Publications by authors named "Hyo Hyun Seo"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Gene expression profile of human follicle dermal papilla cells in response to Camellia japonica phytoplacenta extract.

FEBS Open Bio 2021 03 14;11(3):633-651. Epub 2021 Feb 14.

Anti-aging Research Institute of BIO-FD&C Co., Ltd., Incheon, Korea.

Camellia japonica L. is a flowering tree with several medicinal and cosmetic applications. Here, we investigated the efficacy of C. japonica placenta extract (CJPE) as a potential therapeutic agent for promotion of hair growth and scalp health by using various in vitro and in vivo assays. Moreover, we performed transcriptome analysis to examine the relative expression of human follicle dermal papilla cells (HFDPC) in response to CJPE by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). In vitro assays revealed upregulation of the expression of hair growth marker genes in HFDPC after CJPE treatment. Moreover, in vivo clinical tests with 42 adult female participants showed that a solution containing 0.5% CJPE increased the moisture content of the scalp and decreased the scalp's sebum content, dead scalp keratin, and erythema. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis revealed key genes in HFDPC which are associated with CJPE. Interestingly, genes associated with lipid metabolism and cholesterol efflux were upregulated. Genes upregulated by CJPE are associated with several hormones, including parathyroid, adrenocorticotropic hormone, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), and norepinephrine, which are involved in hair follicle biology. Furthermore, some upregulated genes are associated with the regulation of axon guidance. In contrast, many genes downregulated by CJPE are associated with structural components of the cytoskeleton. In addition, CJPE suppressed genes associated with muscle structure and development. Taken together, this study provides extensive evidence that CJPE may have potential as a therapeutic agent for scalp treatment and hair growth promotion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2211-5463.13076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7931240PMC
March 2021

Synthesis of Kisspeptin-Mimicking Fragments and Investigation of their Skin Anti-Aging Effects.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Nov 10;21(22). Epub 2020 Nov 10.

COSMAX BTI R&I Center, Material Lab, Pangyo Inno Valley E 255, Pangyo-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13486, Korea.

In recent years, a number of active materials have been developed to provide anti-aging benefits for skin and, among them, peptides have been considered the most promising candidate due to their remarkable and long-lasting anti-wrinkle activity. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the relationship between the secretion of emotion-related hormones and skin aging. Kisspeptin, a neuropeptide encoded by the gene, has gained attention in reproductive endocrinology since it stimulates the reproductive axis in the hypothalamus; however, the effects of Kisspeptin on skin have not been studied yet. In this study, we synthesized Kisspeptin-10 and Kisspeptin-E, which are biologically active fragments, to mimic the action of Kisspeptin. Next, we demonstrated the anti-aging effects of the Kisspeptin-mimicking fragments using UV-induced skin aging models, such as UV-induced human dermal fibroblasts (Hs68) and human skin explants. Kisspeptin-E suppressed UV-induced 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) stimulation leading to a regulation of skin aging related genes, including type I procollagen, matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-8, and rescued the skin integrity. Taken together, these results suggest that Kisspeptin-E could be useful to improve UV-induced skin aging by modulating expression of stress related genes, such as 11β-HSD1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7698007PMC
November 2020

Acceleration of somatic cell reprogramming into the induced pluripotent stem cell using a mycosporine-like amino acid, Porphyra 334.

Sci Rep 2020 02 28;10(1):3684. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Anti-aging Research Institute, BIO-FD&C Co., Ltd, Inchon, 21990, Korea.

Porphyra 334 (P334), a mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA), is a secondary metabolite found in diverse marine and terrestrial organisms and has several beneficial effects on fibroblast proliferation, wound healing, and antioxidant activity. Here, we report that P334 accelerates the cell reprogramming process of mouse tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs) and human dermal papilla (HDP) cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We found that P334 significantly improved the cell reprogramming efficiency by activating the tri-methylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3), which controls mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) during the reprogramming process. Thus, we found that P334 directly regulates epigenetic changes, providing an efficient approach for natural compound-based cell reprogramming.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-60680-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7048830PMC
February 2020

Anti-Aging Effects of (Edelweiss) Callus Culture Extract Through Transcriptome Profiling.

Genes (Basel) 2020 02 21;11(2). Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Anti-Aging Research Institute of BIO-FD&C Co., Ltd., Incheon 21990, Korea.

Edelweiss () in the family is a wildflower that grows in rocky limestone places. Here, we investigated the efficacy of edelweiss callus culture extract ( callus culture extract; LACCE) using multiple assays from to as well as transcriptome profiling. Several assay results showed the strong antioxidant activity of LACCE in response to UVB treatment. Moreover, LACCE suppressed inflammation and wrinkling; however, moisturizing activity was increased by LACCE. The clinical test demonstrated that constant application of LACCE on the face and skin tissues improved anti-periorbital wrinkles, skin elasticity, dermal density, and skin thickness compared with the placebo. The RNA-Sequencing results showed at least 16.56% of human genes were expressed in keratinocyte cells. LACCE up-regulated genes encoding several KRT proteins; DDIT4, BNIP3, and IGFBP3 were involved in the positive regulation of the developmental process, programmed cell death, keratinization, and cornification forming skin barriers, which provide many advantages in the human skin. By contrast, down-regulated genes were stress-responsive genes, including metal, oxidation, wounding, hypoxia, and virus infection, suggesting LACCE did not cause any harmful stress on the skin. Our comprehensive study demonstrated LACCE is a promising agent for anti-aging cosmetics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11020230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7074254PMC
February 2020

Anti-inflammation activities of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in response to UV radiation suggest potential anti-skin aging activity.

Mar Drugs 2014 Oct 14;12(10):5174-87. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

South Sea Environment Research Department, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Geoje 656-830, Korea.

Certain photosynthetic marine organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract UV-radiation by synthesizing UV-absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). In this study, MAAs were separated from the extracts of marine green alga Chlamydomonas hedleyi using HPLC and were identified as porphyra-334, shinorine, and mycosporine-glycine (mycosporine-Gly), based on their retention times and maximum absorption wavelengths. Furthermore, their structures were confirmed by triple quadrupole MS/MS. Their roles as UV-absorbing compounds were investigated in the human fibroblast cell line HaCaT by analyzing the expression levels of genes associated with antioxidant activity, inflammation, and skin aging in response to UV irradiation. The mycosporine-Gly extract, but not the other MAAs, had strong antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Furthermore, treatment with mycosporine-Gly resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels, which are typically increased in response to inflammation in the skin, in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, in the presence of MAAs, the UV-suppressed genes, procollagen C proteinase enhancer (PCOLCE) and elastin, which are related to skin aging, had increased expression levels equal to those in UV-mock treated cells. Interestingly, the increased expression of involucrin after UV exposure was suppressed by treatment with the MAAs mycosporine-Gly and shinorine, but not porphyra-334. This is the first report investigating the biological activities of microalgae-derived MAAs in human cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md12105174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210892PMC
October 2014

Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinase AtCPK32 interacts with ABF4, a transcriptional regulator of abscisic acid-responsive gene expression, and modulates its activity.

Plant Physiol 2005 Dec 18;139(4):1750-61. Epub 2005 Nov 18.

Kumho Life and Environmental Science Laboratory, Gwangju 500-712, South Korea.

The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates stress-responsive gene expression during vegetative growth. The ABA regulation of many genes is mediated by a subfamily of basic leucine zipper class transcription factors referred to as ABFs (i.e. ABF1-ABF4), whose transcriptional activity is induced by ABA. Here we show that a calcium-dependent protein kinase is involved in the ABA-dependent activation process. We carried out yeast two-hybrid screens to identify regulatory components of ABF4 function and isolated AtCPK32 as an ABF4-interacting protein. AtCPK32 has autophosphorylation activity and can phosphorylate ABF4 in vitro. Mutational analysis indicated that serine-110 of ABF4, which is highly conserved among ABF family members, may be phosphorylated by AtCPK32. The serine-110 residue is essential for ABF4-AtCPK32 interaction, and transient expression assay revealed that it is also required for the normal transcriptional function of ABF4. The expression patterns and subcellular localization of AtCPK32 are similar to those of ABF4. Furthermore, its overexpression affects both ABA sensitivity and the expression of a number of ABF4-regulated genes. Together, our data demonstrate that AtCPK32 is an ABA signaling component that regulates the ABA-responsive gene expression via ABF4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.105.069757DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1310556PMC
December 2005
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