Publications by authors named "Ifeyinwa V Asiodu"

9 Publications

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Breastfeeding in Incarcerated Settings in the United States: A National Survey of Frequency and Policies.

Breastfeed Med 2021 Apr 8. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

: To assess the existence of prison and jail policies and practices that allow incarcerated women to breastfeed while in custody, and prevalence of women in custody who pumped human milk for their infants. : We surveyed 22 state prison systems and 6 county jails from 2016 to 2017 about policies related to breastfeeding and other programs for pregnant and parenting women in custody. In addition, 11 prisons and 5 jails reported 6 months of monthly, prospective data on the number of women pumping human milk, as well as information on placement of infants born to women in custody. Eleven prisons and five jails had policies that supported the practice of expressed milk, either through pumping or breastfeeding. Over 6 months at these sites that allowed lactation, there were 207 women who gave birth in the prisons and an average of 8 women/month who pumped human milk; at the jails, there were 67 women who gave birth and an average of 6 women/month who pumped human milk. Most infants born to women in custody were placed in the care of a family member. Breastfeeding and the provision of human milk are critical public health issues. Our data show inconsistent implementation of policies and practices supportive of breastfeeding in prisons and jails. However, there are institutions in the United States that are supportive of incarcerated women's breastfeeding and lactation needs. Further research is needed to identify the barriers and facilitators associated with implementing supportive breastfeeding policies and practices in the carceral system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2020.0410DOI Listing
April 2021

Infant Outcomes Following Maternal Infection with SARS-CoV-2: First Report from the PRIORITY Study.

Clin Infect Dis 2020 Sep 18. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

University of California San Francisco.

Infant outcomes after maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection are not well-described. In a prospective U.S. registry of 263 infants born to mothers testing positive or negative for SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2 status was not associated with birth weight, difficulty breathing, apnea or upper or lower respiratory infection through 8 weeks of age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa1411DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7543372PMC
September 2020

Reflecting on Equity in Perinatal Care During a Pandemic.

Health Equity 2020 28;4(1):330-333. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Department of Family Practice, Midwifery Program, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Growing discourse around maternity care during the pandemic offers an opportunity to reflect on how this crisis has amplified inequities in health care. We argue that policies upholding the rights of birthing people, and policies decreasing the risk of COVID-19 transmission are not mutually exclusive. The explicit lack of standardization of evidence-based maternity care, whether expressed in clinical protocols or institutional policy, has disproportionately impacted marginalized communities. If these factors remain unexamined, then it would seem that equity is not the priority, but retaining power and control is. We advocate for a comprehensive understanding of how this pandemic has revealed our deepest failures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/heq.2020.0022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7410286PMC
July 2020

The COVID-19 liquid gold rush: Critical perspectives of human milk and SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Am J Hum Biol 2020 09 5;32(5):e23481. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.23481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7435540PMC
September 2020

Racial and Ethnic Inequities in Postpartum Pain Evaluation and Management.

Obstet Gynecol 2019 12;134(6):1155-1162

Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the Department of Family Health Care Nursing, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, California; and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute and the Department of Maternal and Child Health, Gillings School of Global Public Health, and the University of North Carolina School of Social Work, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Objective: To evaluate whether the frequency of pain assessment and treatment differed by patient race and ethnicity for women after cesarean birth.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all women who underwent cesarean birth resulting in a liveborn neonate at a single institution between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2016. Pain scores documented and medications administered after delivery were grouped into 0-24 and 25-48 hours postpartum time periods. Number of pain scores recorded, whether any pain score was 7 of 10 or greater, and analgesic medication administered were calculated. Models were adjusted for propensity scores incorporating maternal age, body mass index, gestational age, nulliparity, primary compared with repeat cesarean delivery, classical hysterotomy, and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit.

Results: A total of 1,987 women were identified, and 1,701 met inclusion criteria. There were 30,984 pain scores documented. Severe pain (7/10 or greater) was more common among black (28%) and Hispanic (22%) women than among women who identified as white (20%) or Asian (15%). In the first 24 hours after cesarean birth, non-Hispanic white women had more documented pain assessments (adjusted mean 10.2) than, black, Asian, and Hispanic women (adjusted mean 8.4-9.5; P<.05). Results at 25-48 hours were similar, compared with non-Hispanic white women (adjusted mean 8.3). Black, Asian, and Hispanic women and women who were identified as other all received less narcotic medication at 0-24 hours postpartum (adjusted mean 5.1-7.5 oxycodone tablet equivalents; P<.001-.05), as well as at 25-28 hours postpartum.

Conclusion: Racial and ethnic inequities in the experience, assessment and treatment of postpartum pain were identified. A limitation of our study is that we were unable to assess the role of patient beliefs about expression of pain, patient preferences with regards to pain medication, and beliefs and potential biases among health care providers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000003505DOI Listing
December 2019

Barriers to Human Milk Feeding at Discharge of Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants: Maternal Goal Setting as a Key Social Factor.

Breastfeed Med 2017 Jan/Feb;12:20-27. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

2 Department of Pediatrics, Rush University Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.

Background: While black mothers initiate human milk (HM) provision at lower rates than non-black mothers in the United States, some neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) report similar initiation rates regardless of race/ethnicity for mothers of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. However, racial disparity frequently becomes evident in the proportion of black infants who continue to receive HM feedings at NICU discharge. Since social factors have been associated with differences in HM provision for term infants, we sought to identify differences in social factors associated with HM feeding at discharge based on race/ethnicity.

Materials And Methods: A prospective cohort study of racially diverse mothers of VLBW infants measured social factors including maternal education, breastfeeding support, return to work/school, HM feeding goal, previous breastfeeding, or formula experience. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was applied to social factors to predict HM feeding at discharge. Additional regression models were created for racial/ethnic subgroups to identify differences.

Results: For all 362 mothers, WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) eligibility and maternal goal near time of discharge of providing any HM negatively and positively predicted HM feeding at discharge, respectively. Perceived breastfeeding support from the infant's maternal grandmother negatively predicted HM feeding at discharge for black mothers.

Conclusions: Future interventions to increase duration of HM provision in VLBW infants should focus on the establishment and maintenance of maternal HM feeding goals. Further studies of the familial support system of black mothers are warranted to determine multigenerational impact and potential interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2016.0105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5220570PMC
January 2018

Infant Feeding Decision-Making and the Influences of Social Support Persons Among First-Time African American Mothers.

Matern Child Health J 2017 04;21(4):863-872

Department of Family Health Care Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Background While breast milk is considered the gold standard of infant feeding, a majority of African American mothers are not exclusively breastfeeding their newborn infants. Objective The overall goal of this critical ethnographic research study was to describe infant feeding perceptions and experiences of African American mothers and their support persons. Methods Twenty-two participants (14 pregnant women and eight support persons) were recruited from public health programs and community based organizations in northern California. Data were collected through field observations, demographic questionnaires, and multiple in-person interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes. Results Half of the mothers noted an intention to exclusively breastfeed during the antepartum period. However, few mothers exclusively breastfed during the postpartum period. Many participants expressed guilt and shame for not being able to accomplish their antepartum goals. Life experiences and stressors, lack of breastfeeding role models, limited experiences with breastfeeding and lactation, and changes to the family dynamic played a major role in the infant feeding decision making process and breastfeeding duration. Conclusions for Practice Our observations suggest that while exclusivity goals were not being met, a considerable proportion of African American women were breastfeeding. Future interventions geared towards this population should include social media interventions, messaging around combination feeding, and increased education for identified social support persons. Public health measures aimed at reducing the current infant feeding inequities would benefit by also incorporating more culturally inclusive messaging around breastfeeding and lactation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-016-2167-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329142PMC
April 2017

Barriers to Human Milk Feeding at Discharge of Very Low-Birthweight Infants: Evaluation of Neighborhood Structural Factors.

Breastfeed Med 2016 09 27;11:335-42. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

1 College of Nursing, Rush University Medical Center , Chicago, Illinois.

Background: Although 98% of mothers in our cohort initiated human milk (HM) provision for their very low-birthweight (VLBW) infants, fewer black infants received HM at neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) discharge than non-black infants. This study examined neighborhood structural factors associated with HM feeding at discharge to identify potential barriers.

Materials And Methods: Sociodemographic and HM data were prospectively collected for 410 VLBW infants and mothers. Geocoded addresses were linked to neighborhood structural factors. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted for the entire cohort and racial/ethnic subgroups.

Results: HM feeding at discharge was positively correlated with further distance from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) office, less violent crime, less poverty, greater maternal education, older maternal age, greater infant gestational age, and shorter NICU hospitalization. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only maternal race/ethnicity, WIC eligibility, and length of NICU hospitalization predicted HM feeding at discharge for the entire cohort. The interaction between access to a car and race/ethnicity significantly differed between black and white/Asian mothers, although the predicted probability of HM feeding at discharge was not significantly affected by access to a car for any racial/ethnic subgroup.

Conclusions: Neighborhood structural factors did not significantly impact HM feeding at discharge. However, lack of access to a car may be a factor for black mothers, potentially representing restricted HM delivery to the NICU or limited social support, and warrants further study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bfm.2015.0185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5031119PMC
September 2016

Breastfeeding and use of social media among first-time African American mothers.

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 2015 Mar-Apr;44(2):268-78. Epub 2015 Feb 24.

Objective: To describe the use of social media during the antepartum and postpartum periods among first-time African American mothers and their support persons.

Design: A qualitative critical ethnographic research design within the contexts of family life course development theory and Black feminist theory.

Setting: Participants were recruited from community-based, public health, and home visiting programs.

Participants: A purposive sample was recruited, consisting of 14 pregnant African American women and eight support persons.

Methods: Pregnant and postpartum African American women and their support persons were interviewed separately during the antepartum and postpartum periods. Data were analyzed thematically.

Results: Participants frequently used social media for education and social support and searched the Internet for perinatal and parenting information. Most participants reported using at least one mobile application during their pregnancies and after giving birth. Social media were typically accessed through smartphones and/or computers using different websites and applications. Although participants gleaned considerable information about infant development from these applications, they had difficulty finding and recalling information about infant feeding.

Conclusion: Social media are an important vehicle to disseminate infant feeding information; however, they are not currently being used to full potential. Our findings suggest that future interventions geared toward African American mothers and their support persons should include social media approaches. The way individuals gather, receive, and interpret information is dynamic. The increasing popularity and use of social media platforms offers the opportunity to create more innovative, targeted mobile health interventions for infant feeding and breastfeeding promotion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1552-6909.12552DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4359664PMC
December 2015