Publications by authors named "Idoia Corcuera-Solano"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

MRI Evaluation of Various Elbow, Forearm, and Wrist Neuropathies: A Pictorial Review.

Semin Musculoskelet Radiol 2021 Aug 27;25(4):617-627. Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York.

Upper extremity entrapment neuropathies are common and can cause pain, sensory loss, and muscle weakness leading to functional disability. We conducted a retrospective review from January 2007 until March 2020 of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of intrinsic and extrinsic causes of wrist, forearm, and elbow neuropathies of 637 patients who received a diagnosis of neuropathy by means of clinical and electrodiagnostic testing. We discuss cases with varying intrinsic and extrinsic nerve pathologies, including postoperative examples, affecting the median, radial, and ulnar nerve.Our collection of cases demonstrates a diversity of intrinsic and extrinsic causative factors. Intrinsic pathologies include neuritis as well as tumors arising from the nerve. Extrinsic causes resulting in nerve entrapment include masses, acute and chronic posttraumatic cases, anatomical variants, inflammatory and crystal deposition, calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, and dialysis-related amyloidosis. Finally, we review postsurgical cases, such as carpal tunnel release and ulnar nerve transposition.Although upper extremity neuropathies tend to have a typical clinical presentation, imaging, particularly MRI, plays a vital role in evaluating the etiology and severity of each neuropathy and ultimately helps guide clinical management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729961DOI Listing
August 2021

Epiphyseal Ewing Sarcoma in a skeletally mature patient: A case report and review of the literature.

Radiol Case Rep 2021 May 19;16(5):1191-1197. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Diagnostic, Molecular and Interventional Radiology, Mount Sinai Health System, 1468 Madison Ave, New York, NY, 10029, USA.

While Ewing sarcoma of bone is the second most common primary osseous malignancy in childhood where it typically involves the diaphysis or metadiaphyses of long bones of skeletally immature patients, primary epiphyseal involvement of the long bone in skeletally mature patients is rare with no cases reported in the literature to our knowledge, rendering this case the first of its kind. We present the first case of primary Ewing Sarcoma of the epiphyses of the long bones in a skeletally mature 20-year-old male patient. The patient initially presented with left knee stiffness and pain that was empirically treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. His pain progressed despite treatment. An x-ray of the left knee was obtained 5 months later demonstrating an irregular lucent lesion in the medial femoral condyle. A subsequent MRI revealed an enhancing lesion in the medial femoral condyle, and when biopsied it was consistent with Ewing sarcoma (positive for gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization). The lesion was resected surgically, and the patient underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with a good clinical outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2021.02.049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010574PMC
May 2021

MRI features of pyoderma gangrenosum in a diabetic patient with ulcerative colitis: A case report and review of the literature.

Radiol Case Rep 2020 Dec 6;15(12):2540-2546. Epub 2020 Oct 6.

Diagnostic, Molecular and Interventional Radiology, Mount Sinai Health System, 1468 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare noninfectious skin condition which clinical picture can overlap with that of the diabetic foot. Meticulous physical examination along with biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can make the distinction easier, saving the patients from undergoing a debilitating intervention. We report a case of pathologically proven PG in the right ankle region of a 55-year old male with known uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and inflammatory bowel disease. Radiographs revealed increased soft tissue density overlying the lateral melleolus of the right ankle. MRI showed a well-defined soft tissue mass with heterogeneously intrinsically high signal intensity on T1- and on T2-weighted images, and heterogeneous peripheral enhancement on fat-suppressed, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Histologically, diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate throughout the dermis was present without micro-organisms. This is the first report of MRI findings of PG in the ankle. We also summarize the findings of previously reported cases of PG.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2020.09.038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7548426PMC
December 2020

Rhabdomyolysis as a manifestation of a severe case of COVID-19: A case report.

Radiol Case Rep 2020 Sep 7;15(9):1633-1637. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Diagnostic, Molecular and Interventional Radiology, Mount Sinai Health System, 1468 Madison Ave, 10029, New York, NY, USA.

Since the outbreak of the ongoing pandemic of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China, from December 2019, we have learned that multiple organs can be affected with the potential for various complications. Although myalgia is a frequent symptom in COVID-19 patients, no imaging findings of rhabdomyolysis have been featured in the literature. We report a case of presumed rhabdomyolysis in a 38-year-old male with COVID-19 based on the clinical presentation, laboratory results and radiological findings. By discussing the diagnostic rationale and reviewing the relevant literature we hope to advance the existing understanding of this disease and its effects on the musculoskeletal system.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2020.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7340044PMC
September 2020

Evaluation of HCC response to locoregional therapy: Validation of MRI-based response criteria versus explant pathology.

J Hepatol 2017 12 18;67(6):1213-1221. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Background And Aims: This study evaluates the performance of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response criteria for the prediction of complete pathologic necrosis (CPN) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) post locoregional therapy (LRT) using explant pathology as a reference.

Methods: We included 61 patients (male/female 46/15; mean age 60years) who underwent liver transplantation after LRT with transarterial chemoembolization plus radiofrequency or microwave ablation (n=56), or Yttrium radioembolization (n=5). MRI was performed <90days before liver transplantation. Three independent readers assessed the following criteria: RECIST, EASL, modified RECIST (mRECIST), percentage of necrosis on subtraction images, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), both qualitative (signal intensity) and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]). The degree of necrosis was retrospectively assessed at histopathology. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cohen's kappa were used to assess inter-reader agreement. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to determine imaging predictors of CPN. Pearson correlation was performed between imaging criteria and pathologic degree of tumor necrosis.

Results: A total of 97HCCs (mean size 2.3±1.3cm) including 28 with CPN were evaluated. There was excellent inter-reader agreement (ICC 0.77-0.86, all methods). EASL, mRECIST, percentage of necrosis and qualitative DWI were all significant (p<0.001) predictors of CPN, while RECIST and ADC were not. EASL, mRECIST and percentage of necrosis performed similarly (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.810-0.815) while the performance of qualitative DWI was lower (AUC 0.622). Image subtraction demonstrated the strongest correlation (r=0.71-0.72, p<0.0001) with pathologic degree of tumor necrosis.

Conclusions: EASL/mRECIST criteria and image subtraction have excellent diagnostic performance for predicting CPN in HCC treated with LRT, with image subtraction correlating best with pathologic degree of tumor necrosis. Thus, MR image subtraction is recommended for assessing HCC response to LRT.

Lay Summary: The assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor necrosis after locoregional therapy is essential for additional treatment planning and estimation of outcome. In this study, we assessed the performance of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response criteria (RECIST, mRECIST, EASL, percentage of necrosis on subtraction images, and diffusion-weighted imaging) for the prediction of complete pathologic necrosis of HCC post locoregional therapy on liver explant. Patients who underwent liver transplantation after locoregional therapy were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent routine liver MRI within 90days of liver transplantation. EASL/mRECIST criteria and image subtraction had excellent diagnostic performance for predicting complete pathologic necrosis in treated HCC, with image subtraction correlating best with pathologic degree of tumor necrosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2017.07.030DOI Listing
December 2017

Comparison Between 3-Scan Trace and Diagonal Body Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Acquisitions: A Phantom and Volunteer Study.

Tomography 2016 Dec;2(4):411-420

Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Diagonal diffusion-weighted imaging (dDWI) uses simultaneous maximized application of 3 orthogonal gradient systems as opposed to sequential acquisition in 3 directions in conventional 3-scan trace DWI (tDWI). Several theoretical advantages of dDWI vs. tDWI include reduced artifacts and increased sharpness. We compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantification and image quality between monopolar dDWI and tDWI in a dedicated diffusion phantom (b = 0/500/900/2000 s/mm) and in the abdomen (b = 50/400/800 s/mm) and pelvis (b = 50/1000/1600 s/mm) of 2 male volunteers at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. Phantom estimated signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) was also measured. Two independent observers assessed the image quality on a 5-point scale. In the phantom, image quality was similar between tDWI and dDWI, with equivalent ADC quantification (mean coefficient of variation [CV] between sequences: 1.4% ± 1.2% at 1.5 T and 0.7% ± 0.7% at 3.0 T). Phantom eSNR was similar for both tDWI and dDWI, except for a significantly lower eSNR for b900 of dDWI at 3.0 T ( = .006). In the volunteers, the CV values between tDWI and dDWI were higher than those in the phantom (CV range: abdominal organs, 1.3%-13.3%; pelvic organs, 0.6%-5.7%). A trend toward significant better image quality for dDWI compared with tDWI was observed for b800 (abdomen) at 3.0 T and for b1000 and b1600 (pelvis) at 1.5 T ( = .063 to .066). Our data suggest that dDWI may provide better image quality than tDWI without affecting ADC quantification, needing confirmation in a future clinical study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.18383/j.tom.2016.00229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5416814PMC
December 2016

DWI of the prostate: Comparison of a faster diagonal acquisition to standard three-scan trace acquisition.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2017 12 16;46(6):1767-1775. Epub 2017 Mar 16.

Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA.

Purpose: To compare a faster diagonal diffusion-weighted imaging (d-DWI) to conventional three-scan trace DWI (t-DWI) acquisition for prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of image quality, tumor detection/conspicuity, Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) characterization, quantitative estimated signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement.

Patients And Methods: A total of 34 consecutive men with suspected prostate cancer (PCa) who underwent 3T MRI of the prostate were assessed. MRI included t-DWI and d-DWI (using b-values of 50, 1000, and 1600 s/mm , number of averages 1/5/10 for t-DWI vs. 2/8/14 for d-DWI, acquisition time 6:21 min vs. 4:17 min, respectively). Two independent observers evaluated image quality, including image sharpness, anatomic distortion, and artifacts on a 5-point scale (1-5) and assessed tumor detection, conspicuity, and PI-RADS classification with both DWI sequences. eSNR and ADC were measured in the peripheral zone (PZ), transitional zone (TZ), and detected tumors. Data was compared using paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests and McNemar test. Coefficients of variations (CV) between ADC obtained with both sequences were calculated.

Results: Significantly fewer artifacts were observed on d-DWI at b 1600 for observer 2 (P < 0.01), while the other image quality scores were equivalent for both sequences. eSNR was lower with d-DWI vs. t-DWI in PZ and TZ for b 1000 (P < 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively) and b 1600 (P < 0.01 for both). ADC reproducibility between sequences was excellent (CV <10%). No significant differences were found for tumor detection (P ≥ 0.25), conspicuity (P ≥ 0.12), or PI-RADS classification (P ≥ 0.10).

Conclusion: d-DWI can provide a substantial reduction in acquisition time (∼30%) while maintaining equivalent tumor detection, PI-RADS score, image quality, and ADC values.

Level Of Evidence: 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1767-1775.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.25705DOI Listing
December 2017

Technical Failure of MR Elastography Examinations of the Liver: Experience from a Large Single-Center Study.

Radiology 2017 08 3;284(2):401-412. Epub 2017 Jan 3.

From the Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute (M.W., I.C.S., C.B., N.C., B.T.) and Department of Radiology (I.C.S., G.L., S.E., J.L., C.B., G.A., B.T.), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, Box 1234, New York, NY 10029; MR Applications and Workflow, GE Healthcare, New York, NY (M.F.); Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (J.S.B.); and Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn (R.L.E.).

Purpose To assess the determinants of technical failure of magnetic resonance (MR) elastography of the liver in a large single-center study. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Seven hundred eighty-one MR elastography examinations performed in 691 consecutive patients (mean age, 58 years; male patients, 434 [62.8%]) in a single center between June 2013 and August 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. MR elastography was performed at 3.0 T (n = 443) or 1.5 T (n = 338) by using a gradient-recalled-echo pulse sequence. MR elastography and anatomic image analysis were performed by two observers. Additional observers measured liver T2* and fat fraction. Technical failure was defined as no pixel value with a confidence index higher than 95% and/or no apparent shear waves imaged. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess potential predictive factors of technical failure of MR elastography. Results The technical failure rate of MR elastography at 1.5 T was 3.5% (12 of 338), while it was higher, 15.3% (68 of 443), at 3.0 T. On the basis of univariate analysis, body mass index, liver iron deposition, massive ascites, use of 3.0 T, presence of cirrhosis, and alcoholic liver disease were all significantly associated with failure of MR elastography (P < .004); but on the basis of multivariable analysis, only body mass index, liver iron deposition, massive ascites, and use of 3.0 T were significantly associated with failure of MR elastography (P < .004). Conclusion The technical failure rate of MR elastography with a gradient-recalled-echo pulse sequence was low at 1.5 T but substantially higher at 3.0 T. Massive ascites, iron deposition, and high body mass index were additional independent factors associated with failure of MR elastography of the liver with a two-dimensional gradient-recalled-echo pulse sequence. RSNA, 2017.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2016160863DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5548447PMC
August 2017

Contrast-Enhanced Dixon Fat-Water Separation Imaging of the Spine: Added Value of Fat, In-Phase and Opposed-Phase Imaging in Marrow Lesion Detection.

J Comput Assist Tomogr 2016 Nov/Dec;40(6):985-990

From the Department of Radiology, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.

Objective: Beyond fat suppression (FS), the efficacy of (fat-water separation or Dixon [FWD]) Dixon imaging in gadolinium-enhanced spine imaging has yet to be validated. This study evaluated enhanced opposed-phase (OP) and fat-only (FO) images along with water-only (WO; FS) images against traditional unenhanced techniques and rated the incremental value of in-phase imaging in patients with presumed neoplastic focal spine lesions.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 36 subjects with focal spine lesions imaged with FWD was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively.

Results: Enhanced OP, WO, and FO images were of significant value in detection of osseous lesions, surpassing the lesion conspicuity with conventional techniques both qualitatively and quantitatively, although the impact of in-phase imaging was limited. Water-only imaging performed well for FS.

Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced FO, WO, and OP outperform traditional techniques, providing reliable lesion characterization and highest conspicuity. In-phase imaging offered limited impact on the subjective assessment of enhancement. The added value and robustness of FWD, particularly the unique contrast provided by FO imaging, suggests consideration for routine use for postgadolinium spine imaging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RCT.0000000000000453DOI Listing
January 2017

Diffusion-weighted imaging outside the brain: Consensus statement from an ISMRM-sponsored workshop.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2016 09 19;44(3):521-40. Epub 2016 Feb 19.

Institute of Cancer Research and Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK.

The significant advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hardware and software, sequence design, and postprocessing methods have made diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) an important part of body MRI protocols and have fueled extensive research on quantitative diffusion outside the brain, particularly in the oncologic setting. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date information on DWI acquisition and clinical applications outside the brain, as discussed in an ISMRM-sponsored symposium held in April 2015. We first introduce recent advances in acquisition, processing, and quality control; then review scientific evidence in major organ systems; and finally describe future directions. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:521-540.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.25196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4983499PMC
September 2016

Three-Tesla imaging of the pituitary and parasellar region: T1-weighted 3-dimensional fast spin echo cube outperforms conventional 2-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

J Comput Assist Tomogr 2015 May-Jun;39(3):329-33

From the Department of Neuroradiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.

Objective: We explored how a novel T1-weighted 3-dimensional (3D) fast spin echo (FSE) sequence (Cube; GE, Waukesha, Wis) might outperform conventional 2-dimensional (2D) FSE techniques for contrast-enhanced imaging of the pituitary and parasellar region.

Methods: Ninety-one patients were imaged with 3D Cube and conventional 2D FSE on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently assessed images for anatomical delineation (infundibulum, optic apparatus, and cavernous sinus), degree of artifact, and confidence in lesion definition or exclusion using a 5-point scale. In addition, the readers were asked to rank overall preference.

Results: Readers A and B found 3D Cube to be better or equal to 2D FSE in 84% and 86% of the cases. Three-dimensional Cube provided significantly better images than 2D FSE with respect to delineation of the infundibulum (P < 0.0001), cavernous sinus (P < 0.0001), optic apparatus (P = 0.002 for reader A and P = 0.265 for reader B), and fewer artifacts at the sellar floor (P < 0.0001). Three-dimensional Cube provided greater lesion conspicuity or confidence in lesion exclusion (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Three-dimensional Cube provides superior quality with thinner slices as well as diminished artifact and can replace conventional 2D FSE sequences for routine evaluations of the pituitary and parasellar region.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RCT.0000000000000214DOI Listing
July 2015

Optimized imaging of the postoperative spine.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am 2014 May;24(2):349-64

Department of Neuroradiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Few tasks in imaging are more challenging than that of optimizing evaluations of the instrumented spine. The authors describe how applying fundamental and more advanced principles to postoperative spine computed tomography and magnetic resonance examinations mitigates the challenges associated with metal implants and significantly improves image quality and consistency. Newer and soon-to-be-available enhancements should provide improved visualization of tissues and hardware as multispectral imaging sequences continue to develop.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2014.01.005DOI Listing
May 2014

Pattern of regional cortical thinning associated with cognitive deterioration in Parkinson's disease.

PLoS One 2013 24;8(1):e54980. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Dementia is a frequent and devastating complication in Parkinson's disease (PD). There is an intensive search for biomarkers that may predict the progression from normal cognition (PD-NC) to dementia (PDD) in PD. Mild cognitive impairment in PD (PD-MCI) seems to represent a transitional state between PD-NC and PDD. Few studies have explored the structural changes that differentiate PD-NC from PD-MCI and PDD patients.

Objectives And Methods: We aimed to analyze changes in cortical thickness on 3.0T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) across stages of cognitive decline in a prospective sample of PD-NC (n = 26), PD-MCI (n = 26) and PDD (n = 20) patients, compared to a group of healthy subjects (HC) (n = 18). Cortical thickness measurements were made using the automatic software Freesurfer.

Results: In a sample of 72 PD patients, a pattern of linear and progressive cortical thinning was observed between cognitive groups in cortical areas functionally specialized in declarative memory (entorhinal cortex, anterior temporal pole), semantic knowledge (parahippocampus, fusiform gyrus), and visuoperceptive integration (banks of the superior temporal sulcus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus). Positive correlation was observed between confrontation naming and thinning in the fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus and anterior temporal pole; clock copy with thinning of the precuneus, parahippocampal and lingual gyrus; and delayed memory with thinning of the bilateral anteromedial temporal cortex.

Conclusions: The pattern of regional decreased cortical thickness that relates to cognitive deterioration is present in PD-MCI patients, involving areas that play a central role in the storage of prior experiences, integration of external perceptions, and semantic processing.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0054980PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3554657PMC
September 2013

Predicting dementia development in Parkinson's disease using Bayesian network classifiers.

Psychiatry Res 2013 Aug 11;213(2):92-8. Epub 2012 Nov 11.

Computational Intelligence Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Campus de Montegancedo, 28660 Boadilla del Monte, Madrid 28660, Spain.

Parkinson's disease (PD) has broadly been associated with mild cognitive impairment (PDMCI) and dementia (PDD). Researchers have studied surrogate, neuroanatomic biomarkers provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may help in the early diagnosis of this condition. In this article, four classification models (naïve Bayes, multivariate filter-based naïve Bayes, filter selective naïve Bayes and support vector machines, SVM) have been applied to evaluate their capacity to discriminate between cognitively intact patients with Parkinson's disease (PDCI), PDMCI and PDD. For this purpose, the MRI studies of 45 subjects (16 PDCI, 15 PDMCI and 14 PDD) were acquired and post-processed with Freesurfer, obtaining 112 variables (volumes of subcortical structures and thickness of cortical parcels) per subject. A multivariate filter-based naïve Bayes model was found to be the best classifier, having the highest cross-validated sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Additionally, the most relevant variables related to dementia in PD, as predicted by our classifiers, were cerebral white matter, and volumes of the lateral ventricles and hippocampi.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2012.06.001DOI Listing
August 2013
-->