Publications by authors named "Ian Leonard-Lorant"

10 Publications

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Safety and oncologic efficacy of percutaneous MRI-guided cryoablation of intraparenchymal renal cancers.

Diagn Interv Imaging 2021 Apr 27. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, 67091 Strasbourg cedex, France; School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London, Strand, WC2R 2LS London, United Kingdom.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and oncologic efficacy of percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cryoablation of intraparenchymal renal cancer.

Materials And Methods: Between February 2009 and August 2019, 31 consecutives patients with 31 entirely intraparenchymal biopsy-proven renal cancers were treated with cryoablation under MRI-guidance in our institution, and were retrospectively included. There were 20 men and 11 women with a mean age of 68.5±12.5 (SD) (range: 40-91years). Patient, tumor- and procedure-related, and follow-up data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Local recurrence free (LRFS), metastasis free (MFS), disease free (DFS), cancer specific (CSS), and overall survivals (OS) were calculated.

Results: Primary and secondary technical efficacy rates were 94% and 100%, respectively. Median follow-up was 27months. Seven (7/31; 23%) minor complications were noted in 7 patients. Patients showed a significant decline of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) between baseline and nadir (mean basal eGFR 65.9±22.4 [SD] mL/min/1.73mvs. mean nadir eGFR 52.8±26.0 [SD] mL/min/1.73m; P<0.001), but only two showed a clinically significant renal function decline. Three-year estimates of primary and secondary LRFS, MFS, and DFS were 64% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 47-87%), 89% (95% CI: 78-99%), 83% (95% CI: 77-98%), and 45% (95% CI: 28-73%), respectively. No patients died due to renal cancer evolution (three-year CSS of 100%; 95% CI: 100-100%). One patient died 52months after the percutaneous treatment due to cryoablation-unrelated causes (three-year OS of 100%; 95% CI: 100-100%).

Conclusion: MRI-guided percutaneous cryoablation for intraparenchymal renal cancer offers good oncologic outcomes with acceptable complication rates and renal function worsening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diii.2021.04.002DOI Listing
April 2021

Percutaneous thermal ablation of sacral metastases: Assessment of pain relief and local tumor control.

Diagn Interv Imaging 2021 Jan 21. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France; School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London, Strand, WC2R 2LS London, United Kingdom.

Purpose: To retrospectively report on safety, pain relief and local tumor control achieved with percutaneous ablation of sacral bone metastases.

Materials And Methods: From February 2009 to June 2020, 23 consecutive patients (12 women and 11 men; mean age, 60±8 [SD] years; median, 60; range: 48-80 years) with 23 sacral metastases underwent radiofrequency (RFA) or cryo-ablation (CA), with palliative or curative intent at our institution. Patients' demographics and data pertaining to treated metastases, procedure-related variables, safety, and clinical evolution following ablation were collected and analyzed. Pain was assessed with numerical pain rating scale (NPRS).

Results: Sixteen (70%) patients were treated with palliative and 7 (30%) with curative intent. Mean tumor diameter was 38±19 (SD) mm (median, 36; range: 11-76). External radiation therapy had been performed on five metastases (5/23; 22%) prior to ablation. RFA was used in 9 (39%) metastases and CA in the remaining 14 (61%). Thermo-protective measures and adjuvant bone consolidation were used whilst treating 20 (87%) and 8 (35%) metastases, respectively. Five (22%) minor complications were recorded. At mean 31±21 (SD) (median, 32; range: 2-70) months follow-up mean NPRS was 2±2 (SD) (median, 1; range: 0-6) vs. 5±1 (median, 5; range: 4-8; P<0.001) at the baseline. Three metastases out of 7 (43%) undergoing curative ablation showed local progression at mean 4±4 (SD) (median, 2; range: 1-8) months follow-up.

Conclusion: Percutaneous ablation of sacral metastases is safe and results in significant long-lasting pain relief. Local tumor control seems sub-optimal; however, further investigations are needed to confirm these findings due to paucity of data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diii.2020.12.008DOI Listing
January 2021

Normal chest CT in 1091 symptomatic patients with confirmed Covid-19: frequency, characteristics and outcome.

Eur Radiol 2021 Jan 13. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 1 place de l'Hôpital, 67000, Strasbourg, France.

Objective: Frequency of normal chest CT in symptomatic COVID-19 patients as well as the outcome of these patients remains unknown. The objectives of this work were to assess the incidence of initially normal chest CT in a cohort of consecutive confirmed COVID-19 patients with respiratory symptoms and to compare their clinical characteristics and their outcome to matched patients with typical COVID-19 lesions at initial CT.

Methods: From March 6 to April 22, all consecutive adult patients referred to the COVID-19 clinic of our Emergency Department were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient with a positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR and a normal initial chest CT after second reading was 1:1 matched based on sex, age and date of CT acquisition to a patient with positive RT-PCR and initial chest CT with typical COVID-19 lesions. Clinical data, laboratory results and outcomes (major being mechanical ventilation and/or death) were compared between both groups, using Wilcoxon signed-rank test, McNemar's chi-squared test and/or exact McNemar's test where appropriate.

Results: Fifty-seven chest CT out of 1091 (5.2%, 95% CI 4.0-6.7) in symptomatic patients with positive RT-PCR were normal, with a median onset of symptoms of 4.5 days (IQR [1.25-10.25]). After a median follow-up of 43 days, death and/or mechanical ventilation occurred in 3 patients (5.3%) in the study group, versus 11 (19.3%) in the control group (p = 0.011).

Conclusions: Normal initial chest CT occurred in 5.2% of symptomatic confirmed COVID-19 cases in our cohort. While better than those with abnormal chest CT, outcome was not entirely benign with 5.3% death and/or mechanical ventilation.

Key Points: • In a cohort of 1091 symptomatic COVID-19 patients, initial chest CT was normal in 5.2% of cases. • Normal chest CT in confirmed COVID-19 is frequent even when onset of symptoms is greater than 3 days. • The outcome of COVID-19 patients with initial normal chest CT, while better than those with abnormal CT, was not entirely benign with 5.3% death and/or mechanical ventilation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-07593-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7804574PMC
January 2021

D-Dimers Level as a Possible Marker of Extravascular Fibrinolysis in COVID-19 Patients.

J Clin Med 2020 Dec 24;10(1). Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

Background And Objective: Host defence mechanisms to counter virus infection include the activation of the broncho-alveolar haemostasis. Fibrin degradation products secondary to extravascular fibrin breakdown could contribute to the marked increase in D-Dimers during COVID-19. We sought to examine the prognostic value on lung injury of D-Dimers in non-critically ill COVID-19 patients without thrombotic events.

Methods: This study retrospectively analysed hospitalized COVID-19 patients classified according to a D-Dimers threshold following the COVID-19 associated haemostatic abnormalities (CAHA) classification at baseline and at peak (Stage 1: D-Dimers less than three-fold above normal; Stage 2: D-Dimers three- to six-fold above normal; Stage 3: D-Dimers six-fold above normal). The primary endpoint was the occurrence of critical lung injuries on chest computed tomography. The secondary outcome was the composite of in-hospital death or transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU).

Results: Among the 123 patients included, critical lung injuries were evidenced in 8 (11.9%) patients in Stage 1, 6 (20%) in Stage 2 and 15 (57.7%) in Stage 3 ( = 0.001). D-Dimers staging at peak was an independent predictor of critical lung injuries regardless of the inflammatory burden assessed by CRP levels (OR 2.70, 95% CI (1.50-4.86); < 0.001) and was significantly associated with increased in-hospital death or ICU transfer (14.9 % in Stage 1, 50.0% in Stage 2 and 57.7% in Stage 3 ( < 0.001)). D-Dimers staging at peak was an independent predictor of in-hospital death or ICU transfer (OR 2.50, CI 95% (1.27-4.93); = 0.008).

Conclusions: In the absence of overt thrombotic events, D-Dimers quantification is a relevant marker of critical lung injuries and dismal patient outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10010039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7795726PMC
December 2020

Safety and Oncologic Outcomes of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Cryoablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A 10-Year Single-Center Experience.

Invest Radiol 2021 Mar;56(3):153-162

From the Departments of Interventional Radiology.

Objectives: Magnetic resonance imaging guidance has been sporadically reported for renal tumor cryoablation (CA); therefore, clinical experience with this modality is still limited.The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze our 10-year experience with renal tumor CA performed on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging unit with the intent of reporting procedural safety and oncologic outcomes.

Materials And Methods: We included 143 patients (102 men; 41 women; median age, 73 years; range, 34-91 years) with 149 tumors (median size, 2.6 cm; range, 0.6-6.0 cm), treated between 2009 and 2019. Patient, tumor, procedure, and follow-up data were collected and analyzed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate local recurrence-free (LRFS), metastasis-free (MFS), disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific, and overall (OS) survival. Univariate and multivariate models were used to identify factors associated with complications, LRFS, MFS, DFS, and OS.

Results: The overall complication rate was 10.7% (16/149 tumors), with 1 major (1/149 [0.7%]; 95% confidence interval, 0.0%-3.7%) hemorrhagic complication. Other minor complications (15/149 [10.1%]; 95% confidence interval, 0.6%-16.1%) did not include any cases of injury to nearby organs. There were no factors associated with complications.Five-year estimates of LRFS (primary/secondary), MFS, DFS, cancer-specific survival, and OS were 82.8%/91.5%, 91.1%, 75.1%, 98.2%, and 89.6%, respectively. Increasing tumor size (hazard radio [HR], 1.8; P = 0.02) and intraparenchymal tumor location (HR, 5.6; P < 0.01) were associated with lower LRFS; increasing patient's age (HR, 0.5; P = 0.01), high tumor grade (HR, 23.3; P < 0.01) and non-clear-cell/nonpapillary histology (HR, 20.1; P < 0.01) with metastatic disease; and high tumor grade (HR, 3.2; P = 0.04) with lower DFS.

Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided CA of renal tumors is associated with acceptable morbidity and high survival estimates at 5-year follow-up. Given the absence of complications resulting from injuries to nearby organs, further studies are required to evaluate whether the potential reduced incidence of these adverse events justifies large-scale implementation of this interventional modality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0000000000000719DOI Listing
March 2021

Staging Severity of COVID-19 according to Hemostatic Abnormalities (CAHA Score).

Thromb Haemost 2020 Dec 30;120(12):1716-1719. Epub 2020 Aug 30.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.

This is the first study to show a stepwise increase in venous thrombotic events according to COVID-19 coagulopathy (COVID-19-associated hemostatic abnormalities [CAHA]) staging and lung injuries assessed by chest computed tomography. Excess mortality and/or transfer to intensive care unit according to CAHA staging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1715836DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7869051PMC
December 2020

Venous thromboembolism in non-critically ill patients with COVID-19 infection.

Thromb Res 2020 09 17;193:166-169. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France; INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research), UMR 1260, Regenerative Nanomedicine, FMTS, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2020.07.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7367026PMC
September 2020

Coronavirus Disease 2019: Associated Multiple Organ Damage.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2020 Jul 21;7(7):ofaa249. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Service d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

A 56-year-old man presented a particularly severe and multisystemic case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition to the common lung and quite common pulmonary embolism and kidney injuries, he presented ocular and intestinal injuries that, to our knowledge, have not been described in COVID-19 patients. Although it is difficult to make pathophysiological hypotheses about a single case, the multiplicity of injured organs argues for a systemic response to pulmonary infection. A better understanding of physiopathology should feed the discussion about therapeutic options in this type of multifocal damage related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofaa249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7336548PMC
July 2020

High risk of thrombosis in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection: a multicenter prospective cohort study.

Intensive Care Med 2020 06 4;46(6):1089-1098. Epub 2020 May 4.

Service de Médecine Intensive Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, 1, Place de l'Hôpital, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France.

Purpose: Little evidence of increased thrombotic risk is available in COVID-19 patients. Our purpose was to assess thrombotic risk in severe forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Methods: All patients referred to 4 intensive care units (ICUs) from two centers of a French tertiary hospital for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID-19 between March 3rd and 31st 2020 were included. Medical history, symptoms, biological data and imaging were prospectively collected. Propensity score matching was performed to analyze the occurrence of thromboembolic events between non-COVID-19 ARDS and COVID-19 ARDS patients.

Results: 150 COVID-19 patients were included (122 men, median age 63 [53; 71] years, SAPSII 49 [37; 64] points). Sixty-four clinically relevant thrombotic complications were diagnosed in 150 patients, mainly pulmonary embolisms (16.7%). 28/29 patients (96.6%) receiving continuous renal replacement therapy experienced circuit clotting. Three thrombotic occlusions (in 2 patients) of centrifugal pump occurred in 12 patients (8%) supported by ECMO. Most patients (> 95%) had elevated D-dimer and fibrinogen. No patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation. Von Willebrand (vWF) activity, vWF antigen and FVIII were considerably increased, and 50/57 tested patients (87.7%) had positive lupus anticoagulant. Comparison with non-COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 145) confirmed that COVID-19 ARDS patients (n = 77) developed significantly more thrombotic complications, mainly pulmonary embolisms (11.7 vs. 2.1%, p < 0.008). Coagulation parameters significantly differed between the two groups.

Conclusion: Despite anticoagulation, a high number of patients with ARDS secondary to COVID-19 developed life-threatening thrombotic complications. Higher anticoagulation targets than in usual critically ill patients should therefore probably be suggested.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-020-06062-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7197634PMC
June 2020

Acute Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with COVID-19 at CT Angiography and Relationship to d-Dimer Levels.

Radiology 2020 09 23;296(3):E189-E191. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 1 place de l'Hôpital, 67000, Strasbourg, France (I.L.L., A.L., P.L., C.R., M.O.); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Réanimation Polyvalente, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (X.D., C.P., O.C.); Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, Groupe Méthodes en Recherche Clinique (GMRC), Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (F. Séverac); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Médecine Intensive et Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (J.H.); ImmunoRhumatologie Moléculaire, INSERM UMR_S1109, LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, Faculté de Médecine, Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire (FHU) OMICARE, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), Université de Strasbourg (UNISTRA), Strasbourg, France (J.H.); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Médecine Intensive-Réanimation, Hôpital de Hautepierre I, Strasbourg, France (F. Schneider); Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'Accueil des Urgences, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg, France (P.B.); and Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, Hôpital de Hautepierre I, Strasbourg, France (S.M.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020201561DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7233397PMC
September 2020