Publications by authors named "Ibrahim Althubaiti"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery for patients with normal MRI: A Single center experience.

Epilepsy Res 2021 Jul 23;173:106620. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Neurology Section, Medical Department, Aldara Hospital and Medical Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address:

Objective: To analyze the surgical outcome in non-lesional intractable focal epilepsies in our center and to find possible predictors for better outcome.

Methods: This is a retrospective study for 40 adult patients with intractable focal epilepsy following at KFSHRC-Riyadh, who underwent presurgical evaluation followed by resective surgery and continued follow up for a minimum of 2 years. The surgery outcome was evaluated based on the type of surgical procedure and histopathology results.

Results: Out of all 40 patients studied, seizure freedom was achieved in 19 (47.5 %) and 17 (42.5 %) patients at the first and second year respectively in all non-lesional cases. Seizure freedom in non-lesional temporal lobe surgery was achieved in 10 (45 %) of patients at 2 years, 5 (38 %) in non-lesional frontal lobe patients at 2 years and 8 (44 %), 7 (38 %) for all extratemporal at 1 and 2 years respectively. Good prognosis was seen in patients with localized positron emission tomography (PET), had no aura and had a clear ictal onset either on scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) or subdural invasive electroencephalogram.

Significance: The best surgical outcome is achievable in patients with non-lesional focal epilepsy. This study highlights the prognostic value of the PET scan and ictal scalp/subdural invasive EEG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2021.106620DOI Listing
July 2021

Saudi Arabian Consensus Statement on Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Refractory Epilepsy.

Saudi J Med Med Sci 2021 Jan-Apr;9(1):75-81. Epub 2020 Dec 26.

Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approved adjunctive therapy for refractory epilepsy and used in patients who are not candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. In Saudi Arabia, VNS device implantation is being performed since 2008 by several comprehensive epilepsy programs, but with variable protocols. Therefore, to standardize the use of VNS, a task force was established to create a national consensus. This group consisted of epileptologists, epilepsy surgeons and a VNS nurse coordinator working in comprehensive epilepsy centers and dealing with refractory epilepsy cases. The group intensively reviewed the literature using Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library, in addition to physician's manual. Evidence is reported as three stages: preimplantation and patient selection, a perioperative phase involving all stakeholders and post-operative care with specific programming pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/sjmms.sjmms_578_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7839567PMC
December 2020

Surgical management of a retropharyngeal pseudomeningocele: Case report.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2020 30;76:331-334. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Suliman Al Habib Medical Group, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Introduction: Retropharyngeal pseudomeningocele is a very rare form of pseudomeningocele, that is known to be associated with cervical trauma. Identifying such pathology can be challenging leading to delayed management.

Case Presentation: We report a case of post-traumatic retropharyngeal pseudomeningocele that was managed surgically in a 21-year-old gentleman with poly-trauma injuries due to a motor vehicle accident. After 10 weeks since the traumatic event, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerised tomography (CT) scan showed evidence of bilateral atlanto-occipital dislocation and a fluid collection of 8 × 4 × 2 cm in the retropharyngeal space. The patient was found to have dysphagia and muffled voice with difficult visualisation of the vocal cords upon examination. After a multidisciplinary team decision, the patient underwent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak management, pseudomeningocele resection and dural defect repair with shunting conducted by the Neurosurgery and Otolaryngology. Postoperative assessments and patient's symptoms, at 9 months follow-up, were satisfactory and reassuring.

Discussion: It's believed that conservative management with bed rest, elevation of bed head and acetazolamide is the initial step in management. As an alternative measure, shunting of the CSF had led to resolution of the collection. However, surgical removal of the collection and direct dural defect repair have been suggested in the literature but needed to be properly studied.

Conclusion: Early recognition of this condition is important to avoid management delay. With a multidisciplinary approach, surgical management can be safe and an acceptable option for retropharyngeal pseudomeningocele.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2020.09.191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7569257PMC
September 2020

Frontal disconnection surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy: Outcome in a series of 16 patients.

Epilepsia Open 2020 Sep 14;5(3):475-486. Epub 2020 Aug 14.

King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center Riyadh Saudi Arabia.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of frontal disconnection surgery in seizure control and related consequences in a consecutive patient series.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent frontal disconnection surgery for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). Baseline epilepsy characteristics, detailed presurgical evaluation including epileptogenic zone (EZ) localization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of epileptogenic lesion, and pathological findings were reviewed. Patients were followed postoperatively for seizure outcome at 1 year.

Results: A total of 16 patients were identified (six children and 10 adults). Most patients had a childhood onset of DRE with a median duration of epilepsy of 6.5 years (interquartile range 3.5-17.5 years) before surgery. In 10 (62.5%) patients, the EZ was localized to the frontal lobe, while in six patients, the EZ involved also adjacent lobes or consisted of multiple foci. In 10 (62.5%) patients, an epileptogenic lesion was detected on presurgical MRI, four of which (40%) had all MRI abnormalities confined to the frontal lobe. Two-thirds of the patients (11/16; 68.8%) underwent isolated frontal disconnection procedure, while remaining patients had frontal disconnection combined with resection of an adjacent lobe. Of the 12 patients in whom biopsy was taken from the disconnected frontal lobe, six (50%) had pathology-proven focal cortical dysplasia. We observed surgical-related complications in three (18.8%) cases, neurological deficits in other three (18.8%) patients, and worsening cognitive abilities in one (6.3%) patient. Overall, eight (50%) patients became completely seizure-free (ILAE 1) at one-year follow-up.

Significance: Frontal disconnection surgery for DRE can result in seizure freedom in certain patients, especially when the EZ is strictly limited to the ipsilateral frontal region, and the MRI shows an epileptogenic lesion that is purely frontal in location. Frontal lobe disconnection procedure is safe and has a limited complication rate. However, further studies with larger patient population will yield more significance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/epi4.12424DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7469852PMC
September 2020

Intraoperative direct cortical stimulation motor evoked potentials: Stimulus parameter recommendations based on rheobase and chronaxie.

Clin Neurophysiol 2017 11 28;128(11):2300-2308. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

Section of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Neurosciences, KFSH, Saudi Arabia.

Objective: To determine optimal interstimulus interval (ISI) and pulse duration (D) for direct cortical stimulation (DCS) motor evoked potentials (MEPs) based on rheobase and chronaxie derived with two techniques.

Methods: In 20 patients under propofol/remifentanil anesthesia, 5-pulse DCS thenar MEP rheobase and chronaxie with 2, 3, 4 and 5ms ISI were measured by linear regression of five charge thresholds at 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1msD, and estimated from two charge thresholds at 0.1 and 1msD using simple arithmetic. Optimal parameters were defined by minimum threshold energy: the ISI with lowest rheobase×chronaxie, and D at its chronaxie. Near-optimal was defined as threshold energy <25% above minimum.

Results: The optimal ISI was 3 or 4 (n=7 each), 2 (n=4), or 5ms (n=2), but only 4ms was always either optimal or near-optimal. The optimal D was ∼0.2 (n=12), ∼0.1 (n=7) or ∼0.3ms (n=1). Two-point estimates closely approximated five-point measurements.

Conclusions: Optimal ISI/D varies, with 4ms/0.2ms being most consistently optimal or near-optimal. Two-point estimation is sufficiently accurate.

Significance: The results endorse 4ms ISI and 0.2msD for general use. Two-point estimation could enable quick individual optimization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2017.09.005DOI Listing
November 2017

Letter to the Editor: Arachnoid cyst and the hemorrhagic complications of open decompression.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2015 Nov 24;16(5):607-608. Epub 2015 Jul 24.

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.1.PEDS1552DOI Listing
November 2015

Epilepsy surgery series: a study of 502 consecutive patients from a developing country.

Epilepsy Res Treat 2014 30;2014:286801. Epub 2014 Jan 30.

London Health Science Center, London, ON, Canada N6G 2V4.

Purpose. To review the postoperative seizure outcomes of patients that underwent surgery for epilepsy at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (KFSHRC). Methods. A descriptive retrospective study for 502 patients operated on for medically intractable epilepsy between 1998 and 2012. The surgical outcome was measured using the ILAE criteria. Results. The epilepsy surgery outcome for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery (ILAE classes 1, 2, and 3) at 12, 36, and 60 months is 79.6%, 74.2%, and 67%, respectively. The favorable 12- and 36-month outcomes for frontal lobe epilepsy surgery are 62% and 52%, respectively. For both parietal and occipital epilepsy lobe surgeries the 12- and 36-month outcomes are 67%. For multilobar epilepsy surgery, the 12- and 36-month outcomes are 65% and 50%, respectively. The 12- and 36-month outcomes for functional hemispherectomy epilepsy surgery are 64.2% and 63%, respectively. According to histopathology diagnosis, mesiotemporal sclerosis (MTS) and benign CNS tumors had the best favorable outcome after surgery at 1 year (77.27% and 84.3%, resp.,) and 3 years (76% and 75%, resp.,). The least favorable seizure-free outcome after 3 years occurred in cases with dual pathology (66.6%). Thirty-four epilepsy patients with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans were surgically treated. The first- and third-year epilepsy surgery outcome of 17 temporal lobe surgeries were (53%) and (47%) seizure-free, respectively. The first- and third-year epilepsy surgery outcomes of 15 extratemporal epilepsy surgeries were (47%) and (33%) seizure-free. Conclusion. The best outcomes are achieved with temporal epilepsy surgery, mesial temporal sclerosis, and benign CNS tumor. The worst outcomes are from multilobar surgery, dual pathology, and normal MRI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/286801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929285PMC
March 2014

Response of ictal asystole to pacemaker implantation documented by video-EEG/ECG.

Can J Neurol Sci 2013 Jul;40(4):606-8

Section of Neurology, Department of Neurosciences, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0317167100014773DOI Listing
July 2013