Publications by authors named "Hye Kyeong Kwon"

3 Publications

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Integrated Quantitative Phosphoproteomics and Cell-based Functional Screening Reveals Specific Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy-related Phosphorylation Sites.

Mol Cells 2021 Jul;44(7):500-516

School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 61005, Korea.

Cardiac hypertrophic signaling cascades resulting in heart failure diseases are mediated by protein phosphorylation. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics have led to the identification of thousands of differentially phosphorylated proteins and their phosphorylation sites. However, functional studies of these differentially phosphorylated proteins have not been conducted in a large-scale or high-throughput manner due to a lack of methods capable of revealing the functional relevance of each phosphorylation site. In this study, an integrated approach combining quantitative phosphoproteomics and cell-based functional screening using phosphorylation competition peptides was developed. A pathological cardiac hypertrophy model, junctate-1 transgenic mice and control mice, were analyzed using label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify differentially phosphorylated proteins and sites. A cell-based functional assay system measuring hypertrophic cell growth of neonatal rat ventricle cardiomyocytes (NRVMs) following phenylephrine treatment was applied, and changes in phosphorylation of individual differentially phosphorylated sites were induced by incorporation of phosphorylation competition peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides. Cell-based functional screening against 18 selected phosphorylation sites identified three phosphorylation sites (Ser-98, Ser-179 of Ldb3, and Ser-1146 of palladin) displaying near-complete inhibition of cardiac hypertrophic growth of NRVMs. Changes in phosphorylation levels of Ser-98 and Ser-179 in Ldb3 were further confirmed in NRVMs and other pathological/physiological hypertrophy models, including transverse aortic constriction and swimming models, using site-specific phospho-antibodies. Our integrated approach can be used to identify functionally important phosphorylation sites among differentially phosphorylated sites, and unlike conventional approaches, it is easily applicable for large-scale and/or high-throughput analyses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14348/molcells.2021.4002DOI Listing
July 2021

Comparative proteomic analysis of mouse models of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy, with selection of biomarkers of pathological hypertrophy by integrative Proteogenomics.

Biochim Biophys Acta Proteins Proteom 2018 Jul 23. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju, 61005, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

To determine fundamental characteristics of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, protein expression profiles in two widely accepted models of cardiac hypertrophy (swimming-trained mouse for physiological hypertrophy and pressure-overload-induced mouse for pathological hypertrophy) were compared using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. Among 3955 proteins (19,235 peptides, false-discovery rate < 0.01) identified in these models, 486 were differentially expressed with a log fold difference ≥ 0.58, or were detected in only one hypertrophy model (each protein from 4 technical replicates, p < .05). Analysis of gene ontology biological processes and KEGG pathways identified cellular processes enriched in one or both hypertrophy models. Processes unique to pathological hypertrophy were compared with processes previously identified in cardiac-hypertrophy models. Individual proteins with differential expression in processes unique to pathological hypertrophy were further confirmed using the results of previous targeted functional analysis studies. Using a proteogenomic approach combining transcriptomic and proteomic analyses, similar patterns of differential expression were observed for 23 proteins and corresponding genes associated with pathological hypertrophy. A total of 11 proteins were selected as early-stage pathological-hypertrophy biomarker candidates, and the results of western blotting for five of these proteins in independent samples confirmed the patterns of differential expression in mouse models of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbapap.2018.07.006DOI Listing
July 2018

Coupling of ryanodine receptor 2 and voltage-dependent anion channel 2 is essential for Ca²+ transfer from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria in the heart.

Biochem J 2012 Nov;447(3):371-9

School of Life Sciences and Systems Biology Research Centre, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Korea.

The structural proximity and functional coupling between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum) and mitochondria have been suggested to occur in the heart. However, the molecular architecture involved in the SR-mitochondrial coupling remains unclear. In the present study, we performed various genetic and Ca2+-probing studies to resolve the proteins involved in the coupling process. By using the bacterial 2-hybrid, glutathione transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry assays, we found that RyR2 (ryanodine receptor type 2), which is physically associated with VDAC2 (voltage-dependent anion channel 2), was co-localized in SR-mitochondrial junctions. Furthermore, a fractionation study revealed that VDAC2 was co-localized with RyR2 only in the subsarcolemmal region. VDAC2 knockdown by targeted short hairpin RNA led to an increased diastolic [Ca2+] (calcium concentration) and abolishment of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Collectively, the present study suggests that the coupling of VDAC2 with RyR2 is essential for Ca2+ transfer from the SR to mitochondria in the heart.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20120705DOI Listing
November 2012
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