Publications by authors named "Hye Yun Moon"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Molecular characterization of Hsf1 as a master regulator of heat shock response in the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Ogataea parapolymorpha.

J Microbiol 2021 Feb 1;59(2):151-163. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, Republic of Korea.

Ogataea parapolymorpha (Hansenula polymorpha DL-1) is a thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast with biotechnological applications. Here, O. parapolymorpha genes whose expression is induced in response to heat shock were identified by transcriptome analysis and shown to possess heat shock elements (HSEs) in their promoters. The function of O. parapolymorpha HSF1 encoding a putative heat shock transcription factor 1 (OpHsf1) was characterized in the context of heat stress response. Despite exhibiting low sequence identity (26%) to its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, OpHsf1 harbors conserved domains including a DNA binding domain (DBD), domains involved in trimerization (TRI), transcriptional activation (AR1, AR2), transcriptional repression (CE2), and a C-terminal modulator (CTM) domain. OpHSF1 could complement the temperature sensitive (Ts) phenotype of a S. cerevisiae hsf1 mutant. An O. parapolymorpha strain with an H221R mutation in the DBD domain of OpHsf1 exhibited significantly retarded growth and a Ts phenotype. Intriguingly, the expression of heat-shock-protein-coding genes harboring HSEs was significantly decreased in the H221R mutant strain, even under non-stress conditions, indicating the importance of the DBD for the basal growth of O. parapolymorpha. Notably, even though the deletion of C-terminal domains (ΔCE2, ΔAR2, ΔCTM) of OpHsf1 destroyed complementation of the growth defect of the S. cerevisiae hsf1 strain, the C-terminal domains were shown to be dispensable in O. parapolymorpha. Overexpression of OpHsf1 in S. cerevisiae increased resistance to transient heat shock, supporting the idea that OpHsf1 could be useful in the development of heat-shock-resistant yeast host strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-021-0646-2DOI Listing
February 2021

Yeast synthetic biology for designed cell factories producing secretory recombinant proteins.

FEMS Yeast Res 2020 03;20(2)

Laboratory of Molecular Systems Biology, Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, South Korea.

Yeasts are prominent hosts for the production of recombinant proteins from industrial enzymes to therapeutic proteins. Particularly, the similarity of protein secretion pathways between these unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms and higher eukaryotic organisms has made them a preferential host to produce secretory recombinant proteins. However, there are several bottlenecks, in terms of quality and quantity, restricting their use as secretory recombinant protein production hosts. In this mini-review, we discuss recent developments in synthetic biology approaches to constructing yeast cell factories endowed with enhanced capacities of protein folding and secretion as well as designed targeted post-translational modification process functions. We focus on the new genetic tools for optimizing secretory protein expression, such as codon-optimized synthetic genes, combinatory synthetic signal peptides and copy number-controllable integration systems, and the advanced cellular engineering strategies, including endoplasmic reticulum and protein trafficking pathway engineering, synthetic glycosylation, and cell wall engineering, for improving the quality and yield of secretory recombinant proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsyr/foaa009DOI Listing
March 2020

Screening and Selection of Production Strains: Secretory Protein Expression and Analysis in Hansenula polymorpha.

Methods Mol Biol 2019 ;1923:133-151

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

The thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been used as a host for the high-level production of recombinant proteins from industrial enzymes to therapeutic proteins. Despite favorable characteristics of the H. polymorpha-based platform for application to heterologous gene expression, several problems and limitations, such as over-glycosylation and proteolytic degradation, can be encountered in the development of production strains for secretory proteins. Here, H. polymorpha genetic tools and host strains, developed for authentic processing and modification of secretory recombinant proteins, are introduced with the analytical protocols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-9024-5_5DOI Listing
June 2019

Development of conditional cell lysis mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as production hosts by modulating OCH1 and CHS3 expression.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2019 Mar 31;103(5):2277-2293. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, South Korea.

The traditional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used as a host for the production of recombinant proteins and metabolites with industrial potential. However, its thick and rigid cell wall presents problems for the effective recovery of products. In this study, we modulated the expression of ScOCH1, encoding the α-1,6-mannosyltransferase responsible for outer chain biosynthesis of N-glycans, and ScCHS3, encoding the chitin synthase III required for synthesis of the majority of cell wall chitin, by exploiting the repressible ScMET3 promoter. The conditional single mutants P-OCH1 and P-CHS3 and the double mutant P-OCH1/P-CHS3 showed comparable growth to the wild-type strain under normal conditions but exhibited increased sensitivity to temperature and cell wall-disturbing agents in the presence of methionine. Such conditional growth defects were fully recovered by supplementation with 1 M sorbitol. The osmotic lysis of the conditional mutants cultivated with methionine was sufficient to release the intracellularly expressed recombinant protein, nodavirus capsid protein, with up to 60% efficiency, compared to lysis by glass bead breakage. These mutant strains also showed approximately three-fold-enhanced secretion of a recombinant extracellular glycoprotein, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera β-glucosidase, with markedly reduced hypermannosylation, particularly in the P-OCH1 mutants. Furthermore, a substantial increase of extracellular glutathione production, up to four-fold, was achieved with the conditional mutant yeast cells. Together, our data support that the conditional cell wall lysis mutants constructed based on the modulation of ScOCH1 and ScCHS3 expression would likely be useful hosts for the improved recovery of proteins and metabolites with industrial application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-019-09614-4DOI Listing
March 2019

Molecular and functional characterization of two pyruvate decarboxylase genes, PDC1 and PDC5, in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2018 Apr 1;102(8):3723-3737. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 156-756, Republic of Korea.

Pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) is a cytosolic enzyme located at the branch point between fermentative and respiratory sugar catabolism. Here, we identified and functionally characterized KmPDC1 and KmPDC5 encoding two homologs of Pdc in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus KCTC 17555. Despite the conservation of important Pdc domains, a few amino acid sequences essential for enzymatic activity are not conserved in KmPdc5p. Deletion of KmPDC1 alone eliminated most of Pdc activity, but the growth of the Kmpdc1Δ strain on glucose was comparable to that of the wild type (WT) strain under aerobic conditions. In contrast to the WT, Kmpdc1Δ could not grow on glucose under oxygen-limited conditions. The KmPDC5 deletion did not generate any apparent change in Pdc activity or growth patterns under several tested conditions. Whereas the expression of KmPDC1 was enhanced by glucose, the basic expression levels of KmPDC5 were very low, without a detectable difference between glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources. Moreover, KmPDC5 overexpression was unable to complement the growth defect of Kmpdc1Δ in the presence of antimycin A, and the purified recombinant KmPdc5p was inactive in Pdc activity assay, supporting the notion that KmPdc5p may lack Pdc enzymatic activity. Notably, compared to the WT, Kmpdc1Δ single and Kmpdc1Δpdc5Δ double mutants produced significantly less glycerol, acetate, and ethanol while accumulating pyruvate. Altogether, our data indicate that a single deletion of KmPDC1 is sufficient in Crabtree-negative K. marxianus strains to generate a starting host strain for engineering of production of high-value biomaterials derived from pyruvate without byproduct formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-018-8862-3DOI Listing
April 2018

Development of recombinant Yarrowia lipolytica producing virus-like particles of a fish nervous necrosis virus.

J Microbiol 2017 Aug 28;55(8):655-664. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 06974, Republic of Korea.

Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) causes viral encephalopathy and retinopathy, a devastating disease of many species of cultured marine fish worldwide. In this study, we used the dimorphic non-pathogenic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica as a host to express the capsid protein of red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV-CP) and evaluated its potential as a platform for vaccine production. An initial attempt was made to express the codon-optimized synthetic genes encoding intact and N-terminal truncated forms of RGNNV-CP under the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter using autonomously replicating sequence (ARS)-based vectors. The full-length recombinant capsid proteins expressed in Y. lipolytica were detected not only as monomers and but also as trimers, which is a basic unit for formation of NNV virus-like particles (VLPs). Oral immunization of mice with whole recombinant Y. lipolytica harboring the ARS-based plasmids was shown to efficiently induce the formation of IgG against RGNNV-CP. To increase the number of integrated copies of the RGNNV-CP expression cassette, a set of 26S ribosomal DNA-based multiple integrative vectors was constructed in combination with a series of defective Ylura3 with truncated promoters as selection markers, resulting in integrants harboring up to eight copies of the RGNNV-CP cassette. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and transmission electron microscopy of this high-copy integrant were carried out to confirm the expression of RGNNV-CPs as VLPs. This is the first report on efficient expression of viral capsid proteins as VLPs in Y. lipolytica, demonstrating high potential for the Y. lipolytica expression system as a platform for recombinant vaccine production based on VLPs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-017-7218-5DOI Listing
August 2017

Functional analysis of recombinant human and Yarrowia lipolytica O-GlcNAc transferases expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

J Microbiol 2016 Oct 30;54(10):667-74. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Seoul, 06974, Republic of Korea.

O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) glycosylation is an important post-translational modification in many cellular processes. It is mediated by O-GlcNAc transferases (OGTs), which catalyze the addition of O-GlcNAc to serine or threonine residues of the target proteins. In this study, we expressed a putative Yarrowia lipolytica OGT (YlOGT), the only homolog identified in the subphylum Saccharomycotina through bioinformatics analysis, and the human OGT (hOGT) as recombinant proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and performed their functional characterization. Immunoblotting assays using antibody against O-GlcNAc revealed that recombinant hOGT (rhOGT), but not the recombinant YlOGT (rYlOGT), undergoes auto-O-GlcNAcylation in the heterologous host S. cerevisiae. Moreover, the rhOGT expressed in S. cerevisiae showed a catalytic activity during in vitro assays using casein kinase II substrates, whereas no such activity was obtained in rYlOGT. However, the chimeric human-Y. lipolytica OGT, carrying the human tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain along with the Y. lipolytica catalytic domain (CTD), mediated the transfer of O-GlcNAc moiety during the in vitro assays. Although the overexpression of full-length OGTs inhibited the growth of S. cerevisiae, no such inhibition was obtained upon overexpression of only the CTD fragment, indicating the role of TPR domain in growth inhibition. This is the first report on the functional analysis of the fungal OGT, indicating that the Y. lipolytica OGT retains its catalytic activity, although the physiological role and substrates of YlOGT remain to be elucidated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-016-6401-4DOI Listing
October 2016

A new set of rDNA-NTS-based multiple integrative cassettes for the development of antibiotic-marker-free recombinant yeasts.

J Biotechnol 2016 Sep 10;233:190-9. Epub 2016 Jul 10.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, South Korea; Bio-Integration Research Center for Nutra-Pharmaceutical Epigenetics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, South Korea. Electronic address:

The traditional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used as a host system to produce recombinant proteins and metabolites of great commercial value. To engineer recombinant yeast that stably maintains expression cassettes without an antibiotic resistance gene, we developed new multiple integration cassettes by exploiting the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in combination with defective selection markers. The 5' and 3'-fragments of rDNA-NTS2 were used as flanking sequences for the expression cassettes carrying a set of URA3, LEU2, HIS3, and TRP1 selection markers with truncated promoters of different lengths. The integration numbers of NTS-based expression cassettes, ranging from one to ∼30 copies, showed a proportional increase with the extent of decreased expression of the auxotrophic markers. The NTS-based cassettes were used to construct yeast strains expressing the capsid protein of red-spotted grouper necrosis virus (RG-NNVCP) in a copy number-dependent manner. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast, harboring ∼30 copies of the integrated RG-NNVCP cassettes, provoked efficient immune responses in mice. In contrast, for the NTS cassettes expressing a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, the integrant carrying only 4 copies was screened as the highest producer of squalene, showing a 150-fold increase compared to that of the wild-type strain. The multiple integrated cassettes were stably retained under prolonged nonselective conditions. Altogether, our results strongly support that rDNA-NTS integrative cassettes are useful tools to construct recombinant yeasts carrying optimal copies of a desired expression cassette without an antibiotic marker gene, which are suitable as oral vaccines or feed additives for animal and human consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2016.07.006DOI Listing
September 2016

Hansenula polymorpha Hac1p Is Critical to Protein N-Glycosylation Activity Modulation, as Revealed by Functional and Transcriptomic Analyses.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2015 Oct 31;81(20):6982-93. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Aggregation of misfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) induces a cellular protective response to ER stress, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, Hac1p/Xbp1. In this study, we identified and studied the molecular functions of a HAC1 homolog from the thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha (HpHAC1). We found that the HpHAC1 mRNA contains a nonconventional intron of 177 bp whose interaction with the 5' untranslated region is responsible for the translational inhibition of the HpHAC1 mRNA. The H. polymorpha hac1-null (Hphac1Δ) mutant strain grew slowly, even under normal growth conditions, and was less thermotolerant than the wild-type (WT) strain. The mutant strain was also more sensitive to cell wall-perturbing agents and to the UPR-inducing agents dithiothreitol (DTT) and tunicamycin (TM). Using comparative transcriptome analysis of the WT and Hphac1Δ strains treated with DTT and TM, we identified HpHAC1-dependent core UPR targets, which included genes involved in protein secretion and processing, particularly those required for N-linked protein glycosylation. Notably, different glycosylation and processing patterns of the vacuolar glycoprotein carboxypeptidase Y were observed in the WT and Hphac1Δ strains. Moreover, overexpression of active HpHac1p significantly increased the N-linked glycosylation efficiency and TM resistance. Collectively, our results suggest that the function of HpHac1p is important not only for UPR induction but also for efficient glycosylation in H. polymorpha.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01440-15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579441PMC
October 2015

Cell-surface expression of Aspergillus saitoi-derived functional α-1,2-mannosidase on Yarrowia lipolytica for glycan remodeling.

J Microbiol 2013 Aug 30;51(4):506-14. Epub 2013 Aug 30.

Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

Expression of proteins on the surface of yeast has a wide range of applications, such as development of live vaccines, screening of antibody libraries, and use as whole-cell biocatalysts. The hemiascomycetes yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has been raised as a potential host for heterologous expression of recombinant proteins. In this study, we report the expression of Aspergillus saitoi α-1,2-mannosidase, encoded by the msdS gene, on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. As the first step to achieve the secretory expression of msdS protein, four different signal sequences-derived from the endogenous Y. lipolytica Lip2 and Xpr2 prepro regions and the heterologous A. niger α-amylase and rice α-amylase signal sequences-were analyzed for their secretion efficiency. It was shown that the YlLip2 prepro sequence was most efficient in directing the secretory expression of msdS in fully N-glycosylated forms. The surface display of msdS was subsequently directed by fusing GPI anchoring motifs derived from Y. lipolytica cell wall proteins, YlCwp1p and YlYwp1p, respectively, to the C-terminus of the Lip2 prepro-msdS protein. The expression of actively functional msdS protein on the cell surface was confirmed by western blot, flow cytometry analysis, along with the α-1,2-mannosidase activity assay using intact Y. lipolytica cells as the enzyme source. Furthermore, the glycoengineered Y. lipolytica Δoch1Δmpo1 strains displaying α-1,2-mannosidase were able to convert Man8GlcNAc2 to Man5GlcNAc2 efficiently on their cell-wall mannoproteins, demonstrating its potential used for glycoengineering in vitro or in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12275-013-3344-xDOI Listing
August 2013

Functional and molecular characterization of novel Hansenula polymorpha genes, HpPMT5 and HpPMT6, encoding protein O-mannosyltransferases.

Fungal Genet Biol 2013 Sep-Oct;58-59:10-24. Epub 2013 Aug 11.

Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, Republic of Korea.

The genome of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha reveals the presence of five PMT homologues (HpPMT1, HpPMT2, HpPMT4, HpPMT5, and HpPMT6) encoding protein O-mannosyltransferases. Here, we report on the systematic characterization of HpPMT5 and HpPMT6, encoding novel PMT1 and PMT2 subfamily members, respectively. Although no apparent growth defects were detected in the Hppmt5Δ and Hppmt6Δ single mutants, the single mutants showed dramatic sensitivity to the Pmt1p inhibitor, and the Hppmt1pmt5Δ and Hppmt1pmt6Δ double mutants displayed increased susceptibility to cell wall-disturbing reagents. Activation of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway in the double mutant strains was further indicated by the markedly induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases, such as HpMpk1p and HpHog1p. Noticeably, O-mannosylation of the surface glycoproteins HpWsc1p and HpMid2p became severely defective only in the double mutants, supporting the involvement of HpPmt5p and HpPmt6p in O-mannosylation of these sensor proteins. On the other hand, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed only marginal interaction between HpPmt5p and HpPmt2p, even in the absence of HpPmt1p. Taken together, our results suggest that the functions of HpPmt5p and HpPmt6p are minor but become crucial upon the loss of HpPmt1p for protein O-mannosylation, which is essential for cell growth, cell wall integrity, and stress resistance in H. polymorpha.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fgb.2013.08.003DOI Listing
April 2014

Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

Biotechnol Bioeng 2011 Aug 3;108(8):1776-87. Epub 2011 Apr 3.

Microbial Resources Research Center, College of Natural Sciences, Ewha Womans,University, Seoul, Korea.

Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by using gTME.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.23141DOI Listing
August 2011

Glycoengineering of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha for the production of glycoproteins with trimannosyl core N-glycan by blocking core oligosaccharide assembly.

Biotechnol J 2008 May;3(5):659-68

Omics and Integration Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, Korea.

The initial lipid-linked oligosaccharide Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)-dolichyl pyrophosphate (Dol-PP) for N-glycan is synthesized and assembled at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequently transferred to a nascent polypeptide by the oligosaccharide transferase complex. We have identified an ALG3 homolog (HpALG3) coding for a dolichyl-phosphate-mannose dependent alpha-1,3-mannosyltransferase in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha. The detailed analysis of glycan structure by linkage-specific mannosidase digestion showed that HpALG3 is responsible for the conversion of Man5GlcNAc(2)-Dol-PP to Man(6)GlcNAc(2)-Dol-PP, the first step to attach a mannose to the lipid-linked oligosaccharide in the ER. The N-glycosylation pathway of H. polymorpha has been remodeled by deleting the HpALG3 gene in the Hpoch1 null mutant strain blocked in the yeast-specific outer mannose chain synthesis and by introducing an ER-targeted Aspergillus saitoi alpha-1,2-mannosidase gene. This glycoengineered H. polymorpha strain produced glycoproteins mainly containing trimannosyl core N-glycan (Man(3)GlcNAc(2)), which is the common core backbone of various human-type N-glycans. The results demonstrate the high potential of H. polymorpha to be developed as an efficient expression system for the production of glycoproteins with humanized glycans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biot.200700252DOI Listing
May 2008