Publications by authors named "Ilju Kim"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The anti-diabetic effects of NAG-1/GDF15 on HFD/STZ-induced mice.

Sci Rep 2021 Jul 22;11(1):15027. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Laboratory of Signal Transduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) plays a role in various diseases. Here, the anti-diabetic effects of NAG-1 were evaluated using a high-fat diet/streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. NAG-1-overexpressing transgenic (NAG-1 Tg) mice exhibited lower body weight, fasting blood glucose levels, and serum insulin levels than wild-type (WT) mice. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance scores of NAG-1 Tg mice were lower than those of WT mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed a smaller lipid droplet size in the adipose tissues, lower lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, and larger beta cell area in the pancreas of NAG-1 Tg mice than in those of WT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed downregulated expression of cleaved caspase-3, an apoptosis marker, in the beta cells of NAG-1 Tg mice. Adiponectin and leptin mRNA levels were upregulated and downregulated in NAG-1 Tg mice, respectively. Additionally, the expression of IRS1/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway components, especially Foxo1, which regulates gluconeogenesis in the muscle and white adipose tissue, was downregulated in NAG-1 Tg mice. Furthermore, NAG-1 overexpression promoted the expression of As160 in both muscles and adipocytes, and the mRNA levels of the NLRP3 pathway members were downregulated in NAG-1 Tg mice. Our findings suggest that NAG-1 expression alleviates diabetes in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94581-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8298384PMC
July 2021

Light-Designed Shark Skin-Mimetic Surfaces.

Nano Lett 2021 07 29;21(13):5500-5507. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea.

Sharks, marine creatures that swim fast and have an antifouling ability, possess dermal denticle structures of micrometer-size. Because the riblet geometries on the denticles reduce the shear stress by inducing the slip of fluid parallel to the stream-wise direction, shark skin has the distinguished features of low drag and antifouling. Although much attention has been given to low-drag surfaces inspired from shark skin, it remains an important challenge to accurately mimic denticle structures in the micrometer scale and to finely control their structural features. This paper presents a novel method to create shark skin-mimetic denticle structures for low drag by exploiting a photoreconfigurable azopolymer. The light-designed denticle structure exhibits superior hydrophobicity and an antifouling effect as sharks do. This work suggests that our novel photoreconfiguration technology, mimicking shark skin and systematically manipulating various structural parameters, can be used in a reliable manner for diverse applications requiring low-drag surfaces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00436DOI Listing
July 2021

Competitive inhibition by NAG-1/GDF-15 NLS peptide enhances its anti-cancer activity.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2019 10 29;519(1):29-34. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Laboratory of Signal Transduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1), also known as growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), is a TGF-β (transforming growth factor beta) superfamily protein with a distinctive secretion pathway. NAG-1 is associated with multiple diseases including cancer, wherein it plays a role in both pro- and anti-cancer activities. We previously reported that NAG-1 is translocated to different subcellular compartments and its activity depends on its localization. In this paper, we report that the transfection of a novel peptide corresponding to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of NAG-1 blocks its translocation to the nucleus. Further, accumulation of NAG-1 in the cytoplasm decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, thus implying apoptosis induction as a consequence. Overall, our results indicate that the novel peptide derived from NAG-1 NLS sequence is a promising tool for enhancing the anti-tumorigenic activity of NAG-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2019.08.090DOI Listing
October 2019
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