Publications by authors named "Ibai Olariaga"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Considerations and consequences of allowing DNA sequence data as types of fungal taxa.

IMA Fungus 2018 Jun 24;9(1):167-175. Epub 2018 May 24.

Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 16, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden.

Nomenclatural type definitions are one of the most important concepts in biological nomenclature. Being physical objects that can be re-studied by other researchers, types permanently link taxonomy (an artificial agreement to classify biological diversity) with nomenclature (an artificial agreement to name biological diversity). Two proposals to amend the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), allowing DNA sequences alone (of any region and extent) to serve as types of taxon names for voucherless fungi (mainly putative taxa from environmental DNA sequences), have been submitted to be voted on at the 11 International Mycological Congress (Puerto Rico, July 2018). We consider various genetic processes affecting the distribution of alleles among taxa and find that alleles may not consistently and uniquely represent the species within which they are contained. Should the proposals be accepted, the meaning of nomenclatural types would change in a fundamental way from physical objects as sources of data to the data themselves. Such changes are conducive to irreproducible science, the potential typification on artefactual data, and massive creation of names with low information content, ultimately causing nomenclatural instability and unnecessary work for future researchers that would stall future explorations of fungal diversity. We conclude that the acceptance of DNA sequences alone as types of names of taxa, under the terms used in the current proposals, is unnecessary and would not solve the problem of naming putative taxa known only from DNA sequences in a scientifically defensible way. As an alternative, we highlight the use of formulas for naming putative taxa (candidate taxa) that do not require any modification of the ICN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5598/imafungus.2018.09.01.10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6048565PMC
June 2018

Phylogenetic assessment of Chromocyphellaceae (Agaricineae, Basidiomycota) and a new lamellate species of Chromocyphella.

Mycologia 2017 Jul-Aug;109(4):578-587. Epub 2017 Oct 11.

a Departamento de Ciencias de la Vida (Botánica), Facultad de Biología , Universidad de Alcalá , E-28805 Alcalá de Henares , Madrid , Spain.

Cyphelloid fungi represent a polyphyletic assemblage of reduced agarics, including the brown-spored family Chromocyphellaceae. In order to elucidate the phylogenetic position of Chromocyphellaceae, newly generated sequences of Chromocyphella were included in a multigene alignment of the Agaricineae and phylogenetically analyzed. The current analyses show that the Chromocyphella muscicola specimen used to phylogenetically place Chromocyphellaceae in its original description was misidentified and that the Chromocyphellaceae nests in the Hymenogastraceae, Chromocyphella being sister to Flammula. Chromocyphella is emended, including now a new species with lamellate and stipitate basidiomata, C. lamellata. The name Cymbella crouanii, type species of Chromocyphella, is lecto- and epitypified. Our analyses support a new origin of cyphelloid fungi. The shift to a cyphelloid basidioma from an agaric ancestor is suggested to have occurred in two evolutionary steps in Chromocyphella, an initial reduction in basidioma size and a subsequent loss of lamellae and stipe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00275514.2017.1377586DOI Listing
November 2018

and the Teichosporaceae.

Mycol Prog 2016;15:31. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Division of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, 1030 Wien, Austria.

A multigene analysis of a combined ITS, LSU, SSU, and sequence data matrix was applied to infer the phylogenetic position of the genus in the Pleosporales, based on isolates from freshly collected material of the generic type and several additional species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that and are synonyms of . All species of these genera and several species recently described in the genus belong to and are thus combined in this genus. Also, and are combined in . The new name is established for . Three new species, , and , are described, and an expanded description of is given. The family Teichosporaceae is currently confined to , which can be phylogenetically clearly separated from , the type genus of the Lophiostomataceae. The family name Floricolaceae is a synonym of Teichosporaceae. All species described here form apically free paraphyses among immature asci. This finding contradicts the current general dogma that apically free paraphyses are absent in the Pleosporales and questions the wide use of the term pseudoparaphysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11557-016-1171-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4789301PMC
March 2016

Unraveling the Inocybe praetervisa group through type studies and ITS data: Inocybe praetervisoides sp. nov. from the Mediterranean region.

Mycologia 2016 Jan-Feb;108(1):123-34. Epub 2015 Nov 9.

Department of Life Sciences (Botany Unit), University of Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain.

Species in the Inocybe praetervisa group are characterized by producing nodulose to angular basidiospores and a bulbous, marginate, white stipe devoid of any pinkish to reddish tinge. Species delimitation problems and common misinterpretations in the I. praetervisa group have not yet been resolved through type studies and analysis of molecular data. This study seeks to clarify the taxonomy and nomenclature of species around I. praetervisa. Analyses of the nuc rDNA internal transcribed regions (ITS) recovered two major groups within the I. praetervisa group that can be separated on the basis of cystidial morphology. The study of three authentic and topotypic specimens in the Bresadola herbarium revealed that the name I. praetervisa has been misapplied often. The ITS region of one of the specimens was obtained, and this specimen is designated as epitype in support of a lectotype. Inocybe rivularis is demonstrated to be a later synonym of I. praetervisa, while Inocybe phaeocystidiosa is the correct name for the species most often misdetermined as I. praetervisa. Inocybe salicis-herbaceae and I. praetervisa var. flavofulvida are shown to be synonyms of I. phaeocystidiosa based on ITS sequence data from type collections. A new species sister to I. phaeocystidiosa with a Mediterranean distribution is described as I. praetervisoides. Cystidial morphology, distribution of caulocystidia, basidiospore morphology and ecology are shown to be the main diagnostic characters for separating the species. Inocybe praetervisa and I. phaeocystidiosa have a transoceanic distribution in Europe and North America, whereas I. praetervisoides so far is known only from the Mediterranean region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/15-053DOI Listing
May 2016

Two new species of Thyronectria from Mediterranean Europe.

Mycologia 2015 Nov-Dec;107(6):1314-22. Epub 2015 Sep 9.

Division of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, A-1030 Vienna, Austria.

Two new species of Thyronectria growing in Mediterranean vegetation are described from southern Spain; they are T. giennensis from Quercus ilex ssp. rotundifolia and T. pistaciae from Pistacia lentiscus. Both species are characterized by morphology of sexual and asexual morphs and by DNA data. They have olivaceous to green-brown muriform ascospores and are closely related to T. asturiensis and T. roseovirens, as determined by multigene phylogenetic analyses of a matrix containing six loci (ITS and 28S regions of nuc rDNA, ACT1, RPB1, RPB2, TEF1 and TUB2 genes). We also report that Cucurbitaria bicolor is a synonym of Thyronectria rhodochlora, the type species of Thyronectria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/15-116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321527PMC
March 2016

Taxonomy and phylogeny of yellow Clavaria species with clamped basidia-Clavaria flavostellifera sp. nov. and the typification of C. argillacea, C. flavipes and C. sphagnicola.

Mycologia 2015 Jan-Feb;107(1):104-22. Epub 2014 Nov 6.

Slovak National Museum-Natural History Museum, Vajanského nábr. 2, P.O. Box 13, 810 06 Bratislava, Slovakia.

This study explores species limits of a group of Clavaria species with taxonomic and nomenclatural problems and discusses the phylogeny and circumscription of the genus. The nuc 28S rDNA (28S) and internal transcribed spacer region phylogenies resolve species relationships, and the ITS is shown to be an adequate barcode marker for Clavaria. Yellow, clamped species of Clavaria are distributed in two clades, (i) C. flavostellifera, sister to C. incarnata and C. asterospora in ITS analyses, characterized by producing ornamented spores, and (ii) C. argillacea-C. citrinorubra-C. flavipes-C. sphagnicola, with smooth spores. Clavaria flavostellifera is described as new species based on morphological and molecular characters. Molecular evidence that supports C. sphagnicola as distinct from C. argillacea is provided. The usefulness of spore ornamentation as a taxonomic character is discussed; it is present only in some taxa and then only on spores trapped in the hymenium. Descriptions of C. argillacea, C. flavipes and C. sphagnicola are provided, along with color photographs and a key to yellow species of Clavaria with clamped basidia. Camarophyllopsis and Clavicorona are recovered within a paraphyletic Clavaria in our 28S phylogeny. Clampless contextual hyphae and narrow, slightly thick-walled mycelial hyphae are proposed as synapomorphies of Camarophyllopsis and Clavaria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/13-315DOI Listing
March 2015

Finding needles in haystacks: linking scientific names, reference specimens and molecular data for Fungi.

Database (Oxford) 2014 30;2014. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, P.O. Box 85167, 3508 AD Utrecht, The Netherlands, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Microbiology, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, Molecular Mycology Research Laboratory, Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Sydney Medical School-Westmead Hospital, The University of Sydney, Westmead Millennium Institute, Westmead, Australia, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 461, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37920, USA, Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, 1816 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820, USA, Mycology Section, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3DS, UK, Natural History Museum, University of Tartu, 46 Vanemuise, 51014 Tartu, Estonia, Purdue University, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 915 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA, Institute of Excellence in Fungal Research, and School of Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai 57100, Thailand, Imperial College London, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew TW9 3DS, England, UK, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Dépt. Systématique et Evolution CP39, UMR7205, 12 Rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris, France, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, Yunnan, P. R. China, Departamento de Biología Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040, Spain, Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, PF 300 154, 02806 Görlitz, Germany, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Forestry Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI), University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa, Real Jardín Botánico, RJB-CSIC,

DNA phylogenetic comparisons have shown that morphology-based species recognition often underestimates fungal diversity. Therefore, the need for accurate DNA sequence data, tied to both correct taxonomic names and clearly annotated specimen data, has never been greater. Furthermore, the growing number of molecular ecology and microbiome projects using high-throughput sequencing require fast and effective methods for en masse species assignments. In this article, we focus on selecting and re-annotating a set of marker reference sequences that represent each currently accepted order of Fungi. The particular focus is on sequences from the internal transcribed spacer region in the nuclear ribosomal cistron, derived from type specimens and/or ex-type cultures. Re-annotated and verified sequences were deposited in a curated public database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), namely the RefSeq Targeted Loci (RTL) database, and will be visible during routine sequence similarity searches with NR_prefixed accession numbers. A set of standards and protocols is proposed to improve the data quality of new sequences, and we suggest how type and other reference sequences can be used to improve identification of Fungi. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA177353.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/database/bau061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4075928PMC
February 2015

Two new species of Hydnum with ovoid basidiospores: H. ovoideisporum and H. vesterholtii.

Mycologia 2012 Nov-Dec;104(6):1443-55. Epub 2012 Jun 8.

Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain.

Two new species of Hydnum, characterized by slender Hydnum rufescens-like basidiomes and ovoid to broadly ellipsoid basidiospores, are described from the Iberian Peninsula based on morphological and ITS molecular data. Hydnum ovoideisporum is distinguished by pilei with deep orange tones and strong preference for calcareous soil. It is widespread in the Iberian-Mediterranean area. Hydnum vesterholtii is characterized by its ocher to light ocher pileus, and nearly all the collections were made in the Pyrenees. Both ovoid-spored species are monophyletic well supported groups in the maximum parsimony and Bayesian ITS phylogenies, while the remainder of the samples assigned to H. rufescens s.l. and having globose basidiospores split into six well supported clades. The need to typify the name Hydnum rufescens is discussed, and a provisional key is given for the European taxa of Hydnum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3852/11-378DOI Listing
June 2014

Species delimitation in the European species of Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) inferred from phylogenetic analyses of ITS region and morphological data.

Mycol Res 2009 Nov 18;113(Pt 11):1261-70. Epub 2009 Aug 18.

Dept. Plant Biology and Ecology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain.

The identification of the conventionally accepted species of Clavulina (Cantharellales, Basidiomycota) in Europe (Clavulina amethystina, Clavulina cinerea, Clavulina cristata, and Clavulina rugosa) is often difficult and many specimens are not straightforwardly assignable to any of those four species, which is why some authors have questioned their identity. In order to assess the status of those species, a morphological examination was combined with the molecular analysis of the ITS region. The same six major clades were obtained in the Bayesian and parsimony phylogenetic analyses, and all six clades were well-supported at least by one of the analyses. Morphological characters, such as the overall branching pattern, the presence and intensity of grey colour, the cristation of the apices, and basidiospore size and shape were to various extents correlated with the phylogenetic signal obtained from the ITS region. The congruence between the molecular analyses and morphology, rather than geographical origin, suggests the existence of several species that can be delimited using a combined phylogenetic and morphological species recognition. The analyses revealed that C. cristata and C. rugosa are well-delimited species. In contrast, more than one taxa could be subsumed under the names C. amethystina and C. cinerea, the taxonomical complexity of which is discussed. The ITS region is proved to be adequate to separate phylogenetic species of Clavulina.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mycres.2009.08.008DOI Listing
November 2009
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