Publications by authors named "Imogen Wilding"

3 Publications

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A rapid microtiter plate assay for measuring the effect of compounds on Staphylococcus aureus membrane potential.

J Microbiol Methods 2010 Nov 27;83(2):254-6. Epub 2010 Aug 27.

Antibacterial Discovery Performance Unit, Infectious Diseases Center of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Collegeville, PA 19426, United States.

We developed a homogenous microtiter based assay using the cationic dye 3, 3'-Diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide, DiOC2(3), to measure the effect of compounds on membrane potential in Staphylococcus aureus. In a screen of 372 compounds from a synthetic compound collection with anti-Escherichia coli activity due to unknown modes of action at least 17% demonstrated potent membrane activity, enabling rapid discrimination of nuisance compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2010.08.012DOI Listing
November 2010

Staphylococcus aureus 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase: crystal structure and mechanism.

J Biol Chem 2004 Oct 2;279(43):44883-8. Epub 2004 Aug 2.

GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Computational, Analytical, and Structural Sciences, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406, USA.

3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, a member of the family of acyl-condensing enzymes, catalyzes the first committed step in the mevalonate pathway and is a potential target for novel antibiotics and cholesterol-lowering agents. The Staphylococcus aureus mvaS gene product (43.2 kDa) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown biochemically to be an HMG-CoA synthase. The crystal structure of the full-length enzyme was determined at 2.0-A resolution, representing the first structure of an HMG-CoA synthase from any organism. HMG-CoA synthase forms a homodimer. The monomer, however, contains an important core structure of two similar alpha/beta motifs, a fold that is completely conserved among acyl-condensing enzymes. This common fold provides a scaffold for a catalytic triad made up of Cys, His, and Asn required by these enzymes. In addition, a crystal structure of HMG-CoA synthase with acetoacetyl-CoA was determined at 2.5-A resolution. Together, these structures provide the structural basis for an understanding of the mechanism of HMG-CoA synthase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M407882200DOI Listing
October 2004

Enterococcus faecalis acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a dual-function protein of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis.

J Bacteriol 2002 Apr;184(8):2116-22

Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-1153, USA.

Many bacteria employ the nonmevalonate pathway for synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the monomer unit for isoprenoid biosynthesis. However, gram-positive cocci exclusively use the mevalonate pathway, which is essential for their growth (E. I. Wilding et al., J. Bacteriol. 182:4319-4327, 2000). Enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are thus potential targets for drug intervention. Uniquely, the enterococci possess a single open reading frame, mvaE, that appears to encode two enzymes of the mevalonate pathway, acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Western blotting revealed that the mvaE gene product is a single polypeptide in Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus hirae. The mvaE gene was cloned from E. faecalis and was expressed with an N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli. The gene product was then purified by nickel affinity chromatography. As predicted, the 86.5-kDa mvaE gene product catalyzed both the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and HMG-CoA reductase reactions. Temperature optima, DeltaH(a) and K(m) values, and pH optima were determined for both activities. Kinetic studies of acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase implicated a ping-pong mechanism. CoA acted as an inhibitor competitive with acetyl-CoA. A millimolar K(i) for a statin drug confirmed that E. faecalis HMG-CoA reductase is a class II enzyme. The oxidoreductant was NADP(H). A role for an active-site histidine during the first redox step of the HMG-CoA, reductase reaction was suggested by the ability of diethylpyrocarbonate to block formation of mevalonate from HMG-CoA, but not from mevaldehyde. Sequence comparisons with other HMG-CoA reductases suggest that the essential active-site histidine is His756. The mvaE gene product represents the first example of an HMG-CoA reductase fused to another enzyme.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC134966PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jb.184.8.2116-2122.2002DOI Listing
April 2002