Publications by authors named "I Chirivella Gonzalez"

1,083 Publications

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Complete Genome Sequence of sp. Strain CA-256286.

Microbiol Resour Announc 2021 Jun 3;10(22):e0029021. Epub 2021 Jun 3.

The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.

Here, we report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of the genome of sp. strain CA-256286. The genome consists of a linear 7,726,360-nucleotide chromosome and a linear 466,817-nucleotide putative plasmid. This strain is predicted to produce a range of novel secondary metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00290-21DOI Listing
June 2021

Ethanol Enhances Hyperthermia-Induced Cell Death in Human Leukemia Cells.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 May 6;22(9). Epub 2021 May 6.

Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Fisiología, Genética e Inmunología, Instituto Universitario de Investigaciones Biomédicas y Sanitarias (IUIBS), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.

Ethanol has been shown to exhibit therapeutic properties as an ablative agent alone and in combination with thermal ablation. Ethanol may also increase sensitivity of cancer cells to certain physical and chemical antitumoral agents. The aim of our study was to assess the potential influence of nontoxic concentrations of ethanol on hyperthermia therapy, an antitumoral modality that is continuously growing and that can be combined with classical chemotherapy and radiotherapy to improve their efficiency. Human leukemia cells were included as a model in the study. The results indicated that ethanol augments the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia against U937 and HL60 cells. The therapeutic benefit of the hyperthermia/ethanol combination was associated with an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9. Apoptosis triggered either by hyperthermia or hyperthermia/ethanol was almost completely abolished by a caspase-8 specific inhibitor, indicating that this caspase plays a main role in both conditions. The role of caspase-9 in hyperthermia treated cells acquired significance whether ethanol was present during hyperthermia since the alcohol enhanced Bid cleavage, translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, release of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors, and decreased of the levels of the anti-apoptotic factor myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). The enhancement effect of ethanol on hyperthermia-activated cell death was associated with a reduction in the expression of HSP70, a protein known to interfere in the activation of apoptosis at different stages. Collectively, our findings suggest that ethanol could be useful as an adjuvant in hyperthermia therapy for cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22094948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8125413PMC
May 2021

Receptor for advanced glycation end-products axis and coronavirus disease 2019 in inflammatory bowel diseases: A dangerous liaison?

World J Gastroenterol 2021 May;27(19):2270-2280

Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago 8320000, Chile.

Compelling evidence supports the crucial role of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) axis activation in many clinical entities. Since the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, there is an increasing concern about the risk and handling of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, clinical data raised during pandemic suggests that IBD patients do not have an increased risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2 infection or develop a more severe course of infection. In the present review, we intend to highlight how two potentially important contributors to the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection in IBD patients, the RAGE axis activation as well as the cross-talk with the renin-angiotensin system, are dampened by the high expression of soluble forms of both RAGE and the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2. The soluble form of RAGE functions as a decoy for its ligands, and soluble ACE2 seems to be an additionally attenuating contributor to RAGE axis activation, particularly by avoiding the transactivation of the RAGE axis that can be produced by the virus-mediated imbalance of the ACE/angiotensin II/angiotensin II receptor type 1 pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v27.i19.2270DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8130044PMC
May 2021

Describing universal Strongyloides serologic screening among pediatric intestinal and liver transplant recipients.

Pediatr Transplant 2021 May 18:e14039. Epub 2021 May 18.

Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami Transplant Institute/Jackson Health System, Miami, FL, USA.

Background: Strongyloides spp hyperinfections are a worldwide phenomenon that proves fatal for solid organ transplant recipients. Screening protocols to guide prophylaxis management vary institution to institution from universal to epidemiology driven. Our institution initiated a universal screening protocol regardless of travel history and exposure to ensure no cases were missed.

Methods: In this study, we describe the outcomes of three Strongyloides sero-positive children whom underwent intestinal or liver transplantation and the experience of universal screening at a tertiary care county hospital in South Florida.

Results: Among the 66 intestine and liver pediatric transplant recipients who were screened for Strongyloides antibodies, only three were identified to be sero-positive via the screening mechanism. Two of three had significant epidemiology risk factors. None of the patients reviewed were found to have developed hyperinfection. However, reflecting on the experience represented by our series of pediatric patients, the risk of any complication related to Strongyloides status appears low. Even among this South Florida population whom come from or travel to endemic regions are in contact with sero-positive individuals, very few illustrate sero-positivity.

Conclusion: While institutions continue to analyze the cost-benefit of universal testing vs. universal prophylaxis vs. targeted screening, the decision must encompass the patient population, rolling cumulative incidence, and morbidity and mortality related to this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/petr.14039DOI Listing
May 2021

Genome-wide bioinformatic analyses predict key host and viral factors in SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis.

Commun Biol 2021 05 17;4(1):590. Epub 2021 May 17.

Department of Computer Science, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA.

The novel betacoronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a worldwide pandemic (COVID-19) after emerging in Wuhan, China. Here we analyzed public host and viral RNA sequencing data to better understand how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with human respiratory cells. We identified genes, isoforms and transposable element families that are specifically altered in SARS-CoV-2-infected respiratory cells. Well-known immunoregulatory genes including CSF2, IL32, IL-6 and SERPINA3 were differentially expressed, while immunoregulatory transposable element families were upregulated. We predicted conserved interactions between the SARS-CoV-2 genome and human RNA-binding proteins such as the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4 (eIF4b). We also identified a viral sequence variant with a statistically significant skew associated with age of infection, that may contribute to intracellular host-pathogen interactions. These findings can help identify host mechanisms that can be targeted by prophylactics and/or therapeutics to reduce the severity of COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-02095-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8128904PMC
May 2021