Publications by authors named "I Leal"

268 Publications

Hesperidin reduces dentin wear after erosion and erosion/abrasion cycling in vitro.

Arch Oral Biol 2021 Jul 19;129:105208. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing, Federal University of Ceará, Rua Monsenhor Furtado, s/nº, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate the action of hesperidin (HPN) at different concentrations to prevent dentin erosive wear, associated or not to abrasion.

Methods: A study with 6 experimental groups (n = 10) for erosion (experiment 1) and another 6 for erosion + abrasion (experiment 2). The treatments were: distilled water (DW), DW with collagenase (DW + Col), 0.46% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and 0.1%, 0.5% or 1% HPN. The specimens were submitted to a cycle (3x/day) for 5 days that consisted of immersion on 1% citric acid (5 min), artificial saliva (60 min), treatment (5 min), brushing (150 movements only in experiment 2), and artificial saliva (60 min / overnight). Collagenase was added in artificial saliva for all groups except DW-group. Dentin changes were assessed with optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. Data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α = 0.05).

Results: For experiment 1, DW showed the lowest wear and did not significantly differ from EGCG. DW + Col showed the highest wear, being significantly different from HPN at 1%. In experiment 2, DW showed the lowest wear and DW + Col the highest. EGCG showed less wear than the three groups treated with HPN. In addition, for both cycling models, there were no significant differences among the three concentrations of HPN analyzed. In micrographs of HPN-treated groups, it could be observed the formation of a barrier on the dentin that promoted the obliteration of the tubules.

Conclusions: HPN was able to preserve the demineralized organic matrix layer but did not overcome the effect of EGCG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archoralbio.2021.105208DOI Listing
July 2021

Plastome evolution in the Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae) and its application in phylogenomics and populations genetics.

Planta 2021 Jul 8;254(2):27. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Laboratory of Plant Cytogenetics and Evolution, Department of Botany, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

Main Conclusion: The chloroplast genomes of Caesalpinia group species are structurally conserved, but sequence level variation is useful for both phylogenomic and population genetic analyses. Variation in chloroplast genomes (plastomes) has been an important source of information in plant biology. The Caesalpinia group has been used as a model in studies correlating ecological and genomic variables, yet its intergeneric and infrageneric relationships are not fully solved, despite densely sampled phylogenies including nuclear and plastid loci by Sanger sequencing. Here, we present the de novo assembly and characterization of plastomes from 13 species from the Caesalpinia group belonging to eight genera. A comparative analysis was carried out with 13 other plastomes previously available, totalizing 26 plastomes and representing 15 of the 26 known Caesalpinia group genera. All plastomes showed a conserved quadripartite structure and gene repertoire, except for the loss of four ndh genes in Erythrostemon gilliesii. Thirty polymorphic regions were identified for inter- or intrageneric analyses. The 26 aligned plastomes were used for phylogenetic reconstruction, revealing a well-resolved topology, and dividing the Caesalpinia group into two fully supported clades. Sixteen microsatellite (cpSSR) loci were selected from Cenostigma microphyllum for primer development and at least two were cross-amplified in different Leguminosae subfamilies by in vitro or in silico approaches. Four loci were used to assess the genetic diversity of C. microphyllum in the Brazilian Caatinga. Our results demonstrate the structural conservation of plastomes in the Caesalpinia group, offering insights into its systematics and evolution, and provides new genomic tools for future phylogenetic, population genetics, and phylogeographic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-021-03655-8DOI Listing
July 2021

Topical corticosteroids with topical cyclosporine A versus topical corticosteroids alone for immunological corneal graft rejection.

Eur J Ophthalmol 2021 Jul 7:11206721211023320. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Ophthalmology Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Universitário Lisboa Norte, Lisboa, Portugal.

Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of supplementing topical cyclosporine A (CsA) to topical corticosteroids (CS), in the prophylaxis and treatment of corneal graft rejection following penetrating keratoplasty (PK).

Methods: Meta-analysis. Search was performed in PubMed, CENTRAL, ClinicalTrials.gov, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings. Primary outcomes: 1-year rejection-free survival rate (prophylaxis); resolution rate of rejection episodes (treatment). Secondary outcomes: 6- and 24-month rejection-free graft survival rate, number of rejection episodes during follow-up, time-to-resolution of rejection episode, 12- and 24-months graft survival rate, adverse events. Subgroup analyses were planned for high-risk grafts; primary vs. secondary prophylaxis of graft rejection episodes; and CsA concentrations of 0.05%, 1%, and 2%.

Results: Five studies of moderate methodological quality were included (one retrospective, four RCT), assessing 459 eyes (CS + CsA 226, CS 233). In the prophylaxis setting, supplemental CsA was associated with a higher rejection-free survival rate at 12-months (RR 1.25, 95% CI: 1.00-1.56,  = 0.05) and 24-months post-PK (RR 1.56, 95% CI: 1.15-2.11,  < 0.01), though no differences were found at the 6-months timepoint ( = 0.93). This effect was mostly verified using CsA 2% in the high-risk subset of patients. In the treatment setting, no differences were found in the resolution rate of rejection episodes ( = 0.23). No differences existed on drug-related adverse events.

Conclusion: In the prophylaxis of rejection episodes post-PK, the combined regimen of CS + CsA was associated with a higher 1- and 2-year rejection-free graft survival rate. Subgroup analysis mostly supported the use of CsA 2% for high-risk grafts. Further studies are needed to validate these results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/11206721211023320DOI Listing
July 2021

Different Placement Practices for Different Families? Children's Adjustment in LGH Adoptive Families.

Front Psychol 2021 18;12:649853. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

University Institute of Psychological, Social and Life Sciences (ISPA), Lisbon, Portugal.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of children placed with lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adopters, and to examine children's problem behaviors and positive psychosocial adjustment across the three family types.

Background: There is evidence that children with hard-to-place profiles may be more likely to be matched with lesbian and gay parents. In addition, children adopted from care face greater developmental difficulties than children raised by their birth families, although adoptive parents may buffer the negative effects of early adversity on their children's psychosocial adjustment.

Method: A final sample of 149 adoptive families from across the United Kingdom was recruited: 71 heterosexual parented, 39 lesbian parented, and 39 gay parented.

Results: The results showed that gay and lesbian parents were more likely than heterosexual parents to be matched with hard-to-place children, partially because they were more open to being matched with children with hard-to-place profiles. However, no differences among the three family types on children's psychosocial adjustment were found, when controlling for children's early adversity.

Conclusion: Adopted children displayed similar levels of problem behaviors and positive adjustment in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual parented families. Early adversity and having a physical problem/disability accounted for much of the variance in problem behaviors whereas parenting did not. In contrast, it was suggested that parenting processes, namely, parental closeness, may help to explain children's positive adjustment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.649853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8253556PMC
June 2021

Toxicity and larvicidal activity on Aedes aegypti of citronella essential oil submitted to enzymatic esterification.

Braz J Biol 2021 28;83:e244647. Epub 2021 Jun 28.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia de Alimentos, Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missões - URI Erechim, Erechim, RS, Brasil.

The essential oil of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) has several biological activities, among them the insect repellent action. Some studies showed that cinnamic acid esters can be applied as natural pesticides, insecticides and fungicides. In this context, the objective of the present work was to evaluate the production of esters from citronella essential oil with cinnamic acid via enzymatic esterification. Besides, the essential oil toxicity before and after esterification against Artemia salina and larvicidal action on Aedes aegypti was investigated. Esters were produced using cinnamic acid as the acylating agent and citronella essential oil (3:1) in heptane and 15 wt% NS 88011 enzyme as biocatalysts, at 70 °C and 150 rpm. Conversion rates of citronellyl and geranyl cinnamates were 58.7 and 69.0% for NS 88011, respectively. For the toxicity to Artemia salina LC50 results of 5.29 μg mL-1 were obtained for the essential oil and 4.36 μg mL-1 for the esterified oils obtained with NS 88011. In the insecticidal activity against Aedes aegypti larvae, was obtained LC50 of 111.84 μg mL-1 for the essential oil of citronella and 86.30 μg mL-1 for the esterified oils obtained with the enzyme NS 88011, indicating high toxicity of the esters. The results demonstrated that the evaluated samples present potential of application as bioinsecticide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1519-6984.244647DOI Listing
July 2021
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