Publications by authors named "I Haukenes"

20 Publications

Chronic hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome are associated with risk of tendon injury.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopedic Surgery M, Copenhagen University Hospital - Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg and Center for Healthy Aging, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Tendon injury is a considerable problem affecting both physically active and sedentary people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between markers for metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome) and the risk of developing tendon injuries requiring referral to a hospital. The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective study of diabetic and non-diabetic individuals from the Danish general population with different physical activity levels. The cohort was followed for 3 years via national registers with respect to tendon injuries. Data from 5856 individuals (median age 62 years) were included. The overall incidence of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities that required an out-patient or in-house visit to a hospital was ~5.7/1000 person years. Individuals with elevated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) even in the prediabetic range (HbA1c>5.7%) had a ~3 times higher risk of tendon injury in the lower extremities only, as compared to individuals with normal HbA1C levels. Hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol>5 mmol/L) increased risk of tendon injury in the upper extremities by ~1.5 times, and individuals with metabolic syndrome had ~2.5 times higher risk of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time in a large cohort with different physical activity levels that the indicators for metabolic syndrome are a powerful systemic determinant of tendon injury, and two of its components, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, each independently make tendons susceptible for damage and injury.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13984DOI Listing
May 2021

The Female Menstrual Cycles Effect on Strength and Power Parameters in High-Level Female Team Athletes.

Front Physiol 2021 22;12:600668. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Purpose: The female menstrual cycle (MC) is characterized by hormonal fluctuations throughout its different phases. However, research regarding its effect on athletic performance in high level athletes is sparse. The aim of this study was to (i) investigate the female MCs effect on strength and power performance in highly trained female team athletes throughout the MC and (ii) examine whether eumenorrheic participants with natural hormonal fluctuations displayed enhanced performance in the follicular phase (FP) versus the luteal phase (LP), compared to controls using hormonal contraceptives.

Materials And Methods: A total of 29 athletes (Age 21.2 ± 3.3 years; weight 65.6 ± 8.7 kg; height 170.2 ± 8.0 cm; and fat free mass 52.7 ± 7.1) completed the study after a 6-week testing period (8 eumenorrheic participants and 21 hormonal contraceptive controls). Participants were recruited from the team sports soccer, handball and volleyball. Testing protocol consisted of maximal voluntary isometric grip strength, 20-m sprint, countermovement jump and pneumatic leg-press. Based on self-reported use of hormonal contraceptives, participants were divided into non-hormonal contraceptive group and hormonal contraceptive group, the latter working as a control group. Differences in performance between the FP and LP were investigated. MC phase was confirmed by serum hormonal levels through venous blood samples in the non-hormonal contraceptive group.

Results: There were no statistically significant changes for the two different phases of the MC, in terms of physical performance for the whole group. Further, there was no significant difference between groups during the MC for any of the outcome variables, maximal voluntary isometric grip strength (3.29) = 0.362; 20-m sprint (3.24) = 0.710; countermovement jump (3.26) = 2.361; and leg-press (3.26) = 1.746.

Conclusion: In high level female team athletes, no difference in performance was observed based on hormonal contraceptive status. This suggests that the MC does not alter acute strength and power performance on a group level in high level team athletes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2021.600668DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7937612PMC
February 2021

GPs' drug treatment for depression by patients' educational level: registry-based study.

BJGP Open 2021 Apr 26;5(2). Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Research Unit for General Practice, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bergen, Norway.

Background: Antidepressant drugs are often prescribed in general practice. Evidence is conflicting on how patient education influences antidepressant treatment.

Aim: To investigate the association between educational attainment and drug treatment in adult patients with a new depression diagnosis, and to what extent sex and age influence the association.

Design & Setting: A nationwide registry-based cohort study was undertaken in Norway from 2014-2016.

Method: The study comprised all residents of Norway born before 1996 and alive in 2015. Information was obtained on all new depression diagnoses in general practice in 2015 (primary care database) and data on all dispensed depression medication (Norwegian Prescription Database [NorPD]) 12 months after the date of diagnosis. Independent variables were education, sex, and age. Associations with drug treatment were estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model and performed separately for sex.

Results: Out of 49 967 patients with new depression (61.6% women), 15 678 were dispensed drugs (30.4% women, 33.0% men). Highly educated women were less likely to receive medication (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88 to 0.98) than women with low education. No such differences appeared among men. Women aged 20-29 years were more likely to be treated with drugs than those aged 30-59 years, and women aged ≥70 years were more likely to receive drugs (HR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.54 to 1.77) than those aged 20-29 years. The pattern was similar but less pronounced for men.

Conclusion: Educational differences in antidepressant therapy among women may reflect different treatment approaches that clinicians should be aware of to avoid unintended variation. Reasons for this variation and consequences for quality of treatment should be explored.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3399/BJGPO-2020-0122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8170601PMC
April 2021

General practitioners' drug treatment for depression by patients' educational level: registry-based study.

BJGP Open 2021 Apr 26;5(2). Epub 2021 Apr 26.

Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen Department of Medicine, Bergen, Norway.

Background: Antidepressant drugs are often prescribed in general practice. Evidence is conflicting on how patient education influences antidepressant treatment.

Aim: To investigate the association between educational attainment and drug treatment in adult patients with a new depression diagnosis, and how gender and age influence the association.

Design And Setting: Nationwide registry-based cohort study, Norway, 2014-2016.

Method: The study comprised all residents of Norway born before 1996 and alive in 2015. We obtained information on all new depression diagnoses in general practice in 2015 (Primary Care Database) and data on all dispensed depression medication (Norwegian Prescription Database) 12-months after the date of diagnosis. Independent variables were education, gender, and age. Associations with drug treatment were estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model, for genders separately.

Results: Out of 49,967 patients with new depression (61.6% women), 15,678 were dispensed drugs (30.4% women, 33.0% men). Highly educated women were less likely to receive medication (Hazard Ratio (HR) =0.93, 95% CI (0.88 - 0.98)) than women with low education. No such differences appeared among men. Women aged 20-29 were more likely to be treated with drugs than those aged 30-59, and women aged 70+ were more likely to receive drugs (HR=1.65, (1.54 - 1.77)) than those aged 20-29. The pattern was similar but less pronounced for men.

Conclusion: Educational differences in antidepressant therapy among women may reflect different treatment approaches that clinicians should be aware of to avoid unintended variation. Reasons for this variation and consequences for quality of treatment should be.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3399/BJGPO.2020.0122DOI Listing
April 2021

Variation in general practitioners' depression care following certification of sickness absence: a registry-based cohort study.

Fam Pract 2021 Jun;38(3):238-245

Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Background: Depression is more prevalent among women and people with low socio-economic status. Uncertainties exist about how general practitioner (GP) depression care varies with patients' social position.

Objective: To investigate associations between patients' gender and educational status combined and GP depression care following certification of sickness absence.

Methods: Nationwide registry-based cohort study, Norway, 2012-14. Reimbursement claims data from all consultations in general practice for depression were linked with information on socio-demographic data, social security benefits and depression medication. The study population comprised all individuals aged 25-66 years with taxable income, sick-listed with a new depression diagnosis in general practice in 2013 (n = 8857). We defined six intersectional groups by combining educational level and gender. The outcome was type of GP depression care during sick leave: follow-up consultation(s), talking therapy, medication and referral to secondary care. Associations between intersectional groups and outcome were estimated using generalized linear models.

Results: Among long-term absentees (17 days or more), highly educated women were less likely to receive medication compared to all other patient groups [relative risk (RR) ranging from 1.17 (95% confidence interval 1.03-1.33) to 1.49 (1.29-1.72)] and more likely to receive talking therapy than women with medium [RR = 0.90 (0.84-0.98)] or low [RR = 0.91 (0.85-0.98)] education.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that GPs provide equitable depression care regarding consultations and referrals for all intersectional groups but differential drug treatment and talking therapy for highly educated women. GPs need to be aware of these variations to provide personalized care and to prevent reproducing inequity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmaa120DOI Listing
June 2021