Publications by authors named "Iñaki Odriozola"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Microbial activity in alpine soils under climate change.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Aug 10;783:147012. Epub 2021 Apr 10.

Department of Ecological and Biological Sciences, University of Tuscia, Largo dell'Università, 01100 Viterbo, Italy. Electronic address:

Soil enzymatic activity was assessed in the Stelvio Pass area (Italian Central Alps) aiming to define the possible effects of climate change on microbial functioning. Two sites at two different elevations were chosen, a subalpine (2239 m) and an alpine belt (2604-2624 m), with mean annual air temperature differing by almost 3 °C, coherent with the worst future warming scenario (RCP 8.5) by 2100. The lower altitude site may represent a proxy of the potential future situation at higher altitude after the upward shift of subalpine vegetation due to climate change. Additionally, hexagonal open top chambers (OTCs) were installed at the upper site, to passively increase by about 2 °C the summer inner temperature to simulate short term effects of warming before the vegetation shift takes place. Soil physicochemical properties and the bacterial and fungal abundances of the above samples were also considered. The subalpine soils showed a higher microbial activity, especially for hydrolytic enzymes, higher carbon, ammonium and hydrogen (p < 0.001) contents, and a slightly higher PO content (p < 0.05) than alpine soils. Bacterial abundance was higher than fungal abundance, both for alpine and subalpine soils. On the other hand, the short term effect, which increased the mean soil temperature during the peak of the growing season in the OTC, showed to induce scarcely significant differences for edaphic parameters and microbial biomass content among the warmed and control plots. Using the manipulative warming experiments, we demonstrated that warming is able to change the enzyme activity starting from colder and higher altitude sites, known to be more vulnerable to the rising temperatures associated with climate change. Although five-years of experimental warming does not allow us to make bold conclusions, it appeared that warming-induced upwards vegetation shift might induce more substantial changes in enzymatic activities than the short-term effects, in the present vegetation context.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.147012DOI Listing
August 2021

Explorative Meta-Analysis of 417 Extant Archaeal Genomes to Predict Their Contribution to the Total Microbiome Functionality.

Microorganisms 2021 Feb 13;9(2). Epub 2021 Feb 13.

Molecular Systems Biology, Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research, UFZ, 04318 Leipzig, Germany.

Revealing the relationship between taxonomy and function in microbiomes is critical to discover their contribution to ecosystem functioning. However, while the relationship between taxonomic and functional diversity in bacteria and fungi is known, this is not the case for archaea. Here, we used a meta-analysis of 417 completely annotated extant and taxonomically unique archaeal genomes to predict the extent of microbiome functionality on Earth contained within archaeal genomes using accumulation curves of all known level 3 functions of KEGG Orthology. We found that intergenome redundancy as functions present in multiple genomes was inversely related to intragenome redundancy as multiple copies of a gene in one genome, implying the tradeoff between additional copies of functionally important genes or a higher number of different genes. A logarithmic model described the relationship between functional diversity and species richness better than both the unsaturated and the saturated model, which suggests a limited total number of archaeal functions in contrast to the sheer unlimited potential of bacteria and fungi. Using the global archaeal species richness estimate of 13,159, the logarithmic model predicted 4164.1 ± 2.9 KEGG level 3 functions. The non-parametric bootstrap estimate yielded a lower bound of 2994 ± 57 KEGG level 3 functions. Our approach not only highlighted similarities in functional redundancy but also the difference in functional potential of archaea compared to other domains of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020381DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7918521PMC
February 2021

Fungal Communities Are Important Determinants of Bacterial Community Composition in Deadwood.

mSystems 2021 Jan 5;6(1). Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic.

Fungal-bacterial interactions play a key role in the functioning of many ecosystems. Thus, understanding their interactive dynamics is of central importance for gaining predictive knowledge on ecosystem functioning. However, it is challenging to disentangle the mechanisms behind species associations from observed co-occurrence patterns, and little is known about the directionality of such interactions. Here, we applied joint species distribution modeling to high-throughput sequencing data on co-occurring fungal and bacterial communities in deadwood to ask whether fungal and bacterial co-occurrences result from shared habitat use (i.e., deadwood's properties) or whether there are fungal-bacterial interactive associations after habitat characteristics are taken into account. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that the interactions are mainly modulated through fungal communities influencing bacterial communities. For that, we quantified how much the predictive power of the joint species distribution models for bacterial and fungal community improved when accounting for the other community. Our results show that fungi and bacteria form tight association networks (i.e., some species pairs co-occur more frequently and other species pairs co-occur less frequently than expected by chance) in deadwood that include common (or opposite) responses to the environment as well as (potentially) biotic interactions. Additionally, we show that information about the fungal occurrences and abundances increased the power to predict the bacterial abundances substantially, whereas information about the bacterial occurrences and abundances increased the power to predict the fungal abundances much less. Our results suggest that fungal communities may mainly affect bacteria in deadwood. Understanding the interactive dynamics between fungal and bacterial communities is important to gain predictive knowledge on ecosystem functioning. However, little is known about the mechanisms behind fungal-bacterial associations and the directionality of species interactions. Applying joint species distribution modeling to high-throughput sequencing data on co-occurring fungal-bacterial communities in deadwood, we found evidence that nonrandom fungal-bacterial associations derive from shared habitat use as well as (potentially) biotic interactions. Importantly, the combination of cross-validations and conditional cross-validations helped us to answer the question about the directionality of the biotic interactions, providing evidence that suggests that fungal communities may mainly affect bacteria in deadwood. Our modeling approach may help gain insight into the directionality of interactions between different components of the microbiome in other environments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mSystems.01017-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7786133PMC
January 2021

Termites Are Associated with External Species-Specific Bacterial Communities.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2021 01 4;87(2). Epub 2021 Jan 4.

Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic

All termites have established a wide range of associations with symbiotic microbes in their guts. Some termite species are also associated with microbes that grow in their nests, but the prevalence of these associations remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the bacterial communities associated with the termites and galleries of three wood-feeding termite species by using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We found that the compositions of bacterial communities among termite bodies, termite galleries, and control wood fragments devoid of termite activities differ in a species-specific manner. Termite galleries were enriched in bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to and , which were often shared by several termite species. The abundance of several bacterial OTUs, such as , , , and , was reduced in termite galleries. Our results demonstrate that both termite guts and termite galleries harbor unique bacterial communities. As is the case for all ecosystem engineers, termites impact their habitat by their activities, potentially affecting bacterial communities. Here, we studied three wood-feeding termite species and found that they influence the composition of the bacterial communities in their surrounding environment. Termite activities have positive effects on and abundance and negative effects on the abundance of several ubiquitous genera, such as , , , and Our results demonstrate that termite galleries harbor unique bacterial communities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02042-20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7783351PMC
January 2021

GlobalFungi, a global database of fungal occurrences from high-throughput-sequencing metabarcoding studies.

Sci Data 2020 07 13;7(1):228. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi are key players in vital ecosystem services, spanning carbon cycling, decomposition, symbiotic associations with cultivated and wild plants and pathogenicity. The high importance of fungi in ecosystem processes contrasts with the incompleteness of our understanding of the patterns of fungal biogeography and the environmental factors that drive those patterns. To reduce this gap of knowledge, we collected and validated data published on the composition of soil fungal communities in terrestrial environments including soil and plant-associated habitats and made them publicly accessible through a user interface at https://globalfungi.com . The GlobalFungi database contains over 600 million observations of fungal sequences across > 17 000 samples with geographical locations and additional metadata contained in 178 original studies with millions of unique nucleotide sequences (sequence variants) of the fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 representing fungal species and genera. The study represents the most comprehensive atlas of global fungal distribution, and it is framed in such a way that third-party data addition is possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0567-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359306PMC
July 2020

Environmentally relevant concentrations of silver nanoparticles diminish soil microbial biomass but do not alter enzyme activities or microbial diversity.

J Hazard Mater 2020 06 4;391:122224. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

CEBAS-CSIC. Department of Soil and Water Conservation, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain.

The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) due to their well-known antimicrobial activity, has led to their accumulation in soil ecosystems. However, the impact of environmental realistic concentrations of AgNPs on the soil microbial community has been scarcely studied. In this work, we have assessed the impact of AgNPs, that mimic real concentrations in nature, on tropical soils cultivated with Coffea arabica under conventional and organic management systems. We evaluated the biomass, extracellular enzyme activities, and diversity of the soil microbial community, in a microcosm experiment as a function of time. After seven days of incubation, we found an increase in microbial biomass in an AgNPs-concentration-independent manner. In contrast, after 60-day-incubation, there was a decrease in Gram+ and actinobacterial biomass, in both soils and all AgNPs concentrations. Soil physico-chemical properties and enzyme activities were not affected overall by AgNPs. Regarding the microbial community composition, only some differences in the relative abundance at phylum and genus level in the fungal community were observed. Our results suggest that environmental concentrations of AgNPs affected microbial biomass but had little impact on microbial diversity and may have little effects on the soil biogeochemical cycles mediated by extracellular enzyme activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.122224DOI Listing
June 2020

A meta-analysis of global fungal distribution reveals climate-driven patterns.

Nat Commun 2019 11 13;10(1):5142. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

The evolutionary and environmental factors that shape fungal biogeography are incompletely understood. Here, we assemble a large dataset consisting of previously generated mycobiome data linked to specific geographical locations across the world. We use this dataset to describe the distribution of fungal taxa and to look for correlations with different environmental factors such as climate, soil and vegetation variables. Our meta-study identifies climate as an important driver of different aspects of fungal biogeography, including the global distribution of common fungi as well as the composition and diversity of fungal communities. In our analysis, fungal diversity is concentrated at high latitudes, in contrast with the opposite pattern previously shown for plants and other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi appear to have narrower climatic tolerances than pathogenic fungi. We speculate that climate change could affect ecosystem functioning because of the narrow climatic tolerances of key fungal taxa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13164-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853883PMC
November 2019