Publications by authors named "Ian Masse"

4 Publications

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Efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on the acute neurochemical response to a concussion in a rat model combining force and rotation.

J Neurosurg 2021 Oct 15:1-10. Epub 2021 Oct 15.

1Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal; and.

Objective: Alterations in amino acid concentrations are a major contributor to the persistent neurological and behavioral effects induced by concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory amino acid in the CNS, has a major role in the pathophysiological process of concussion. The indiscriminate liberation of glutamate immediately after a concussion triggers an excitotoxic response that leads to cell death, neuronal damage, and the dysfunction of surviving neurons, largely by overactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of MK-801, a promising NMDA receptor antagonist, on the acute changes in amino acid extracellular concentrations involved in excitotoxicity resulting from a concussive trauma.

Methods: The immediate neurochemical response to a concussion cannot be characterized in humans. Therefore, the authors used their previously validated combination of a weight-drop concussion rat model and in vivo cerebral microdialysis. The microdialysis probe was inserted inside the hippocampus and left inserted at impact to allow uninterrupted sampling of amino acids of interest immediately after concussion. The primary outcome included amino acid concentrations and the secondary outcome included righting time. Samples were taken in 10-minute increments for 60 minutes before, during, and 60 minutes after impact, and analyzed for glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine, glycine, glutamine, and serine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Righting time was acquired as a neurological restoration indicator. Physiological saline or 10 mg/kg MK-801 was administrated intraperitoneally 60 minutes before or immediately following induction of sham injury or concussion.

Results: Following induction of concussion, glutamate, taurine, and glycine levels as well as righting times in cases from the MK-801 treatment group were comparable to those of vehicle-treated animals. In contrast, righting times and amino acid concentrations observed within the first 10 minutes after induction of concussion in cases assigned to the MK-801 prophylaxis group were comparable to those of sham-injured animals.

Conclusions: These results suggest that presynaptic actions and peak availability of MK-801 following prophylactic administration significantly inhibit the immediate and indiscriminate release of glutamate, taurine, and glycine in extracellular fluid after a concussion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2021.3.JNS204163DOI Listing
October 2021

A Novel and Translational Rat Model of Concussion Combining Force and Rotation with In Vivo Cerebral Microdialysis.

J Vis Exp 2019 07 12(149). Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal.

Persistent cognitive and motor symptoms are known consequences of concussions/mild traumatic brain injury (mTBIs) that can be partly attributable to altered neurotransmission. Indeed, cerebral microdialysis studies in rodents have demonstrated an excessive extracellular glutamate release in the hippocampus within the first 10 min following trauma. Microdialysis offers the clear advantage of in vivo neurotransmitter continuous sampling while not having to sacrifice the animal. In addition to the aforementioned technique, a closed head injury model that exerts rapid acceleration and deceleration of the head and torso is needed, as such a factor is not available in many other animal models. The Wayne State weight-drop model mimics this essential component of human craniocerebral trauma, allowing the induction of an impact on the head of an unrestrained rodent with a falling weight. Our novel and translational rat model combines cerebral microdialysis with the Wayne State weight-drop model to study, in lightly anesthetized and unrestrained adult rats, the acute changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels following concussion. In this protocol, the microdialysis probe was inserted inside the hippocampus as region of interest, and was left inserted in the brain at impact. There is a high density of terminals and receptors in the hippocampus, making it a relevant region to document altered neurotransmission following concussion. When applied to adult Sprague-Dawley rats, our combined model induced increases in hippocampal extracellular glutamate concentrations within the first 10 min, consistent with the previously reported post-concussion symptomology. This combined weight-drop model provides a reliable tool for researchers to study early therapeutic responses to concussions in addition to repetitive brain injury, since this protocol induces a closed-head mild trauma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/59585DOI Listing
July 2019

Asymmetric Direct Reciprocal Connections Between Primary Visual and Somatosensory Cortices of the Mouse.

Cereb Cortex 2017 09;27(9):4361-4378

Département d'anatomie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, CanadaG9A 2W7.

Several studies show direct connections between primary sensory cortices involved in multisensory integration. The purpose of this study is to understand the microcircuitry of the reciprocal connections between visual and somatosensory cortices. The laminar distribution of retrogradely labeled cell bodies in V1 and in the somatosensory cortex both in (S1BF) and outside (S1) the barrel field was studied to provide layer indices in order to determine whether the connections are of feedforward, feedback or lateral type. Single axons were reconstructed and the size of their swellings was stereologically sampled. The negative layer indices in S1 and S1BF and the layer index near zero in V1 indicate that the connection from S1BF to V1 is of feedback type while the opposite is of lateral type. The greater incidence of larger axonal swellings in the projection from V1 to S1BF strongly suggests that S1BF receives a stronger driver input from V1 and that S1BF inputs to V1 have a predominant modulatory influence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhw239DOI Listing
September 2017

Strain differences of the effect of enucleation and anophthalmia on the size and growth of sensory cortices in mice.

Brain Res 2014 Nov 19;1588:113-26. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Département d׳anatomie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada G9A 5H7; École d׳optométrie, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3J7. Electronic address:

Anophthalmia is a condition in which the eye does not develop from the early embryonic period. Early blindness induces cross-modal plastic modifications in the brain such as auditory and haptic activations of the visual cortex and also leads to a greater solicitation of the somatosensory and auditory cortices. The visual cortex is activated by auditory stimuli in anophthalmic mice and activity is known to alter the growth pattern of the cerebral cortex. The size of the primary visual, auditory and somatosensory cortices and of the corresponding specific sensory thalamic nuclei were measured in intact and enucleated C57Bl/6J mice and in ZRDCT anophthalmic mice (ZRDCT/An) to evaluate the contribution of cross-modal activity on the growth of the cerebral cortex. In addition, the size of these structures were compared in intact, enucleated and anophthalmic fourth generation backcrossed hybrid C57Bl/6J×ZRDCT/An mice to parse out the effects of mouse strains and of the different visual deprivations. The visual cortex was smaller in the anophthalmic ZRDCT/An than in the intact and enucleated C57Bl/6J mice. Also the auditory cortex was larger and the somatosensory cortex smaller in the ZRDCT/An than in the intact and enucleated C57Bl/6J mice. The size differences of sensory cortices between the enucleated and anophthalmic mice were no longer present in the hybrid mice, showing specific genetic differences between C57Bl/6J and ZRDCT mice. The post natal size increase of the visual cortex was less in the enucleated than in the anophthalmic and intact hybrid mice. This suggests differences in the activity of the visual cortex between enucleated and anophthalmic mice and that early in-utero spontaneous neural activity in the visual system contributes to the shaping of functional properties of cortical networks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2014.09.025DOI Listing
November 2014
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