhaustive analysis of Fabaceae mitogenomes so far, and extends the understanding the dynamic variation in size and gene/intron content. The four newly sequenced mitogenomes reported here expands the phylogenetic coverage to four subfamilies. The family has experienced multiple mitogenome size fluctuations in both ancient and recent times. The causes of these size variations are distinct in different lineages. Fabaceae mitogenomes experienced extensive size fluctuation by recruitment of exogenous DNA and duplication of native mitochondrial DNA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-019-2064-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814987PMC
October 2019

Plastid genome evolution in tribe Desmodieae (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae).

PLoS One 2019 24;14(6):e0218743. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Michuhol-gu, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Recent plastid genome (plastome) studies of legumes (family Fabaceae) have shown that this family has undergone multiple atypical plastome evolutions from each of the major clades. The tribe Desmodieae belongs to the Phaseoloids, an important but systematically puzzling clade within Fabaceae. In this study, we investigated the plastome evolution of Desmodieae and analyzed its phylogenetic signaling. We sequenced six complete plastomes from representative members of Desmodieae and from its putative sister Phaseoloid genus Mucuna. Those genomes contain 128 genes and range in size from 148,450 to 153,826 bp. Analyses of gene and intron content revealed similar characters among the members of Desmodieae and Mucuna. However, there were also several distinct characters identified. The loss of the rpl2 intron was a feature shared between Desmodieae and Mucuna, whereas the loss of the rps12 intron was specific to Desmodieae. Likewise, gene loss of rps16 was observed in Mucuna but not in Desmodieae. Substantial sequence variation of ycf4 was detected from all the sequenced plastomes, but pseudogenization was restricted to the genus Desmodium. Comparative analysis of gene order revealed a distinct plastome conformation of Desmodieae compared with other Phaseoloid legumes, i.e., an inversion of an approximately 1.5-kb gene cluster (trnD-GUC, trnY-GUA, and trnE-UUC). The inversion breakpoint suggests that this event was mediated by the recombination of an 11-bp repeat motif. A phylogenetic analysis based on the plastome-scale data set found the tribe Desmodieae is a highly supported monophyletic group nested within the paraphyletic Phaseoleae, as has been found in previous phylogenetic studies. Two subtribes (Desmodiinae and Lespedezinae) of Desmodieae were also supported as monophyletic groups. Within the subtribe Lespedezinae, Lespedeza is closer to Kummerowia than Campylotropis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0218743PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6590825PMC
February 2020

Lost and Found: Return of the Inverted Repeat in the Legume Clade Defined by Its Absence.

Genome Biol Evol 2019 04;11(4):1321-1333

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin.

The plant genome comprises a coevolving, integrated genetic system housed in three subcellular compartments: the nucleus, mitochondrion, and the plastid. The typical land plant plastid genome (plastome) comprises the sum of repeating units of 130-160 kb in length. The plastome inverted repeat (IR) divides each plastome monomer into large and small single copy regions, an architecture highly conserved across land plants. There have been varying degrees of expansion or contraction of the IR, and in a few distinct lineages, including the IR-lacking clade of papilionoid legumes, one copy of the IR has been lost. Completion of plastome sequencing and assembly for 19 Medicago species and Trigonella foenum-graceum and comparative analysis with other IR-lacking clade taxa revealed modest divergence with regard to structural organization overall. However, one clade contained unique variation suggesting an ancestor had experienced repeat-mediated changes in plastome structure. In Medicago minima, a novel IR of ∼9 kb was confirmed and the role of repeat-mediated, recombination-dependent replication in IR reemergence is discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evz076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6496590PMC
April 2019

Development of 16 microsatellite markers for the Korean endemic (Fabaceae).

Appl Plant Sci 2018 Jun 23;6(7):e01170. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Department of Biological Sciences Inha University Incheon 22212 Republic of Korea.

Premise Of The Study: (Fabaceae) is a narrowly endemic species restricted to mountain valleys of southern Korea. To investigate its fine-scale genetic diversity and differentiation in Korea, we developed polymorphic microsatellite markers.

Methods And Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from Illumina MiSeq data. In 74 individual plants from four populations, one to seven alleles were expressed for each locus. The levels of observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 0.778 and from 0.000 to 0.738, respectively. Cross-amplification was conducted with three related species and seven to 11 markers were successfully amplified.

Conclusions: These new microsatellite markers will be useful in future studies on the population genetics of .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aps3.1170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6055556PMC
June 2018

The complete plastid genome of (Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae), a vulnerable halophyte in coastal regions of Korea and Japan.

Mitochondrial DNA B Resour 2018 Mar 21;3(1):382-383. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

has limited distribution in the coastal regions of Korea and Japan and is named as a vulnerable halophyte in the Red List of Japan. The complete plastid genome of is 151,989 bp long, and is composed of large single-copy (83,492 bp) and small single-copy (18,121 bp) regions plus two inverted repeats (25,188 bp each). The plastid genome encodes 130 genes, including 8 rRNAs, 37 tRNAs, and 83 protein-coding genes. is pseudogenized. Phylogenetic analysis showed a sister relationship between and This complete plastid genome is the first reported in genus .
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23802359.2018.1437822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7800718PMC
March 2018

The complete chloroplast genome of hemi-parasitic (Orobanchaceae).

Mitochondrial DNA B Resour 2018 Feb 12;3(1):235-236. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Department of Biology Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

We determined the complete chloroplast genome of (Orobanchaceae), a hemi-parasitic perennial herb. This genome is 143,469 bp long and features a large single-copy region (81,664 bp) and a small single-copy region (12,203 bp), separated by two inverted-repeat regions (24,801 bp each). It contains 115 genes - 70 for coding, eight for rRNA, and 37 for tRNA. However, 11 genes have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted. Our phylogenetic tree showed that these hemi-parasitic plants are sister to holo-parasitic genera within Orobanchaceae.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23802359.2018.1437820DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7800071PMC
February 2018

The distinct plastid genome structure of Maackia fauriei (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) and its systematic implications for genistoids and tribe Sophoreae.

PLoS One 2017 11;12(4):e0173766. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Incheon, Republic of Korea.

Traditionally, the tribe Sophoreae sensu lato has been considered a basal but also heterogeneous taxonomic group of the papilionoid legumes. Phylogenetic studies have placed Sophoreae sensu stricto (s.s.) as a member of the core genistoids. The recently suggested new circumscription of this tribe involved the removal of traditional members and the inclusion of Euchresteae and Thermopsideae. Nonetheless, definitions and inter- and intra-taxonomic issues of Sophoreae remain unclear. Within the field of legume systematics, the molecular characteristics of a plastid genome (plastome) have an important role in helping to define taxonomic groups. Here, we examined the plastome of Maackia fauriei, belonging to Sophoreae s.s., to elucidate the molecular characteristics of Sophoreae. Its gene contents are similar to the plastomes of other typical legumes. Putative pseudogene rps16 of Maackia and Lupinus species imply independent functional gene loss from the genistoids. Our overall examination of that loss among legumes suggests that it is common among all major clades of Papilionoideae. The M. fauriei plastome has a novel 24-kb inversion in its large single copy region, as well as previously recognized 50-kb and 36-kb inversions. The 36-kb inversion is shared by the core genistoids. The 24-kb inversion is present in the eight genera belonging to three tribes: Euchresteae, Sophoreae s.s., and Thermopsideae. The phylogenetic distribution of this 24-kb inversion strongly supports the monophyly of members of Sophoreae s.s. with Euchresteae and Thermopsideae. Hence, it can be used as a putative synapomorphic characteristic for the newly circumscribed Sophoreae, including Euchresteae and Thermopsideae. However, plastome conformation suggests a slightly narrower taxonomic group because of heterogeneous results from Bolusanthus and Dicraeopetalum. The phylogenetic analysis, based on plastome sequences from 43 legumes, represents well our understanding of legume systematics while resolving the genistoid clade as a sister group to an Old World clade. It also demonstrates the value that plastomes are powerful marker for systematic studies of basal papilionoid legumes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0173766PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5388331PMC
September 2017

Isolation and characterization of 28 microsatellite loci for a Korean endemic, Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae).

Appl Plant Sci 2016 Jan 7;4(1). Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea.

Premise Of The Study: We developed microsatellite primers for Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae), a Korean endemic shrub, and conducted cross-amplifications for closely related species.

Methods And Results: We produced 28 polymorphic microsatellite markers through reference mapping of 300-bp paired-end reads obtained from Illumina MiSeq data. For 47 individual plants from two populations, the total alleles numbered two to 13, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.067 to 0.867 and from 0.064 to 0.848, respectively. Most of these markers were well amplified in closely related species.

Conclusions: In future research, the microsatellite markers described here will help reveal the taxonomic entity of this species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/apps.1500089DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4716779PMC
January 2016

Development of microsatellite markers for the endangered Pedicularis ishidoyana (Orobanchaceae) using next-generation sequencing.

Appl Plant Sci 2015 Dec 14;3(12). Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea.

Premise Of The Study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Pedicularis ishidoyana (Orobanchaceae), an endangered and hemiparasitic plant that is narrowly endemic to Korea. Because its populations are threatened by loss of suitable habitat, conservation efforts are required.

Methods And Results: We developed polymorphic microsatellite loci through reference mapping of 300-bp paired-end reads obtained from Illumina MiSeq data. In all, 74 primer pairs were designed and 32 were amplified. Of these, 18 pairs were polymorphic, with two to six alleles each occurring in 26 individual plants. Expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.142 to 0.703 and from 0.077 to 0.615, respectively.

Conclusions: These microsatellite markers are expected to be useful for studies of the population genetics of P. ishidoyana.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/apps.1500083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4683043PMC
December 2015

Graves disease following rabbit antithymocyte globulin treatment of severe aplastic anemia in a Korean child.

Korean J Pediatr 2015 Jul 22;58(7):267-9. Epub 2015 Jul 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used as an immunosuppressive treatment (IST) to deplete clonal suppressor T cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). The depletion of suppressor T cells by ATG may affect the activation of B cells, which results in an increased risk for autoimmune conditions. A 12-year-old boy was diagnosed with idiopathic SAA. As he did not have an human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling, he was treated with rabbit ATG (3.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) and cyclosporine. Five months later, he became transfusion independent. However, 23 months after IST, he complained of mild hand tremors, sweating, weight loss, palpitations, and goiter. Results of thyroid function tests revealed hyperthyroidism (free thyroxine, 3.42 ng/dL; thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH], <0.01 nIU/mL; triiodothyronine, 3.99 ng/mL). Results of tests for autoantibodies were positive for the antimicrosome antibody and TSH-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin, but negative for the antithyroglobulin antibody and antinuclear antibody. He was treated with methimazole, and his symptoms improved. The patient has been disease free for 39 months after IST and 9 months after methimazole treatment. This case report suggests that although rare, rabbit ATG may have implications in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hyperthyroidism. Our findings suggest that thyroid function tests should be incorporated in the routine follow-up of SAA patients treated with ATG.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2015.58.7.267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4543187PMC
July 2015

The complete plastid genome of Piper kadsura (Piperaceae), an East Asian woody vine.

Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal 2016 09 11;27(5):3555-6. Epub 2015 Aug 11.

a K-herb Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine , Daejeon , Republic of Korea and.

We sequenced the complete plastid genome (plastome) for Piper kadsura, a woody vine endemic to East Asia. This species is part of the largest genus within Piperaceae and its genome is almost identical to its congener P. cenocladum. The plastome for P. kadsura comprises 131 genes, including four unique rRNAs, 30 tRNAs, and 79 protein-coding genes. It retains ycf1 as an intact open reading frame. Our phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the monophyly of the Piper genus. The additional plastome sequence found in this evolutionarily and economically important genus will be a valuable, fundamental tool for future studies of phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperms, and will provide a useful resource for molecular breeding programs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2015.1074216DOI Listing
September 2016

Complete plastid genome of Astragalus mongholicus var. nakaianus (Fabaceae).

Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal 2016 07 29;27(4):2838-9. Epub 2015 Jun 29.

a Department of Biological Sciences , Inha University , Incheon , Republic of Korea and.

The first complete plastid genome (plastome) of the largest angiosperm genus, Astragalus, was sequenced for the Korean endangered endemic species A. mongholicus var. nakaianus. Its genome is relatively short (123,633 bp) because it lacks an Inverted Repeat (IR) region. It comprises 110 genes, including four unique rRNAs, 30 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. Similar to other closely related plastomes, rpl22 and rps16 are absent. The putative pseudogene with abnormal stop codons is atpE. This plastome has no additional inversions when compared with highly variable plastomes from IRLC tribes Fabeae and Trifolieae. Our phylogenetic analysis confirms the non-monophyly of Galegeae.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/19401736.2015.1053118DOI Listing
July 2016

Random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio for screening hypercalciuria in children with hematuria.

Ann Lab Med 2013 Nov 17;33(6):401-5. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

Department of Pediatrics, Chonnam National University Medical School and Hospital, Gwangju, Korea.

Background: Hypercalciuria is one of the most common causes of unexplained isolated hematuria. The diagnostic methods for hypercalciuria have not yet been standardized. The aim of this study was to assess whether random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio could be used as a screening tool for hypercalciuria in children with hematuria.

Methods: This prospective study included 264 children with primary hematuria for whom both random and 24 hr urinary evaluations were performed. Pearson correlation and ROC curve were used to assess the correlations. A multiple linear regression model was used to analyze effects of age, weight, height, body mass index, and body surface area on random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio.

Results: There was a moderately strong correlation between random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio and 24 hr urinary calcium excretion (r=0.584, P<0.001). The most appropriate cutoff value of random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio for the estimation of hypercalciuria was 0.075 mg/mg (sensitivity, 77.8%; specificity, 64.3%; area under the curve, 0.778). Body mass index and 24 hr urinary calcium excretion significantly affected random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio with a low coefficient of determination (r(2)=0.380, P<0.001).

Conclusions: Random urinary calcium/creatinine ratio is not suitable for screening hypercalciuria in children with hematuria. Twenty-four hour urinary analysis should be performed to diagnose hypercalciuria in children with hematuria.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3343/alm.2013.33.6.401DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3819437PMC
November 2013

Isolation and characterization of ten microsatellite loci from Korean Astragalus mongholicus (Fabaceae).

J Genet 2013 Jul 30;92(2):e73-6. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Department of Biological Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751, Korea.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2013