Publications by authors named "Ilaria Ferrigno"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Minimal Residual Disease in Multiple Myeloma: State of the Art and Applications in Clinical Practice.

J Pers Med 2020 Sep 10;10(3). Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Division of Hematology, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy.

Novel drugs have revolutionized multiple myeloma therapy in the last 20 years, with median survival that has doubled to up to 8-10 years. The introduction of therapeutic strategies, such as consolidation and maintenance after autologous stem cell transplants, has also ameliorated clinical results. The goal of modern therapies is becoming not only complete remission, but also the deepest possible remission. In this context, the evaluation of minimal residual disease by techniques such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) and next-generation flow (NGF) is becoming part of all new clinical trials that test drug efficacy. This review focuses on minimal residual disease approaches in clinical trials, with particular attention to real-world practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm10030120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7565263PMC
September 2020

GnRH Antagonists Produce Differential Modulation of the Signaling Pathways Mediated by GnRH Receptors.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Nov 7;20(22). Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Unit of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via P. Giardini 1355, 41126 Modena, Italy.

Commercial gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists differ by 1-2 amino acids and are used to inhibit gonadotropin production during assisted reproduction technologies (ART). In this study, potencies of three GnRH antagonists, Cetrorelix, Ganirelix and Teverelix, in inhibiting GnRH-mediated intracellular signaling, were compared in vitro. GnRH receptor (GnRHR)-transfected HEK293 and neuroblastoma-derived SH-SY5Y cell lines, as well as mouse pituitary LβT2 cells endogenously expressing the murine GnRHR, were treated with GnRH in the presence or absence of the antagonist. We evaluated intracellular calcium (Ca) and cAMP increases, cAMP-responsive element binding-protein (CREB) and extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, β-catenin activation and mouse luteinizing-hormone β-encoding gene () transcription by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), Western blotting, immunostaining and real-time PCR as appropriate. The kinetics of GnRH-induced Ca rapid increase revealed dose-response accumulation with potency (EC50) of 23 nM in transfected HEK293 cells, transfected SH-SY5Y and LβT2 cells. Cetrorelix inhibited the 3 × EC GnRH-activated calcium signaling at concentrations of 1 nM-1 µM, demonstrating higher potency than Ganirelix and Teverelix, whose inhibitory doses fell within the 100 nM-1 µM range in both transfected HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells in vitro. In transfected SH-SY5Y, Cetrorelix was also significantly more potent than other antagonists in reducing GnRH-mediated cAMP accumulation. All antagonists inhibited pERK1/2 and pCREB activation at similar doses, in LβT2 and transfected HEK293 cells treated with 100 nM GnRH. Although immunostainings suggested that Teverelix could be less effective than Cetrorelix and Ganirelix in inhibiting 1 µM GnRH-induced β-catenin activation, gene expression increase occurring upon LβT2 cell treatment by 1 µM GnRH was similarly inhibited by all antagonists. To conclude, this study has demonstrated Cetrorelix-, Ganirelix- and Teverelix-specific biased effects at the intracellular level, not affecting the efficacy of antagonists in inhibiting gene transcription.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20225548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6888270PMC
November 2019

Study of gene polymorphisms as predictors of treatment efficacy and toxicity in patients with indolent non-hodgkin lymphomas and mantle cell lymphoma receiving bendamustine and rituximab.

Br J Haematol 2019 01 11;184(2):223-231. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Unit of Haematology, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy.

Bendamustine is used in combination with rituximab (BR) to treat indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas (iNHL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The variability in treatment efficacy and toxicity could be related to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes. We would like to show a correlation between SNPs and treatment outcome in iNHL and MCL patients receiving BR. We investigated some SNPs that had already been associated with NHL outcome. Samples were genotyped for the IL2 (rs2069762), IL10 (rs1800890, rs10494879), VEGFA (rs3025039), IL8 (rs4073), CFH (rs1065489) and MTHFR (rs1801131) SNPs by allelic discrimination assays. We enrolled 70 patients that received rituximab 375 mg/m and bendamustine 90 mg/m every 28 days, both as first-line treatment and ≥ second-line regimens. Overall response rate was 97·1% (complete response [CR] rate 73·9%). Treatment toxicity included grade 3-4 neutropenia (24/70 patients), infections (21/70 patients; 1/70 grade 3), skin rash (26/70 patients; 2/70 grade 3). After a median follow-up of 24 months we did find any correlation between the analysed SNPs, CR rate and PFS. However, we demonstrated an association between the SNP in IL2 (rs2069762) and the onset of skin rash (P = 0·0001). Our study suggests a role for cytokine SNPs in bendamustine-related toxicity, which could represent a promising research field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15582DOI Listing
January 2019

Residual Peripheral Blood CD26 Leukemic Stem Cells in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients During TKI Therapy and During Treatment-Free Remission.

Front Oncol 2018 30;8:194. Epub 2018 May 30.

Hematology Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in sustained "deep molecular response" may stop TKI treatment without disease recurrence; however, half of them lose molecular response shortly after TKI withdrawing. Well-defined eligibility criteria to predict a safe discontinuation up-front are still missing. Relapse is probably due to residual quiescent TKI-resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs) supposedly transcriptionally low/silent and not easily detectable by BCR-ABL1 qRT-PCR. Bone marrow Ph+ CML CD34/CD38 LSCs were found to specifically co-express CD26 (dipeptidylpeptidase-IV). We explored feasibility of detecting and quantifying CD26 LSCs by flow cytometry in peripheral blood (PB). Over 400 CML patients (at diagnosis and during/after therapy) entered this cross-sectional study in which CD26 expression was evaluated by a standardized multiparametric flow cytometry analysis on PB CD45/CD34/CD38 stem cell population. All 120 CP-CML patients at diagnosis showed measurable PB CD26 LSCs (median 19.20/μL, range 0.27-698.6). PB CD26 LSCs were also detectable in 169/236 (71.6%) CP-CML patients in first-line TKI treatment (median 0.014 cells/μL; range 0.0012-0.66) and in 74/112 (66%), additional patients studied on treatment-free remission (TFR) (median 0.015/μL; range 0.006-0.76). Notably, no correlation between BCR-ABL/ABL ratio and number of residual LSCs was found both in patients on or off TKIs. This is the first evidence that "circulating" CML LSCs persist in the majority of CML patients in molecular response while on TKI treatment and even after TKI discontinuation. Prospective studies evaluating the dynamics of PB CD26 LSCs during TKI treatment and the role of a "stem cell response" threshold to achieve and maintain TFR are ongoing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2018.00194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5988870PMC
May 2018